George W. Jackson
of Navarro County, Texas


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G. W. Jackson moved to Corsicana in the 1800s to teach at one of the first schools for African American children in North Texas. G. W. Jackson High School was named in his honor and educated students for about 50 years until it was closed in the 1970s in order to comply with federal desegregation orders. In 2007, the city council voted to rename East Fifth Avenue to G. W. Jackson Avenue in his honor.


OBITUARY

July 22, 1940
George W. Jackson, died Jul. 1940

Negro Educator Dies
CORSICANA, Texas, July 22. George W. Jackson, 80, pioneer Negro educator, civic, church and fraternal leader, died here Sunday night. He had been principal of the local Negro schools for forty-five years prior to his retirement, and was grand master of the Grand United Order of Odd Fellows six years. He was the author of a number of books, and a graduate of Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn. Surviving are his wife and a son, B. A. Jackson. Harvard graduate and now connected with the New York City Post Office.
Submitted by Dana Stubbs

 

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PROMINENT NEGRO EDUCATOR BURIED TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Funeral services for G. W. Jackson, aged 80 years, pioneer negro educator, civic, religious and fraternal leader and author, who died Sunday night, were held Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock from the Bethel A. M. E. church, with burial in Woodland cemetery here.

A native of Alabama, Jackson came to Navarro county in 1876, and taught school, with the exception of four years spent at Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn., until his retirement several years ago. He was principal of the local negro schools for 45 years. G. W. Jackson Negro High school was named in his honor. He was grand master of the Grand United Order of Odd Fellows for six years, and held numerous other lesser offices. He was also a Knight of Pythias and Mason. Surviving are his wife and a sister of Corsicana and a son in New York City.

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