Drury Jay Gilbert
of Navarro County, Texas


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D. J. Gilbert in 1862 joined Company C 28th Louisiana Infantry under Colonel Gray, serving  on the West side of the Mississippi river.  He participated in the Battle of Camp Bigland, Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, Yellow Bayou, and many skirmishes.  He was color bearer for his regiment during his term of service from 1862 - 1865.  He was home on a sick furlough at the time of surrender.  After the Civil War he began farming in Louisiana, until 1868 when he came to Texas.  He reached Texas with $1,000 in gold, an ox team with covered wagon and supplies for one year.  Rented land in Navarro, County for three years, bought 120 acres of land in Freestone, County, where he farmed and raised stock for twelve years.

He then moved to his present home of 3000 acres in Navarro, County since which time he has engaged almost exclusively in stock raising.  At his death, he was the oldest cattleman in Navarro, County.  Was married to Miss Louisa Aycock in 1863, a native of Louisiana, a daughter of James and Denisa (Mayberry) Aycock.  To Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert were born thirteen (13) children.  One of these children was Daisy Mae (Gilbert) Easterling, and she was my Grandmother.  This information was taken from the Streetman Enterprise Newspaper on Friday October 3,1913 which was the date of the death of D. J. Gilbert.  He was a 50 year mason and a charter member of the Birdston Lodge #333.

This date can also be verified by the white tombstone which sits upright beside his wife in Cade Cemetery

Notes:

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This was in the Streetman Enterprize Newspaper on Friday October 3, 1913.

BIOGRAPHY: D. J. Gilbert

Born December 11, 1842

Died September 17, 1913

Born in Macon Georgia, youngest son of T. J. and Lavina (Thorp) Gilbert, natives of Georgia. They were of English - German extraction, the Thorps of German.

Both families came to America before the War for Independence, settling in South Caroline and Virginia. The Grand father (Gilbert) afterwards moved to Georgia.

They always made a specialty of farming and agriculture pursuits. The Great Grandfather served seven years in the War for Independence and was an officer in the Army. Thomas J. Gilbert (D. J. Gilberts father) was born in Georgia and engaged in farming until latter years, engaged in the mercantile business. In 1844 he moved to Union Parish, Louisiana, resided there twenty five (25) years, came to Texas in 1868, settled at Birdston, in Navarro, County after three (3) years moved to Wortham, Freestone, County where he died in 1872 age 64 years. While in Georgia, he served as major in the State Militia, and was elected to other offices of public trust. His wife died in 1888 age 73 years. They were of the Old Primitive Baptist faith and were leading lights and landmarks of the denomination.

D.J. and Lavina (Thorp) Gilbert were the parents of five (5) children to wit:

Captain J.S. and Partha E. (wife of W.W. Ward)

Lodesky E. (wife of J.D. Nickles) Alexander, he was killed in the battle of Spotsylvania, Virginia.

D.J. Gilbert received a limited education in Union Parrish, Louisiana. In May 1861 joined the Confederate Army. His brother J.S. Gilbert, was appointed Lieutenant of Command, and was ordered to New Orleans. One year later the company adjourned, and D.J. returned home. In 1862, joined Company C. 28th Louisiana Infantry, under Colonel Gray, serving west of the Mississippi River, participating in the Battle of Camp Bigland, Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, Yellow Bayou, and many skirmishes. He was color bearer for his regiment during his term of service from 1862 - 1865. He was at home on a sick furlough at time of surrender. After the war he began farming in Louisiana, until 1868 when he came to Texas. He reached Texas with $1,000 in gold, and an ox team and wagon and supplies for one year. Rented land in Navarro, County for three years, when he bought 120 acres of land in Freestone, County, where he farmed and raised stock for twelve years. He then moved to his present home of 30! 00 acres in Navarro, County since which time he has engaged almost exclusively in stock raising. At his death, he was the oldest cattleman in Navarro, County. Was married to Miss Louisa Aycock in 1863, a native of Louisiana, and a daughter of James and Denisa (Mayberry) Aycock. To Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert were born thirteen (13) children namely:

Dinesa, (wife of A. M. Milligan - of Corsicana)

Dora, (wife of R. L. Reed of - Cooledge, Texas)

Ada, (wife of W. G. McConnell, deceased)

Thomas F. of Hubbard

Jay, (wife of W. T. Grogan of Cooledge, TX)

Amma, (wife of W. R. O'Neal of - Streetman, TX.)

Daisy Mae, (wife of Will D. Easterling of Chatfield, TX.)

Eula, (wife of J. W. Gregory of Streetman, TX.)

Beryl, (Wife of E. M. McDaniel of Streetman, TX.)

Four (4) children died. Two sons and two daughters died in infancy.

D. J. Gilbert joined the A. F. & A.M. Masonic Lodge at the age of 21. He was a charter member of Birdston Lodge 333 in which he filled all its chairs. Was an ardent Mason for 50 years and was laid to rest with Masonic Rites. His religion was "Believe in God, and obey the Ten Commandments." Or as he termed it "Obey the moral law" which he followed, all through life. He was charitable without being ostentatious: his word was his bond, and his friends were not confined to any particular class for his value of a man or woman was based on their "internal" and not their "external" qualifications. The last few years of his life were spent in retirement on his ranch, where he enjoyed the well-earned rest.

Three year ago, his heart began to fail and the past year he was confined to his room, except six weeks spent in Corsicana under treatment of Dr. J.N. Suttle and two weeks in Teague under treatment of Dr. Cox. He was cheerful and hopeful and rational up to eight hours before he died. He had no fear of death and talked frequently of it; was satisfied; said he had lived the allotted three score and ten, and been blessed always. He had lived to see his family reach manhood & womanhood and are happily married being permanently and comfortably located: had left nothing unfinished and for 5 years or more had arranged his business affairs preparatory to his demise. His interment took place at the Cade Cemetery and was conducted by the Masonic Fraternity by members of the Lodge he helped to organize fifty (50) years ago, being the last of the Charter Members.

The largest concourse of friends and relatives ever see in Streetman was assembled to pay their last respect to his remains. His request to be buried in a brick vault and metallic casket, so constructed that his remains would never be touched by any outside cause was complied with. Floral offerings were beautiful and almost innumerable. A horde of friends and relatives from Corsicana, Teague, Wortham, Mexia, and Hubbard were in attendance.
 

Notes:

  • Submitted by John M. Watkins


Navarro County TXGenWeb
Copyright March, 2009
Edward L. Williams & Barbara Knox