Obituaries from
Navarro County, Texas


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William A. Hicks
Aug. 20, 1874 - May 9. 1923

HUGHES-MCKIE WELL STILL BURNING—FOURTEEN KNOWN DEAD

THOUSANDS VISITED LOCATION OF GURNING WELL—CROWDS THRONGED THROUGH MORGUE VIEWING BODIES

Like an active volcano in eruption, belching forth terrific flames of burning fire constantly fed by the constant flow of oil and gas, the Hughes-McKie well in holocaust which has cost at least 14 men their lives, continues to gush forth its awful blaze at 3 o’clock today.

For twenty-four solid hours flames ranging from 30 feet to 150 feet have leaped high in the air in its spectacular capers. Red streaks of flame ascend as from a mighty nozzle, and disappear in the form of huge black clouds of smoke, which drift with the wind in a surging blast.

The wind switched from the southward during the night and the mighty smokestack releases its flow in the direction of Powell, leaving darkened elements in its wake.

Thousands hurried frantically to the fields during last night to witness the spectacular fire-works.

The well being situated on the east bank of the creek is surrounded by tall timber. A rough one-way traffic road forming a winding snake trail for two miles is the only means of vehicle access to the scene. The roads were choked with vehicle traffic within a short time after the fire started. This kept up all night.

The well has been fenced off and traffic barred on the narrow road to give the men full right of way in getting boilers to the location.

Every company owning equipment in the Powell fields has tendered the use of all available boilers and other equipment to extinguish the flame.

Men are working like Trojans to get the equipment in place. It will be necessary to use fire foam and steam from a dozen boilers.

The burned bodies of at least six men remain in the fire zone according to DeWitt Watkins, who is working at the well today. He stated to a reporter of the Sun this morning that five bodies could be seen near the well, and there was another one missing. He also stated he believed that one or two spectators perished.

Jim Ball foreman in charge of the work believes the final death toll will reach 18.

Mr. Hughes accompanied by J. S. Banks, his attorney, are at the well this afternoon checking up on the number of dead and missing.

Hundreds of spectators thronged in and out and lingered about the Sutherland Undertaking establishment all day Thursday eager to catch a glimpse of the charred bodies of a number of the working crew which perished in the big blaze Wednesday afternoon when the Hughes-McKie No. 1 well ignited.

Five of the bodies, charred and disfigured by the flames almost beyond recognition, were brought to the morgue early last night. They have been identified as follows:

W.A. PHILLIPS, Kerens.
W. A. HICKS, Wortham.
JACK COOPER, Corsicana.
FRED CRAIG, Roane.
L. P. SHEEK, Dallas.

The bodies of Travis Owen and Emmett Bird, both of Kerens, were brought from the Physicians and Surgeons hospital later in the night, Owen died at 7 o’clock and Bird died at 11:05 o’clock. These two men were dragged from the fire zone and hurried to Corsicana. Each lived only a few hours.

C. B. Keever, J. E. Keever, J. R. Ferris and Jesse Blair from the Keever Undertaking company at Ennis arrived early last night to assist in preparing the bodies for burial.

The bodies of S. P. Allen, field foreman; E. C. Cooper, driller; James Phillips, L. C. Coop, M. O. Turner, have not been recovered. Max Meisner and Charlie Walker are believed to have perished. The charred remains of four can be seen near the well. They cannot be recovered on account of the intensity of the heat.

Funerals This Afternoon.
Funerals for four of the victims of yesterday’s terrible oil field holocaust took place this afternoon. The bodies of W. A. (Ban) Phillips and Travis Owen were taken to Rural Shade were both were raised; Emmett Byrd was interred in Eureka, his former home, and Fred Craig was laid to rest at Chatfield, which was his childhood home.

The ladies of Corsicana and the Chamber of Commerce covered each of the caskets with magnificent flowers.

The remains of L. C. Sheek were sent to Dallas this afternoon and the body of W. A. Hicks will be sent to Wortham tomorrow.

The roustabout crew of 20 men working in the vicinity of the well escaped. Several teamsters and tank men were passing in and about the premises and rushed to the aid of the burning men, but the blaze had swept the bottom before they could be reached.

A negro teamster succeeded in loosening his team from the material wagon and escaped with them. The wagon and its contents were consumed.

Tragic Spectacle.
The scene about the well presented a sad and tragic spectacle when the monstrous explosion came. Both the day and the night crew consisting of twelve men had just started work a short while before. Several bystanders near the well escaped with their lives by running. It is believed that more dead bodies are in the burned area in addition to the known dead.

Men ran in every direction in a frenzy and fell when overcome.

Jimmy Meeks, oil field scout for the Humble Oil & Refining Company; E. W. Quinlin, scout for the Simms Oil Company; Ellis Hammel, drilling contractor; and DeWitt Watkins, members of the roustabout crew, did heroic work in attempting to save the men from their awful death.

Heroic Rescue Work.
Bravely defying all danger at the risk of their own lives rushed headlong to the burning prostrate forms of the groaning men in death agonies in answer to their piteous cries for help and succeeded in bringing them out. The men breathed their last as they were being carried out of the gas, smoke and fire.

Jim Ball escaped with B. B. Simmonds, N. M. Dunman and Dick Pyle. As they made their exit from the timber, Ball turned back to assist Owen. He succeeded in getting him into the open but too late to save his life. Charlie Lewis of Corsicana ran to the assistance of Bird.

Piteous cries for water went up from the two dying men as the ambulance brought them to the hospital.

Meeks, Quinlan, Hammel and Watkins returned towards the well for the other perishing men, but were unable to reach them. Their bodies had been practically reduced to ashes in the blaze which had gained headway. Waste oil in the bottom covering almost an acre upon which large trees saturated with oil had become enveloped in the frenzied inferno.

Quinlan is a world war hero. A native of New York State, he served in the French Army during the early days of the war. Later he served with the Canadian forces.

Quinlan is the possessor of several war medals. He was awarded the Medalto Militaire; the Croix Guerre, and while in the British he service he was the first American to be awarded the Victoria Cross. He received several hard jolts in the war, in the rescue work Wednesday the fumes and smoke temporarily almost overcame him.

Phone Girls Busy.
Shortly after three o’clock a man called the Johnson Drug Store from the Commercial Hotel and communicated the first news that reached Corsicana of the terrible disaster. The caller at the same time told Miss Valsey Hubbard, the operator, that he wanted every doctor available to go to the scene of the McKie well. The call was immediately referred to the chief operator. She rang the Corsicana Surgical and Medical clinic and asked that the doctors be sent. The hospital and every drug store in town were called to assist in every possible way. The undertaking parlors soon dispatched ambulances toward the fire. Emergency telephone calls from Powell, Kerens and Corsicana came pouring into the central office running as high as 2,400 calls per hour.

Frantic calls from various individuals were made in effort to locate the families of the dead and injured men.

Public memorial services will be held at the gospel tent at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., will withhold his regular revival services until after the memorial ceremonies.

The Chamber of Commerce today sent floral offerings to the families of the deceased. A suitable medal will be provided for the family of each man by the commercial organization in commemoration of their brave efforts towards the development of the oil resources of the county.

Among the members of the roustabout crew escaping are L. W. Wilkitz, E. W. Arnett, Whyne Short, J. W. Crosby, Jas. A. McDaniels, J. A. Story, Jim Ball, Ned Dumas, and Johnnie Kennon. The names of the other men have not been learned.

These men had been gathered up from various leases in the Mexia district and brought to assist in taking care of the well. The working record and the names of the men were in Mr. Allen’s pocket, and none of the surviving members are able to give the names of all the men.

Superintendent Walker of the city schools of Henrietta, and wife, father and mother of Mrs. S. P. Allen, and father of Charlie Walker, arrived in Corsicana early today.

Station Agent Wyatt and daughters of Plano, friends of the Walker family are also here.

Mr. Allen’s mother, and Miss Walker of Denton are also here. Miss Walker is a teacher in the Denton College of Industrial Arts. She is a sister of Mrs. Allen.

Notes:

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MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN OIL FIRE

Memorial services in honor of the oil field workers who lost their lived in the big blaze at the Hughes-McKie well Wednesday will be held at the gospel tent, Eleventh street and Seventh avenue at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening.

The ceremonies will be conducted under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Mayor J. S. Eubank and members of the city administration, presidents of the Rotary, Lions, Civic, Advertising clubs, the Retail Merchants’ Association will occupy a place on the rostrum.

Every minister in town will take part in the program.

The ministers will conduct a prayer service. Hugh L. Hiett will sing.

Hon. Luther A. Johnson will make the address of condolence. Other speakers will take part.

Notes:

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FUNERAL SUNDAY FOR REMAINING OIL FIRE VICTIMS

MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN BIG OIL FIELD FIRE WILL BE BURIED HERE

Funeral services for S. P. Allen, Charles Walker, Jim Phillips, C. M. Cooper, E. C. Cooper and L. C. Cook, fire victims of the burning Hughes-McKie oil well, will be held at the First Methodist Church at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon, according to announcement made today by W. S. Banks, attorney for the J. K. Hughes Development Company.

Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the church assisted by Rev. C. G. Vineer, pastor of the Church of Christ, will conduct the services.

The remains of the six bodies will be interred in one casket in a specially provided lot in Oakwood cemetery.

Active pallbearers will be Hon. Luther A. Johnson, Mayor J. S. Eubank, R. J. Jackson, Sam J. Jackson, John C. Calhoun, R. J. Graves, J. L. Halbert and W. H. Hastings.

The smouldering remains of the six men were recovered from the fire area of the ill-fated Hughes-McKie well several days after it caught fire May 9. They have been held at the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors pending the possible recovery of another body believed to have been undiscovered in the debris.

Seven of the perish crew were recovered from the fire shortly after the blaze started. Each were positively identified, and have been buried.

Mr. Banks stated today that the six remaining bodies had been sufficiently identified as to justify giving out the name of each. He stated the official casualty list of the J. K. Hughes Development company places the number of known dead and accounted for at 13. The list is as follows:

S. P. Allen, L. C. Cook, M. O. Turner, Charles Walker, Travis Owens, W. M. (Ban) Phillips, Jim Phillips, L. P. Sheek, W. A. Hicks, C. M. (Jack) Cooper, E. C. Cooper, Emmett G. Byrd, and Fred E. Craig.

One report carried the name of Max Meisner as among the dead and missing. Mr. Banks stated today that communication had been established with Mr. Meisner, and the Hughes company is certain he escaped injury. The company had the fire area thoroughly scorched by men clad in asbestos clothing, and no other body was found. Mr. Banks stated the company feels certain that the bodies of all men who perished in the fire has been found.

The J. K. Hughes Development Company has planned to erect a suitable monument over the grave of the six men to be buried in Oakwood cemetery in remembrance of the total number of its employees losing their lives in the big fire.

A change of plans for extinguishing the fire at the burning well late yesterday appears to have been extended the time before the blaze is stopped. W. H. McClintock has assembled a rig of his own making and patent, which he is confident will put out the fire when brought into play, but so far the apparatus has not been applied. Work was suspended at the well at 5 o’clock Friday, and nothing was done during the night. A different apparatus containing a T-joint and valve gear model has been completed, and efforts are being directed towards apply it before the McClintock machine is used.

Rain last night rendered the creek bottoms and the roads leading to the field in a very muddy condition. Transportation out from town was slow early today, which operated to cause some delay in getting work under way Saturday morning.

Although the roads were very slippery, teams and heavy trucks were on the road with tons of materials for the various new locations for drillings.

A meeting of the stockholders of the Cor-Tex Deep Well Company was held at the well just south of town at 3 o’clock this afternoon. Plans for resuming operations at the test were thoroughly gone over. Several interested individuals attended the meeting and reports are that much enthusiasm is evidenced over the proposed new operations there.

The test south of Blooming Grove to be put down by Dr. Stubbs and Dunbar spudded in at 4 o’clock. Several went out from Corsicana to see the bit take its first plunge into the surface. A local photographer was present to take a view of the rig and the crowds assembled to see the new test stared.

Notes:


Dalton Eugene Miller
May 3, 1933 - Dec 25, 2015

Dalton Eugene Miller was a beautiful soul and loving husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. Dalton (Sonny, or as he came to be known to most, Pops), 82, was wrapped in the arms of God and transitioned to his heavenly home to be with his sweet wife, Doris Mae Miller, on Friday, Dec., 25, 2015.
Pops was born in Shade Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, on May 3, 1933. He spent his childhood around the Windber, Pennsylvania area before joining the Air Force.
While he was stationed in Denver, Colorado, he met the love of his life, Doris Mae Miller (Granny) at the local roller-skating rink. She offered to help him skate, and from there it was history. They married in 1952. During their 63 years of marriage, they created countless cherished memories with their daughters Denice, Deana and Darcel.
While Pops served in the Air Force, he and Granny moved from Colorado to Florida, then Mississippi and Texas. The family settled in Texas in the early 60’s, and spent most of the remainder of their lives raising their children and grandchildren in Haslet, Texas. Pops was a photographer in the Air Force for 14 years and spent the remainder working in avionics at the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base in Fort Worth, Texas. He served a total of 34 years in the Air Force, including time spent during the Korean War, and was stationed at various locations overseas.
Pops could do it all, he was a jack of all trades. Pops could do anything with his hands including; farming, electrical, mechanical work, built an entire home, and he was never afraid to learn on his own. He instilled confidence and hard work in his children and grandchildren and taught each of them that they could do anything they put their mind to. He was the best example of unconditional love. Pops encouraged his entire family to get an education and that hard work really does pay off. He was a very soft spoken, loving man.
Pops and Granny lived the last 10 years of her life at Richland Chambers Lake in Kerens, Texas. They loved gardening together and continued to sow the seeds of their love.
Pops is preceded in death by his loving wife, Doris and his parents, Foster Miller and Florence Alverta Weaver. Brothers; Dwight Leroy Miller, Leonard Paul Miller, Herold Mervin Miller. Sisters Dorothy Mae Miller and Betty LaRue Miller Parish. Grandson, Thomas Hanrahan III and Granddaughter, April Nicole Shelman.
He is survived by his loving daughters, Denice (David) Webb from Haslet, Texas, Deana (Richard) Trawick from Hillsboro, Texas, and Darcel (Thomas) Shelman from Kerens, Texas. Nine grandchildren and their spouses, and 20 great-grandchildren.
Visitation with the family will be Monday, Dec. 28, 2015 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Corley Funeral Home.
Graveside services will be held Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2015 at Chapel Cemetery in Haslet, Texas at 11 a.m.
In lieu of flowers the family respectfully requests donations be made to the Parkinson’s Foundation or Michael J. Fox Foundation.

Notes:



Hugh Sidney Garland
Apr 4, 1949 - Dec 2015

Hugh Sidney Garland passed away peacefully at his home. He was born in Corsicana on April 4, 1949. Sidney attended the Corsicana Catholic school and later Corsicana High School. He joined the United States Army in 1966. He served in Vietnam with Delta Company 2nd Battalion 501st infantry 101st airborne division. Later he also served with the 82nd airborne division. He was awarded the Bronze Star with Valor and one oak leaf cluster. He was awarded the Purple Heart for wounds he received in Combat.
Sidney loved riding his motorcycle and was a proud active member of the North Texas Patriot Guard riders. Sidney made frequent visits to the Dallas VA hospital where he could be seen visiting with Veterans and staff of the VA Community Living Center. He enjoyed visits to National Cemeteries and Veteran Memorials and volunteered and contributed to numerous charities.
He is preceded in death by his parents, Hugh Garland and Elizabeth Beavers Garland and wife, Shirline Garland.
His memory lives on through United States Marine Veteran Christopher Sidney Garland, daughter Tracy Elizabeth Garland, daughter Stacy Renee Garland, grandson Active Duty United States Sailor Jonathan Sweeney, grandson Active Duty United States Sailor Jacob Williams, grandson Joshua Sweeney, grandson Joseph Williams, granddaughter Taylor Garland, granddaughter Kylie Garland, grandson Brandon Jolly, son-in-law Harley Miller, stepson Kin Prewitt, stepdaughters Tonya Prewitt Doyle, Ondrea Northern and numerous other loved family members and friends.
Graveside service will be held 10 a.m. am Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at the Dallas National Cemetery. Memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016 at Griffin-Roughton Funeral Home.
Arrangements by Griffin-Roughton Funeral Home

Notes:


William Loving Medaris
Dec 7, 1860 - Jun 14, 1921

PROMINENT CITIZEN DEAD.

Remains of W. L. Medaris Laid to Rest at Chatfield.

W. L. Medaris, one of Navarro county’s best known and most highly esteemed citizens, died suddenly at his home near Roane at 3:30 yesterday afternoon after an illness of a few minutes. He had eaten his dinner and went out on his farm to look after work being done by some negro tenants, and was taken sick in the field, and died a few minutes after reaching his home. The deceased was born and reared in Freestone county, and moved to this county about thirty years ago. He is survived by his wife and five children, Roy Medaris, of Corsicana, Mrs. R. J. Graves of Corsicana, Mrs. D. D. Wylie and Mrs. Allen Boiles and Eddie Medaris of the Roane community. The deceased was a Mason and a Baptist, and Rev. Mr. McKissack, a life long friend, of Streetman, officiated at the services in the home, and the Masons had charge of the services at the grave at 4:30 this afternoon, with interment in the Chatfield cemetery. There was an immense attendance at the grave and many beautiful flowers.

Notes:

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Funeral Wednesday Afternoon.

Funeral services for W. L. Medaris who died suddenly Tuesday afternoon, were conducted yesterday afternoon, the Rev. Mr. McKissack of Streetman and the Masons having charge of the services. The deceased was well known in Navarro county and had many friends who will join in extending their sympathy to the bereaved family. The funeral was largely attended and there were many beautiful floral offerings.

The following acted as pallbearers:
Active—K. E. McKee, J. A. Wallace, R. M. McMullen, O. E. Stone, Dr. J. J. Hamilton, J. A. Bonner.

Honorary—A. M. Milligan, Pole Edens, W. A. Mizell, Carl McMullen, J. T. Montfort, Dr. E. B. Lowrey, A. J. Barker, Robt. Montfort, Geo. L. Jackson, S. A. Reagan, C. W. Reagan, A. Adams, D. H. Bell, W. H. Jeffers, J. H. Laningham, C. R. Graves, J. B. Thorp, B. F. Guynes, W. B. Finch, Tom Chandler, J. H. Frick, Will Jackson, Mat Montfort, W. W. Hurlburt, J. M. Dyer, Murphy Williams, Lee Bonner, Wes Redden, R. R. Graves, Perry McCammon, W. A. Malore.

Notes:

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In Loving Memory of Our Friend, W. L. Medaris.

Mr. Medaris was born near Fairfield, Freestone county, December 7, 1860, and died at Montfort, Navarro county, June 14, 1921, just 61 years, 6 months and 7 days of usefulness given to the betterment of this earth and to the glory of God. He came to this county in 1887. At that time this place was known as Bradley School House. There were no regular church services here then, but Mr. Medaris started in with all the zeal of his young manhood to build up a church here. He himself having joined the Baptist church at the age of 22. After a long hard struggle he built up a good church and a live Sunday School, and we as a community and church owe thanks to him for being what it is now and what it was in the past. He was Sunday School Superintendent for many years. He was regular in attendance until bad health prevented. He labored long and hard to make us realize the condition of our spiritual lives and did all a human could do to better conditions. He gave liberally to the church, and the cry of the needy was never turned coldly aside, but was given honest and prayerful attention.

He worked for the social benefit of the community, always encouraged any movement for the better. He was interested in the school. He was also one of the first in the great war work. He gave money and time to keep the torch burning which was handed to us by the boys “In Flanders Field” to light the world to a better place and a better understanding of God.

Mr. Medaris was manager of the Bradley-McQuary estate. He was a man of his word. His words were accepted as his bond by his tenants, some of whom have been with him for 15 or 20 years. They mourn him as a dear friend and neighbor and as a man whose business motto was “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” He had his human weaknesses, it is true, but we loved him in spite of them and they made him the more dear to us, for we could see how he strived to overcome them. That set a good example for us all, and gave us courage to renew our own battles. There is no man who will be more missed from our midst than Mr. Medaris, for almost everyone in the county knew him. His memory will be kept as a comforting thought in the hearts of all who loved and cherished him, as an example of what a firm faith in God, can accomplish for a man. It made a good husband and father of him, which is testified to by the love and obedience of his wife and children. He was ever thoughtful of their welfare, and his children were his pride, for he lived to see them grow to useful manhood and womanhood.

And to you, dear ones, he left you a wonderful heritage, his faith in God. I know you miss him every hour, but if he knew he would want you not to grieve so for him, but take up his work and follow on. There is no use to say, don’t grieve, for I know by sad experience that only the merciful hand of time can heal that desolate ache. Here is a poem that comforts me, for it means every single one of you, and every heart that aches in the world:

Each by Name.

Never a foolish little lamb astray in the gleaming dim,
But the tender Shepherd knoweth its name, and calleth it home to Him.
In the flock and the fold the sheep are His, and He keepeth them close in His care;
And each for itself in the Shepherd’s heart hath its own peculiar share.

Never a moor so wrapped in mist, was a hill so gray and dim,
But the Shepherd counteth His lambkins there, and watcheth them one by one.
Never a day so bleak and chill, nor a night so dark and drear,
But the tireless love of the Shepherd waits for the sheep that are passing dear.

Never a weary, way-worn sheep in the great world flock today
But may hear the call of the Shepherd’s voice may follow Him and obey.
The Shepherd hath ransomed the great world flock, He hath brought it for His own,
And He loveth and guardeth it, one by one, as were each in the world alone.

Mr. Medaris was a Democrat in politics. He was commissioner of this district for one term. Also he was a Mason and had been for 30 or 35 years.

Mr. Medaris was married in 1882, near Fairfield to Miss Charity P. Speed. God gave them one boy, William Roy Medaris, of Corsicana. The mother had finished her mission, for God called her in 1885.

In 1886 Mr. Medaris was married to Miss Isabella E. Speed. They lived one year in Freestone county, then moved to Navarro, where they spent the rest of their lives together. Their union was blessed with four children, Mrs. R. J. Graves of Corsicana, Mrs. D. D. Wylie, Mrs. R. A. Doyles and Eddie Medaris of this community.

Mr. Medaris was suddenly stricken. He had been in poor health for several years, but was able to attend to his business. He was buried at Chatfield June 15th. The funeral services were held at the home, Rev. Mr. Stanley of Streetman officiating. His address showed the high esteem in which Mr. Medaris was held. The song service was held by Mrs. George F. Miller, Mr. C. A. Middleton and Mr. and Mrs. Will Cheney of Corsicana. The song service was beautiful and comforting. One song, “We Shall Gather at the River,” was sung by request. The funeral took place at the Chatfield cemetery. The funeral procession was one of the most impressive ever beheld in this neighborhood. The Masons took charge at the cemetery and used their usual solemn and beautiful burial ceremony. The floral offerings were unusually beautiful. Besides the other offerings the “Sunflower Grove” at this place sent a wreath representing their name. the Masons sent a beautiful wreath also. The flowers, in their still beauty were such a beautiful symbolism of our future life, for we see the cold winds cause them to wither away, but in the spring they are resurrected to a more lovely form of beauty.

We have tried in our weak way to express the sorrow and sympathy of a sorrowing community. We ask God to guide and keep us all and especially protect and comfort the bereaved ones. “So live that when thy summons comes to join the innumerable caravan which moves to that mysterious stream where each shall take his chamber in the silent halls of death, then go not like the quarry slave at night, sentenced to his dungeon, but sustained and soothed by an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave. Like one that wraps the drapery of his cloak about him and lies down to pleasant dreams.”

Written by
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. BROWN.

Notes:

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Written in Memory of William Loving Medaris.

He was born December 7, 1860, in Freestone county, Texas and died June 14, 1921, at his home near Montfort, Texas. He was sixty years, six months and seven days old. Mr. Medaris was born from above and united with the Missionary Baptist church in 1882; for thirty-eight years he has been a child of God and has stood firm for the doctrines of Jesus Christ.

Tranquil amid alarms
It found him on the field
A worker ready with his arms,
Bearing his red-cross shield.
His sword was in his hand,
Still warm with recent fight,
Ready at a moment’s command
Thro rock and steel to smite.

One thing I wish to mention was the firmness which our brother in Christ practiced in his life. He was not found on the fence in religion or in politics; he took a stand and that for the right, as we should all do, and he was not carried about with every wind of doctrine but he contended earnestly for the Faith once delivered to the saints and that was one reason that he accomplished so much in his life, and he was loved and admired because he had the grace and the courage to live for God and stand firm at all times and under all circumstances; like Paul of old he was true and faithful.

How hard to give him up
No mortal one can see;
But the Lord has called him back
From this dark world to heaven.

Now his wife sits so lonely,
And his children’s hearts are sad,
While his sisters’ hearts are breaking
And his friends feel so sad.

Sleep on dear one,
Sleep on, it won’t be long
Until we’ll go to meet you
Among the ransomed throng.

Mr. Medaris was married to Miss Charity P. Speed in 1882. To them was born one child, Mr. William Roy Medaris. On August 9, 1885 his wife died and in 1886 he was married to Isabella Ester Speed, a sister of his first wife. To them was born three daughters and one son, Mrs. D. D. Wylie, Mrs. R. J. Graves, Mrs. B. A. Boyles and Eddie Medaris.

Every one that knew him
Is filled with grief today.
Because this precious jewel
Has passed from earth away.

Yes, now his body is sleeping
Beneath the cold, cold sod;
But then his spirit’s living,
In heaven above with God.

He was a true democrat, a good citizen, a kind husband and father, a person ready and willing to help anyone in need, a friend to all both rich and poor. This fact was proven on the day of the funeral. People from all parts of this county came to look for the last time on the face of this good man in some of the county’s best autos on down to “old Fords,” and some in buggies, for like his Savior he was no respecter of persons.

His wife and all his children and four small grand children, also three sisters, Mrs. Kate Walker of Dallas, Mrs. Minnie Kennedy of Vernon and Mrs. Mary Lowry of Tulsa, Okla., and a number of other relatives and a host of friends are left to grieve over his departure; but dear friends and loved ones if he could speak to us today he would say-----

Gone are some who love you,
But they wait above you,
And to them the Savior
Waits your soul to guide.

Angel voices falling
Now to you are calling,
Waiting for the meeting
One the other side.

God help each one of us to say,
Thy will, not mine be done;
Grant we may meet our dear one
At the setting of the sun.

Funeral services were conducted at his home by Rev. J. F. Stanley and Rev. Caraway and his body was laid to rest in the cemetery at Chatfield beneath a mound of beautiful flowers. The Masons conducted the services at the grave, he being a member of that lodge. There was a large crowd attended his funeral to pay their last tribute of respect to a man that was loved and respected by all who knew him.

Blessed are they that die in the Lord for the works do follow them.

MRS. EDGAR PIKE.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, July 28, 1921
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • 1st wife Charity Pamelia (Speed) Medaris married 1882 (died Aug. 9, 1885) 2nd wife Isabel Esther (Speed) Medaris married 1886 (sister of first wife) s/o O. C. Medaris and Mary (Goodwin) Medaris per death certificate

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IN Memoriam of W. L. Medaris.

W. L. Medaris was born in Freestone county, Texas, Dec. 7, 1860, and departed this life June 14, 1921, at the age of 61 years, at the family home near Montfort, Navarro county, Texas.

Mr. Medaris was born at a critical period in the history of this state and spent his boyhood in the county of his birth under all the disadvantages of the era of reconstruction following the civil war. His educational opportunities were limited, but notwithstanding he became a man of true worth. His sterling character took form at an early age, and throughout his life he exerted upon all with whom he came in contact a profound influence for good.

At the age of 22 years, Mr. Medaris became a member of the Missionary Baptist church and lived in that faith consistently to his death. In 1887 he moved from Freestone county to the county of Navarro and settled in the community where he died. The country being new and undeveloped there were few churches or schools and the instrumentalities of social service were very meager. But this man was undaunted, and soon set himself to work in an endeavor to establish and build up a church, and as a result thereof the Montfort Baptist church was established and Mr. Medaris became one of the leading members from the date of its organization. For many years he served in the capacity of deacon, and was superintendent of Sunday school almost constantly. However, his greatest service was not in his official church position, but in his genuine fellowship and love for his fellow man. In his religious convictions he was firm, yet liberal, and never denied to any one the right to his own beliefs. His death is a great loss to the religious forces of this county.

Mr. Medaris was a Mason for many years and so far as is humanly possible he attained the ideal set by that order. To the by-laws and regulations of his lodge he was always obedient, and in the performances of the fraternal obligation imposed upon him he was most diligent. He loved the lodge next to his church, and its work and ritual he contributed a great deal of his time and the best of his talent. He became a Mason while the lodge was located at Chatfield, but later the lodge being removed to Rice, Texas, he followed and was th the time of his death a member of Rice Lodge No. 577.

Politically Mr. Medaris was a democrat and always supported the principles for which that party stands. He took a keen interest in the government of his country, local, state and national. He served his county as commissioner for one term and to the duties of this office he gave an honest and diligent attention and stood for what he believed to be right without fear or favor. But Mr. Medaris was a democrat in the broader sense and was an uncompromising champion of human liberty. He believed in the equality of opportunity, in the rule of law guided by reason, and was always considerate of the rights of the minority. Naturally inclined to individual independence the environment of his early life and the training and experience of his boyhood brought out those qualities to full development.

Mr. Medaris was an advocate of human progress. Knowing that the race could not stand still, he refused to go backward, and was ever found in the forefront of the combre march of civilization. To the interest of his community he was always devoted and was considered by all who knew him as the logical leader of all movements for the betterment of the people. He took a keen interest in all manner of social improvement. Was an advocate of good roads, good schools, good churches, good homes and the natural result of all, good citizenship. During the late world war we had an opportunity to observe the heart of the man really at work. He was active in his support of the war program of the government, and with the greatest patriotic fervor he did his bit. He bought bonds and war savings stamps till it hurt and in many ways made himself an aid and support to the morale of the people whose duty it was to back up the armies at the front.

In his business life Mr. Medaris was a shining example of honesty and integrity. He dealt with his fellow man as he would that his fellow man should deal with him. His word once given became to him at least, his bond, and was most scrupulously kept. His honesty and trustworthiness was one of his strongest characteristics and his reputation in that regard was none too good for the character upon which it was based.

He had a wide and varied experience as a farmer and landlord, this occupation being that to which he devoted the business activities of a life time. Of this business he made a signal success, and had he loved the dollar a little more and his fellowman much less, could have amassed a fortune. Mr. Medaris during his life time had many tenants on his farm, and the trust and confidence they imposed in him is a fitting testimonial of the bigness of his soul. He always believed that co-operation should govern the relation between him and them, and he put that principle into practice. He believed that his interests were identical with theirs, and that when his tenant prospered he would prosper, and as a result of this every man who ever lived on or cultivated his farm directly or indirectly became his staunch friend.

Mr. Medaris married while yet a young man to Miss Charity Speed of Freestone county, Texas, this union was solemnized in 1882, and to them was born one son, W. Roy Medaris of this city. The young wife and mother died in 1885. The following year, Mr. Medaris married Miss Isabella Speed, a sister of his former wife. There were born to this union four children, Mrs. D. D. Wylie, Montfort, Texas; Mrs. R. J. Graves, Corsicana; Mrs. B. A. Boyles, Montfort, Texas, and Eddie Medaris who still resides at the family home. Also surviving is the bereaved wife and three sisters, Mrs. W. F. Walker, Dallas; Mrs. D. D. Kennedy, Vernon, Texas, and Mrs. J. C. Lowery, Tulsa, Okla.

In his home life, Mr. Medaris was an ideal husband and father. He taught his children by example as much as by precept and took the lead in all family activities whether it be work or play. He asked his family to endure nothing that he was not willing to undergo, and he claimed no joys for himself that he did not share with them. In their bereavement those surviving have the sympathy of a vast host of friends, a host numbered by the extent of Mr. Medaris’ acquaintance.

Mr. Medaris was laid to rest in the Chatfield cemetery and funeral was attended by a host of friends of the family. The floral offerings were many and were fitting testimonial of the esteem in which he was generally regarded. The funeral service was had at the family residence.

Notes:


Ruby Murry
Dec 3, 1911 - Jan 4, 1918

Obituary

Ruby Murray departed this life January 4th, 1918, at the age of seven years. She leaves her mother, Mrs. Hallie Murray and a brother, Alba, and sister, Jewel, also her devoted grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Avins.

Although an afflicted child since baby-hood she was always patient and of a most lovable disposition, and will be greatly missed. While we mourn the loss of our dear one, we are comforted by the thought that she is safe in the arms of Jesus, and that she is forever free from all suffering and sorrow. Her little task here is completed, and she has been called to her reward. What a joyful meeting that will be, when we all pass on through this vale of tears, to that beautiful home above, where we shall meet all the dear ones gone on before.

A FRIEND.

Notes:


William Thomas Aven
Mar 3, 1854 - Sep 21, 1934

FUNERAL FOR AGED NAVARRO PIONEER IS HELD SATURDAY

Funeral rites for William Thomas Aven, eighty-year-old pioneer resident of Navarro county, who died north of Powell Friday morning at 5 o’clock were held at 2:30 Saturday afternoon at the Bazette church, with interment in the Bazette cemetery. The services were conducted by Rev. W. Z. Corbin, Baptist minister.

He had been ill but a short time.

Surviving are two sons, L. E. Aven, Fort Worth, and J. C. Aven, Emhouse; three daughters, Mrs. Hallie Murray, Powell; Mrs. W. B. Turns, Richland and Mrs. Will Pierce, Powell; a brother, A, J. Aven, Shellwater, Texas and other relatives.

Funeral arrangements were handled by Corley Funeral Home.

Notes:


Martha Bell “Mattie” (Farley) Guinn
Dec 3, 1857 - May 23, 1918

Bazette News.

Mrs. A. H. Guinn, age fifty-nine years of age, and a highly esteemed resident of the Independence community passed away at her home last Thursday morning after a lingering illness.

The deceased was a good woman and was liked by all who knew her. She leaves to mourn her absence, a companion, six daughters and four sons and a host of friends. The remains were interred in the Bazette cemetery Thursday afternoon. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. I. Windsor of Kerens and Rev. E. S. Carlton. We extend the bereaved our heartfelt sympathy.

Notes:


William Fletcher Brown
Mar 21, 1874 - Jan 28, 1919

Died Near Powell.

W. F. Brown, aged forty-five years, a well known farmer of the DeArmond community near Powell, died Monday night, and the remains were interred in the Bazette cemetery yesterday, Rev. T. E. Lucas officiating. The wife of the deceased preceded him to the grave just two weeks. The couple left ten children, five of the being under fifteen years of age.

Notes:


Josie Lee (Ferrell) Williams-Carpenter) Boone
Jul 28, 1925 - Sep 20, 2015

Josie L. Carpenter Boone. Born on July 28, 1925 in a little town of Athens, Texas. Lived 90 years of her life at the fullest. She worked all of her life real hard to take care of her family and friends. People called her Angel and her nickname was Josie Lee. She started working on a farm with her dad after her mom died when she was 9 years old and raised her sister Nadine who was only 16 months old, along with her 2 brothers. She only went to school until the 5th grade. She then outlived all her immediate family. She married three times and outlived all of them, John Williams, Dayton Carpenter, and John Boone. She also outlived her two children, Larry and Barbara, and her granddaughter Yvette Ivey. As she got older, she worked in Athens, Texas at the Dairy Queen, then worked in Corsicana, Texas, then moved to Garland, Texas and retired from Varo after 28 years. She then moved to Princeton, Texas for 12 years and finally returned to Garland, Texas. Her hobbies were sewing, crossword puzzles and traveling. She spoiled all of her grandchildren and they loved to go to her house because there was always food there. Josie was also a very Christian person and was actively involved at church for many, many years and loved God. She always had a funny sense of humor and always happy. She made people laugh. She was an unbelievable woman, and took care of a lot of sick family. There are not enough words to express how great she was. She will be truly missed. We will always love our mamaw Josie. Preceded in death by: parents, Sam and Alice Ferrell; brothers, Paul and Clarence; sister, Nadine Caroll; son, Larry Carpenter; daughter, Barbara Ivey; husbands, John Williams, Dayton Carpenter, John Boone; granddaughter, Yvette Ivey. Survived by: grandchildren, Jason, Ron, and Katie; 8 great-grandchildren; one great-great granddaughter; and son-in-law, Roy Ivey, Jr. The family will receive friends, Thursday, September 24, 2015, from 6:00 until 8:00 PM, at the funeral home. Funeral service will be held, 1:00 PM, Friday, Sparkman/Crane Funeral Home Chapel. Interment will follow at Kerens Cemetery, Kerens, Texas.
 


Earl Leroy Rowe
Feb 13, 1924 - Apr 7, 2016

Earl Leroy Rowe was born on February 13, 1924 in Ogden, Utah to Lodasca Williams and Jay Herman Rowe. He was the oldest of six boys: Jay Rowe, Claude Mills, Ed Mills, David Stouffer, Clifford Stouffer and Lewis Rowe. His family moved to Bitter Creek, Wyoming where his step-father, Claude Mills, worked for the railroad. Since the public school only went to the 8th grade, he moved to Evanston, Wyoming and lived with his Aunt Mildred Cronin (Point of the Rocks, Wyoming). He attended Evanston High School from 9th – 12th grades and graduated on May 22, 1942. Upon graduation, he went to Utah Agricultural University (aka Utah State University) in Logan, Utah in 1942. Along with the standard college curriculum, he joined the Civilian Pilot Training Program sponsored by the US government to train civilian pilots for military preparedness. In this program, he became an aviation cadet. On August 3, 1942, he joined the Navy. The Navy sent him to Corpus Christi, Texas where he became a flight instructor on February 29, 1944. He trained pilots for World War II, which he said was a very dangerous job.
On May 10, 1945 he married Billye Frances Fountain Hayley on the Naval Air Base at Corpus Christi, Texas. They have five children: Deborah, Kathleen, Leah, Ellen and Earl Leroy II.
He retired from the Navy in 1947 as a Lieutenant JG. As a civilian, he tried his hand at the restaurant business with his mother-in-law. That lasted about 6 months. Next he opened a lumber business with a partner hauling lumber for construction, which was successful. But he missed flying and enlisted in the Naval Reserves in May 1951. He eventually became the Commanding Officer of an A-4 fighter squadron based in Norfolk, Virginia. On February 13, 1984, he retired from the Naval Reserve. The family moved to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1958 when Earl took a job with the Federal Aviation Agency. He retired from the FAA in 1978.
The family moved to Vienna, Virginia in 1962 and Earl worked for the FAA in Washington, DC.
In 1966, the family moved back to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and he returned to work with the FAA as the flight inspection field office chief. He oversaw the design and installation of the navigation aides in the instrument landing systems when Dallas/Fort Worth airport was built.
Billye and Earl divorced in 1973. He married Oveta Jean Trussell Ford in June 1978. They moved to Chile that year to work for the United Nations in the International Civilian Aviation Organization. He set up radio navigation and instrument landing systems for flight safety in several countries.
During the retirement years, Jean and Earl bought a fifth wheel trailer and traveled to visit family and friends. He loved visiting and traveling to San Antonio and Las Vegas to see his brother, Lewis Rowe. They also bought a 1958 Bonanza airplane to travel. Earl was a talented contractor and handyman. In 1985 he started building a house on Cedar Creek Lake in Malakoff, Texas where they enjoyed fishing and golf. After moving from the Lake house in 1988, they spent the rest of the time living in Oklahoma City on Lakepoint Dr. He spent time buying properties in need of repair, fixing them and renting them. After Jean passed away in July 2008, he started thinking about moving to Dallas to be near Ellen's family. So in December 2008 he moved in to Frisco Lakes in Frisco, Texas. He was active in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Earl served five 6-month missions at the Bishop's storehouse in Carrollton. . He also attended the LDS Dallas Temple weekly.On April 15, 2013, Ellen and Earl visited Nauvoo, Illinois where his ancestors started the long, arduous trek from Nauvoo to Utah during the winter of 1846.

He is survived by:
Deborah Edmonds and her husband Carl of Vacaville, California
Kathleen Gammell of St. George, Utah
Leah O'Keefe and her husband William of St. George Utah
Ellen Sigety and her husband John of Highland Village, Texas
Earl Leroy Rowe II and his wife Jill of Draper, Utah
Dan Ford of Madison, Alabama
Vivian Geeslin and her husband James of McKinney, Texas
Billye Rowe, mother of his five of children

Preceded in Death:
Ovita Jean Trussell Rowe, wife
Patty Mae Ford, step daughter
Two grandchildren, Jason Gammell and Jenna Sigety
Notes:
  • OBITUARY FOR EARL LEROY ROWE Deceased on April 7, 2016
    Baylor Heart Hospital of Plano, Texas
  • Stonebriar Funeral Home, Frisco, Texas - Submitted by Diane Richards
  • (Ed, add U. S. Navy 1945-1947 Naval reserve 1951 -1984)
  • Rose Hill Cemetery, Blooming Grove, Navarro Co., TX

Frederic E. “Fred” Craig
Jun 27, 1897 - May 9, 1923

HUGHES-MCKIE WELL STILL BURNING—FOURTEEN KNOWN DEAD

THOUSANDS VISITED LOCATION OF GURNING WELL—CROWDS THRONGED THROUGH MORGUE VIEWING BODIES

Like an active volcano in eruption, belching forth terrific flames of burning fire constantly fed by the constant flow of oil and gas, the Hughes-McKie well in holocaust which has cost at least 14 men their lives, continues to gush forth its awful blaze at 3 o’clock today.

For twenty-four solid hours flames ranging from 30 feet to 150 feet have leaped high in the air in its spectacular capers. Red streaks of flame ascend as from a mighty nozzle, and disappear in the form of huge black clouds of smoke, which drift with the wind in a surging blast.

The wind switched from the southward during the night and the mighty smokestack releases its flow in the direction of Powell, leaving darkened elements in its wake.

Thousands hurried frantically to the fields during last night to witness the spectacular fire-works.

The well being situated on the east bank of the creek is surrounded by tall timber. A rough one-way traffic road forming a winding snake trail for two miles is the only means of vehicle access to the scene. The roads were choked with vehicle traffic within a short time after the fire started. This kept up all night.

The well has been fenced off and traffic barred on the narrow road to give the men full right of way in getting boilers to the location.

Every company owning equipment in the Powell fields has tendered the use of all available boilers and other equipment to extinguish the flame.

Men are working like Trojans to get the equipment in place. It will be necessary to use fire foam and steam from a dozen boilers.

The burned bodies of at least six men remain in the fire zone according to DeWitt Watkins, who is working at the well today. He stated to a reporter of the Sun this morning that five bodies could be seen near the well, and there was another one missing. He also stated he believed that one or two spectators perished.

Jim Ball foreman in charge of the work believes the final death toll will reach 18.

Mr. Hughes accompanied by J. S. Banks, his attorney, are at the well this afternoon checking up on the number of dead and missing.

Hundreds of spectators thronged in and out and lingered about the Sutherland Undertaking establishment all day Thursday eager to catch a glimpse of the charred bodies of a number of the working crew which perished in the big blaze Wednesday afternoon when the Hughes-McKie No. 1 well ignited.

Five of the bodies, charred and disfigured by the flames almost beyond recognition, were brought to the morgue early last night. They have been identified as follows:

W.A. PHILLIPS, Kerens.
W. A. HICKS, Wortham.
JACK COOPER, Corsicana.
FRED CRAIG, Roane.
L. P. SHEEK, Dallas.

The bodies of Travis Owen and Emmett Bird, both of Kerens, were brought from the Physicians and Surgeons hospital later in the night, Owen died at 7 o’clock and Bird died at 11:05 o’clock. These two men were dragged from the fire zone and hurried to Corsicana. Each lived only a few hours.

C. B. Keever, J. E. Keever, J. R. Ferris and Jesse Blair from the Keever Undertaking company at Ennis arrived early last night to assist in preparing the bodies for burial.

The bodies of S. P. Allen, field foreman; E. C. Cooper, driller; James Phillips, L. C. Coop, M. O. Turner, have not been recovered. Max Meisner and Charlie Walker are believed to have perished. The charred remains of four can be seen near the well. They cannot be recovered on account of the intensity of the heat.

Funerals This Afternoon.
Funerals for four of the victims of yesterday’s terrible oil field holocaust took place this afternoon. The bodies of W. A. (Ban) Phillips and Travis Owen were taken to Rural Shade were both were raised; Emmett Byrd was interred in Eureka, his former home, and Fred Craig was laid to rest at Chatfield, which was his childhood home.

The ladies of Corsicana and the Chamber of Commerce covered each of the caskets with magnificent flowers.

The remains of L. C. Sheek were sent to Dallas this afternoon and the body of W. A. Hicks will be sent to Wortham tomorrow.

The roustabout crew of 20 men working in the vicinity of the well escaped. Several teamsters and tank men were passing in and about the premises and rushed to the aid of the burning men, but the blaze had swept the bottom before they could be reached.

A negro teamster succeeded in loosening his team from the material wagon and escaped with them. The wagon and its contents were consumed.

Tragic Spectacle.
The scene about the well presented a sad and tragic spectacle when the monstrous explosion came. Both the day and the night crew consisting of twelve men had just started work a short while before. Several bystanders near the well escaped with their lives by running. It is believed that more dead bodies are in the burned area in addition to the known dead.

Men ran in every direction in a frenzy and fell when overcome.

Jimmy Meeks, oil field scout for the Humble Oil & Refining Company; E. W. Quinlin, scout for the Simms Oil Company; Ellis Hammel, drilling contractor; and DeWitt Watkins, members of the roustabout crew, did heroic work in attempting to save the men from their awful death.

Heroic Rescue Work.
Bravely defying all danger at the risk of their own lives rushed headlong to the burning prostrate forms of the groaning men in death agonies in answer to their piteous cries for help and succeeded in bringing them out. The men breathed their last as they were being carried out of the gas, smoke and fire.

Jim Ball escaped with B. B. Simmonds, N. M. Dunman and Dick Pyle. As they made their exit from the timber, Ball turned back to assist Owen. He succeeded in getting him into the open but too late to save his life. Charlie Lewis of Corsicana ran to the assistance of Bird.

Piteous cries for water went up from the two dying men as the ambulance brought them to the hospital.

Meeks, Quinlan, Hammel and Watkins returned towards the well for the other perishing men, but were unable to reach them. Their bodies had been practically reduced to ashes in the blaze which had gained headway. Waste oil in the bottom covering almost an acre upon which large trees saturated with oil had become enveloped in the frenzied inferno.

Quinlan is a world war hero. A native of New York State, he served in the French Army during the early days of the war. Later he served with the Canadian forces.

Quinlan is the possessor of several war medals. He was awarded the Medalto Militaire; the Croix Guerre, and while in the British he service he was the first American to be awarded the Victoria Cross. He received several hard jolts in the war, in the rescue work Wednesday the fumes and smoke temporarily almost overcame him.

Phone Girls Busy.
Shortly after three o’clock a man called the Johnson Drug Store from the Commercial Hotel and communicated the first news that reached Corsicana of the terrible disaster. The caller at the same time told Miss Valsey Hubbard, the operator, that he wanted every doctor available to go to the scene of the McKie well. The call was immediately referred to the chief operator. She rang the Corsicana Surgical and Medical clinic and asked that the doctors be sent. The hospital and every drug store in town were called to assist in every possible way. The undertaking parlors soon dispatched ambulances toward the fire. Emergency telephone calls from Powell, Kerens and Corsicana came pouring into the central office running as high as 2,400 calls per hour.

Frantic calls from various individuals were made in effort to locate the families of the dead and injured men.

Public memorial services will be held at the gospel tent at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., will withhold his regular revival services until after the memorial ceremonies.

The Chamber of Commerce today sent floral offerings to the families of the deceased. A suitable medal will be provided for the family of each man by the commercial organization in commemoration of their brave efforts towards the development of the oil resources of the county.

Among the members of the roustabout crew escaping are L. W. Wilkitz, E. W. Arnett, Whyne Short, J. W. Crosby, Jas. A. McDaniels, J. A. Story, Jim Ball, Ned Dumas, and Johnnie Kennon. The names of the other men have not been learned.

These men had been gathered up from various leases in the Mexia district and brought to assist in taking care of the well. The working record and the names of the men were in Mr. Allen’s pocket, and none of the surviving members are able to give the names of all the men.

Superintendent Walker of the city schools of Henrietta, and wife, father and mother of Mrs. S. P. Allen, and father of Charlie Walker, arrived in Corsicana early today.

Station Agent Wyatt and daughters of Plano, friends of the Walker family are also here.

Mr. Allen’s mother, and Miss Walker of Denton are also here. Miss Walker is a teacher in the Denton College of Industrial Arts. She is a sister of Mrs. Allen.

Notes:

---

MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN OIL FIRE

Memorial services in honor of the oil field workers who lost their lived in the big blaze at the Hughes-McKie well Wednesday will be held at the gospel tent, Eleventh street and Seventh avenue at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening.

The ceremonies will be conducted under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Mayor J. S. Eubank and members of the city administration, presidents of the Rotary, Lions, Civic, Advertising clubs, the Retail Merchants’ Association will occupy a place on the rostrum.

Every minister in town will take part in the program.

The ministers will conduct a prayer service. Hugh L. Hiett will sing.

Hon. Luther A. Johnson will make the address of condolence. Other speakers will take part.

Notes:

---

FUNERAL SUNDAY FOR REMAINING OIL FIRE VICTIMS

MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN BIG OIL FIELD FIRE WILL BE BURIED HERE

Funeral services for S. P. Allen, Charles Walker, Jim Phillips, C. M. Cooper, E. C. Cooper and L. C. Cook, fire victims of the burning Hughes-McKie oil well, will be held at the First Methodist Church at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon, according to announcement made today by W. S. Banks, attorney for the J. K. Hughes Development Company.

Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the church assisted by Rev. C. G. Vineer, pastor of the Church of Christ, will conduct the services.

The remains of the six bodies will be interred in one casket in a specially provided lot in Oakwood cemetery.

Active pallbearers will be Hon. Luther A. Johnson, Mayor J. S. Eubank, R. J. Jackson, Sam J. Jackson, John C. Calhoun, R. J. Graves, J. L. Halbert and W. H. Hastings.

The smouldering remains of the six men were recovered from the fire area of the ill-fated Hughes-McKie well several days after it caught fire May 9. They have been held at the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors pending the possible recovery of another body believed to have been undiscovered in the debris.

Seven of the perish crew were recovered from the fire shortly after the blaze started. Each were positively identified, and have been buried.

Mr. Banks stated today that the six remaining bodies had been sufficiently identified as to justify giving out the name of each. He stated the official casualty list of the J. K. Hughes Development company places the number of known dead and accounted for at 13. The list is as follows:

S. P. Allen, L. C. Cook, M. O. Turner, Charles Walker, Travis Owens, W. M. (Ban) Phillips, Jim Phillips, L. P. Sheek, W. A. Hicks, C. M. (Jack) Cooper, E. C. Cooper, Emmett G. Byrd, and Fred E. Craig.

One report carried the name of Max Meisner as among the dead and missing. Mr. Banks stated today that communication had been established with Mr. Meisner, and the Hughes company is certain he escaped injury. The company had the fire area thoroughly scorched by men clad in asbestos clothing, and no other body was found. Mr. Banks stated the company feels certain that the bodies of all men who perished in the fire has been found.

The J. K. Hughes Development Company has planned to erect a suitable monument over the grave of the six men to be buried in Oakwood cemetery in remembrance of the total number of its employees losing their lives in the big fire.

A change of plans for extinguishing the fire at the burning well late yesterday appears to have been extended the time before the blaze is stopped. W. H. McClintock has assembled a rig of his own making and patent, which he is confident will put out the fire when brought into play, but so far the apparatus has not been applied. Work was suspended at the well at 5 o’clock Friday, and nothing was done during the night. A different apparatus containing a T-joint and valve gear model has been completed, and efforts are being directed towards apply it before the McClintock machine is used.

Rain last night rendered the creek bottoms and the roads leading to the field in a very muddy condition. Transportation out from town was slow early today, which operated to cause some delay in getting work under way Saturday morning.

Although the roads were very slippery, teams and heavy trucks were on the road with tons of materials for the various new locations for drillings.

A meeting of the stockholders of the Cor-Tex Deep Well Company was held at the well just south of town at 3 o’clock this afternoon. Plans for resuming operations at the test were thoroughly gone over. Several interested individuals attended the meeting and reports are that much enthusiasm is evidenced over the proposed new operations there.

The test south of Blooming Grove to be put down by Dr. Stubbs and Dunbar spudded in at 4 o’clock. Several went out from Corsicana to see the bit take its first plunge into the surface. A local photographer was present to take a view of the rig and the crowds assembled to see the new test stared.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Saturday, May 19, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • He is listed on the monument in Oakwood but death certificate says buried in Chatfield cemetery (has a headstone at New Chatfield Cemetery)
  • h/o Willie Mae (Fluker) Craig married May 7, 1921 s/o Archie Gather Craig and Mattie Rebecca (Goggins) Craig buried in Restland Memorial Park, Dallas, Tx.

Mary Jane (Tucker) Covington
Jul 6, 1877 - Mar 5, 1917

Died Near Jester.

Mrs. Mary J. Covington, wife of Lige Covington of Jester, and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Tucker of Cook’s School House, aged 42 years, died near Jester Monday and the remains were interred at the Angus cemetery yesterday. Besides her husband and parents the deceased is survived by four children and several brothers and sisters.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday, March 7, 1917
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • w/o Elias Hershel Covington d/o John Fletcher Tucker buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery and Sarah (Hassler) Tucker buried in Campbell Elrod Cemetery
  • Buried at the Younger Cemetery, Silver City, Navarro Co., TX

Hal Flowers Parker
Aug 24, 1891 - Jan 14, 1918

PURDON MAN KILLED IN WRECK.

Remains Will Be Brought Home for Interment Tomorrow.

Of Those killed and injured in the terrible accident on the Houston and Texas Central railroad early Monday morning at Hammond, three were known here, two of the number living near Purdon.

Al Parker, who was killed, lived at Purdon and had recently gone to Orange to work in the government ship yards. His wife, who is the daughter of G. W. Tickle of Purdon, received a letter from him last Friday telling her to get ready to join him at Orange and he would send for her in a few days. It is presumed that he had changed his mind and was coming for her when he met his death. The deceased was about twenty-five years of age and was highly esteemed as an industrious and worthy young man. His parents are both dead and his young wife is the only relative the deceased had about Purdon. The remains are expected here tonight and will be interred at Purdon tomorrow.

John Ballentine, a well known farmer of Purdon community, is among the seriously injured. A telegram to his family at Purdon this morning from the railroad hospital said that he was seriously injured. Mr. Ballentine lived for many years near Blooming Grove and removed to the Purdon community a year ago. He had been to Georgia to see his venerable mother whom he had not seen in twenty years and was en route home from that trip when the accident occurred.

Lee Blocker, who was killed, and who traveled for a Houston firm, was well known here. He made his headquarters at one time at the Hotel Main and later he and his wife roomed with Mrs. Bright at the corner of Collin and Twelfth streets. The wife left here some months ago and had been in Houston. Mr. Blocker was here Friday night and went to Mrs. Bright’s and finding that Mrs. Bright had closed her house to spend some time with her daughter, Mrs. Fox, he telephoned her, saying he would go to the hotel for the night, but that he and his wife might want to rent rooms from her soon in which to do light housekeeping. The deceased was about forty years of age and leaves his wife and two children, a little girl of twelve years and a baby two weeks old. It is probable that Mr. Blocker is the man who Contracter Martinsen of the State Home saw get on the train here Friday night and again at Bryan the night of the fatal accident. Mr. Martinsen says he had frequently seen the man on the streets here, but did not know his name and says that he saw him go into the chair car at Bryan.

Dilligent inquiries among the colored people failed to throw any light on the negro Jim Wilson, reported injured. Some knew of a colored man by that name who was a laborer about town, but no one knew where he is, or whether he had gone anywhere on a train, or at least that his people did not know where he is.

Another colored man, or rather a young fellow near grown, names Jackson, is said to have come home yesterday with a sprained ankle, and that he reported that he was on the wrecked train. None of the colored people with whom the reporter talked however, knew where he lived.

Notes:

---

REMAINS ARRIVED TODAY

Man Badly Injured in Wreck Also Arrives From Houston

The remains of the late Hal Parker, who was killed in the wreck on the Houston and Texas Central railway Sunday night, reached here from Houston this morning and were taken to Purdon, where interment took place this afternoon.

The young man was killed instantly in the wreck, his skull being crushed either by something falling on him or his head striking against the engine with which the coach collided, and against which he was thrown. The body was also badly scalded by steam and hot water.

The deceased was reared near Kerens, and his father died at Trinidad only a few months ago.

John Ballantine of Purdon, who was badly burned about the face and on one of his hands, came in on the train with the body of young Parker this morning. Mr. Ballantine was accompanied home by his son, R. L. Ballantine, of Purdon, who went to his father as soon as news of the accident reached him. Mr. Ballentine told a Sun representative this morning that nothing but his strength saved him from death. He was seated, within two seats of the rear end of the chair car when the accident occurred, and it was the front end of the chair car that plunged against the engine of the freight train that was on the siding waiting for the passenger train to go by. Mr. Ballantine was pinned between two seats and as the steam began pouring in on him, with almost superhuman strength he pulled the two seats from their fastenings, seized a broken piece of iron near him, broke out a window and stuck his head through it to get fresh air. At this juncture two men seized him and drew him through the window. His exertions and the steam then overcame him, and the first thing he knew afterward was that he was lying on the ground in a pool of water. The last thing he remembered was a lady throwing a cover of some sort over him. He was taken soon afterwards along with the other injured to the railroad hospital in Houston, where he says the railroad people did all that was in human power for him and all the other injured.

Mr. Ballentine is badly blistered across the upper part of his face, his nose being one solid blister, and his eyes are badly blood-shot. He is very sore about the chest and does not know whether that is due to the jar received or his hard efforts to extricate himself.

Young Parker got on the train at Orange, and as he knew Mr. Ballantine at Purdon, took a seat with him in the rear end of the chair car and remained with him till only a short time before the accident, when he got up and went near the front end of the coach, where most of the fatalities occurred.

Mr. Ballentine reports that Mrs. Edgar Martin of Mexia, who was injured in the accident, died just as he was leaving the hospital yesterday afternoon. Mrs. Martin’s baby was killed and her husband badly hurt, but he was able to be up yesterday afternoon at the time of his wife’s death.

Notes:


Elias Hershel “Bud” Covington
Dec. 17, 1859 - Sep. 7, 1921

Died At Jester.

Bud Coving, age 70 years, died at Jester Wednesday night, and the remains were interred in the Younger cemetery yesterday. Deceased is survived by his wife and several children.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Friday, Sep 9, 1921
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • Younger Cemetery, Silver City, Navarro Co., TX
  • 1st wife Mary (Martin) Covington 2nd wife Mary Jane (Tucker) Covington 3rd wife Alice Elizabeth (Brock) Hanks-Covington buried in Oakwood cemetery s/o Elias Covington and Mary A. (Love) Covington

Earl Cleveland Stone, Jr.
Mar 15, 1917 - Jun 10, 1918

Died in Waco Monday.

The 18-months old son of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Stone of Waco, but formerly of this county, died in Waco Monday and the remains were brought here and buried in the Providence cemetery near Navarro.

Notes:


Robert H. Jeffers
Dec 8, 1883 - Oct 14, 1918

Remains Came Today

The remains of the late Robert Jeffers, son of Mr. and Mrs. I. T. Jeffers who died in El Paso some days ago, reached here today and the funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 1 o’clock at the family home with interment in Provident Cemetery, seven miles southeast of town, Rev. C. H. Booth officiating. The deceased was thirty-five years old and is survived by a little son five years old, his parents and these brothers and sisters; Mrs. Chas. Faulk, Lawton, Okla.; W. I. Jeffers, Duncan, Okla.; Allen Jeffers, San Antonio; Mrs. Harry Clowe, Rural Shade; Will Jeffers, Clowe Jeffers, Chas. Jeffers and Mrs. Lena Crouch of Corsicana.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Friday, October 18, 1918
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • s/o Isaac Thomas Jeffers & Mary Katherine “Mollie” (Sheets) Jeffers buried in Oakwood cemetery, Corsicana, Tx.

Mack M. A. Berry
Jul 22, 1863 - Aug 2, 1919

M. A. BERRY DEAD.

Remains Interred at Providence Cemetery Yesterday.

The remains of the late M. S. Berry, who died at R. D. Caton’s residence in Northeast Corsicana at 11 o’clock Saturday, were interred in the cemetery at Providence at 4 o’clock yesterday.

The deceased was 56 years and 10 days old. His wife and children are all dead. He is survived by a brother and a brother-in-law, T. L. Hill, who resides near Eureka.

The Rev. McCuiston officiated at the funeral services.

Notes:


Georgia D. (Mothershed) Ellington
May 14, 1869 - Jan 9, 1919

Died Here This Morning.

Mrs. Georgia D. Ellington, aged 50 years, wife of C. H. Ellington, died at 6 o’clock this morning at the family home, 1509 West Sixth Avenue, after a long illness from an internal cancer. The deceased is survived by her husband and three grown children. The remains will be interred in the Provident cemetery near Eureka tomorrow afternoon at 1 o’clock.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, January 9, 1919
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • w/o Charles H. “Charlie” Ellington d/o T. B. Mothershed and Josephine (Simpson) Mothershed per death certificate

B. F. Blankenship
abt. 1853 - Dec. 14, 1919

Died Near Mildred.

B. F. Blankenship, aged 66 years died near Mildred last night and the remains will be interred in the Providence cemetery tomorrow. The deceased is survived by his wife and several children.

Notes:


Seaborn Harold Powell
Jan 13, 1917 - Aug 7, 1919

LITTLE BOY DIED.

Funeral Services for Seburn Harold Powell This Afternoon.

Seburn Harold Powell, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Powell, died at 12:20 last night at the family residence, 416 East 2nd Avenue. The deceased was two years and 23 days old.

The funeral services will be held at 5:30 this afternoon from the family residence, with interment in Oakwood cemetery. Rev. Cullom H. Booth, pastor of the First Methodist Church will officiate.

Notes:


J. Lee Lonsford
Jan 1, 1860 - Jul 6, 1919

GOOD CITIZEN DIED SUDDENLY.

Funeral Was Largely Attended This Afternoon.

J. L. Lonsford, for many years a well known citizen of Corsicana, died suddenly at his home, 1004 South Seventeenth street, yesterday morning at 5 o’clock. He was on the streets Saturday in apparently good health, and retired that night feeling well. A few moments before his death he woke up suffering with his heart and a physician was summoned by he died in a few minutes.

The deceased was 59 years, 6 months and 5 days old at the time of his death, and is survived by his wife and one son. The deceased was a man of strong convictions and manly impulses, and stood for all that was good to his community. He had long been active and zealous member of the Methodist church and he will be missed as a good citizen and faithful husband and father and a true friend. The funeral took place this afternoon at 5 o’clock from the home with interment in Oakwood. Rev. Pat Leach, pastor of the Methodist church at Kerens, and Rev. R. A. Crosby of the Eleventh avenue Methodist church, performed the last sad rites, and J. H. Pugh, Lawrence Treadwell, W. M. Huggins, Wiley Smith, Chas. Borg and R. Mitchell acted as pallbearers. Many friends were present and there were many beautiful floral offerings.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Monday, July 7, 1919
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • h/o Susan Virginia Ella (Thomas) Lonsford married Mar. 15, 1895 s/o W. L. Lonsford and unk (Nicholson) Lonsford per death certificate

Susan Virginia Ella (Thomas) Lonsford
Jan 14, 1862 - Mar 10, 1924

Mrs. Lonsford Died Monday Afternoon.

Mrs. Susan V. E. Lonsford, widow of the late Lee Lonsford, died at her home, 1004 South Seventeenth street, at 5 o’clock yesterday afternoon, after a long illness, and the remains were interred in Oakwood this afternoon at 3 o’clock, with Rev. Ilion T. Jones officiating, and Geo. Kuykendall, W. C. Ralston, J. H. Bryant, John Cardwell, Morgan Holloway and Judge H. B. Daviss acting as pallbearers . There was a good attendance, and many pretty floral offerings. The deceased was 62 years of age and had lived in Corsicana many years.

Notes:


Mary Dee (Anderson) McAfee
Aug 6, 1893 - Jan 8, 1919


Mary Dee Mcafee with children, Milton Anderson McAfee & Marie McAfee. c. 1918 Photo not part of obituary

Funeral Took Place This Afternoon.

The funeral of the late Mrs. Mary D. McAfee, wife of Terry McAfee, took place from the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors at 3 o’clock this afternoon, and was largely attended and there were many beautiful floral offerings. Rev. C. H. Booth officiated and Grover Jennings, Cecil Foster, Sterling Hornbeck, Pierce Horger, Robt. Garrett and Preston McKinney acted as pallbearers.

Notes:


INFANT DAUGHTER Metcalf
B&D Jan 29, 1919

Infant Died Here

The infant of A. S. Metcalf died at the family home, 216 North Eleventh Street last night, and the remains were interred in Oakwood this afternoon.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday, Jan 29, 1919
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • d/o Albert Sidney Metcalf and Mattie D. (Roberts) Metcalf; Alberts's first wife is Augusta (Smith) Metcalf, she died Dec 29, 1915

James “Jim” Henry Lawson
Feb 20, 1907 - Jan 11, 1919

Died at P. and S. Hospital

James Lawson, the 11-year-old son of M. Lawson, died at the P. and S. Hospital late Saturday afternoon and the remains were interred in Oakwood today.

Notes:


Mary Virginia (Cheney) Welch
Feb 23, 1867 - Jan 10, 1948

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MRS. J. W. WELCH SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Mrs. J. W. Welch, pioneer Corsicana resident, died at the home of her son, J. Preston Welch, city secretary, 1516 Maplewood, early Saturday morning, following an illness of several years.

Funeral services will be held from the McCammon chapel Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock with interment in Oakwood cemetery. The rites will be conducted by Dr. Jared I. Cartlidge, pastor of the First Baptist church, of which Mrs. Welch was a long-time member.

Native of Newborn, Ga., the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Cheney, Mrs. Welch came to Corsicana when 18 years of age.

Surviving are her son, a brother, J. Owen Cheney, Navarro; a niece, Mrs. Dorothy Sweatman, Corsicana teache, who was reared by Mrs. Welch, a number of other nieces and nephews and other relatives.

Pallbearers will be Byron Harwell, L. C. Cook, Will Taylor, C. C. McClung, R. R. Cocke, Van Cheney and Dick Cheney.

Notes:

--

RITES HELD SUNDAY FOR MRS. J. W. WELCH; BURIAL IN OAKWOOD

Funeral services for Mrs. J. W. Welch, pioneer Corsicana resident, who died at the home of her son, J. Preston Welch, city secretary, 1516 Maplewood, early Saturday morning, were held Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock from the McCammon chapel. The rites were conducted by Dr. Jared I. Cartlidge, pastor of the First Baptist church of which she has been a long-time member. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

Native of Georgia, Mrs. Welch came to Corsicana when 18 years of age with her parents, the late Dr. and Mrs. J. N. Cheney.

Surviving are her son, a brother, J. Owen Cheney, Navarro; a niece, Miss Dorothy Sweatmon, Corsicana teacher, who was reared by Mrs. Welch, and a number of other relatives.

Pallbearers were Byron Harwell, L. C. Cook, Will Taylor, C. C. McClung, R. R. Cocke, Van Cheney and Dick Cheney.

Notes:


Lucile Orange
Feb 9, 1911 - Aug 27, 1919

Death of Little Girl.

Lucile Orange, the 7 year-old daughter of A. L. Orange, who lives in the Thorp addition, died last night and the remains were interred in the Oakwood cemetery this afternoon. Rev. R. A. Crosby officiated and the members of the little girl’s Sunday School class of the Eleventh Avenue Methodist Church acted as pallbearers. The little girl fell from a tree some two or three weeks ago and hurt her back and it is thought that the injury then received developed a fever that finally ended her life.

Notes:


Ellen “Ella” (Hays) Patton-Harle
Jan 23, 1851 - Feb 7, 1919

Remains Interred Today.

The remains of the late Mrs. R. B. Harle were laid to rest in Oakwood at 3 o’clock this afternoon, the funeral taking place from the home of P. P. Headrick, South Eighteenth Street and Twelfth Avenue. The pall bearers were B. H. Woods, Sam M. Kerr, T. P. Kerr, A. J. Wareing, N. L. Benson and Tom Redden, and a large number attended the last sad rites. In addition to the relatives mentioned in the Sun Yesterday, the deceased is survived by one brother, Cade Hayes, a former resident here, but now of Dallas.

Notes:

------

Venerable Lady Dead

Mrs. R. B. Harle, for many years a resident of Corsicana, aged 63 years, died at the P. and S. hospital last night, and the funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon, with interment in Oakwood. The deceased is survived by three grown children, Mrs. Mortie Headrick of Corsicana; Earl Harle of Cleburne; and Clyde Harle who is a traveling salesman. The deceased was a half sister of the late Mrs. Joel A. Kerr, and an aunt of Messrs. Mortie, A. H. and Ray Kerr. The deceased had many friends among the elder residents of Corsicana, and was highly esteemed by all who knew her. The funeral will be held tomorrow at 2 p.m.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Friday, February 7, 1919
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • 1st husband William G. Patton married Feb. 12, 1868 & 2nd husband Robert Baldwin Harle married Mar. 4, 1878; d/o Thomas Hays

Emilie/Amelia (Bunert) Frey
Oct 27, 1858 - Nov 17, 1945

Mrs. E. Frey Died Saturday Night; Funeral Sunday

Mrs. E. Frey, aged 81 years, died at the family home, 1305 East Seventh avenue Saturday night at 9 o’clock.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 4 o’clock from the McCammon Funeral Chapel. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery. The rites were conducted by Rev. Robert Kennaugh, rector of St. John’s Episcopal church.

Mrs. Frey had resided in Corsicana most of her life.

Surviving are a son, Albert W. Frey, Corsicana; a sister, Mrs. Bertha Bunert, Corsicana, and six grandchildren.

Pallbearers were W. V. Mowlam, Everett Hall, Sam Crain, W. P. McCammon, H. D. Johnson, Pitt Franklin, H. T. Jackson, and F. W. Smith.

Mrs. Frey was a native of Toledo, Ohio, and came to Corsicana in 1878. She was married to the late Emil Frey in 1883.

Notes:


Emil Frey
Jan 24, 1856 - Mar 22, 1935

EMIL FREY DIED HOME ON FRIDAY; FUNERAL SUNDAY

VETERAN PHOTOGRAPHER HAS BEEN RESIDENT CITY HALF CENTURY

Emil Frey, aged 79 years, resident of Corsicana for 53 years, retired photographer and well-known violinist, died at his home, 1304 East Seventh avenue Friday morning at 3 o’clock. The rites will be held from the family home Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock with burial in Oakwood cemetery. The services will be conducted by Rev. H. J. Ellis, rector of St. John’s Episcopal church.

Mr. Frey had been in the photography business for 47 years prior to his retirement and for many years conducted the leading business of his profession in this section of the country.

Surviving are his wife, a son, Albert Frey, Corsicana, and five grandchildren.

The rites will be directed by the Sutherland-McCammon Funeral Home.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Friday, March 22, 1935
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • Born in Germany h/o Emilie/Amelia (Bunert) Frey married Mar. 30, 1883 s/o Emil Frey per death certificate
  • (Ed, I have seen this guy’s name on so many of the old photos of Corsicana and I bet you have some—the 3rd article tells more about his photos—he was a photographer, violinist and also a artist)

--

EMIL FREY TO BE BURIED SUNDAY IN OAKWOOD CEMETERY

PROMINENT RETIRED PHOTOGRAPHER AND MUSICIAN DIED EARLY FRIDAY

Funeral rites for Emil Frey, aged 79 years, resident of Corsicana for 35 years, retired photographer and well known musician, who died at his home 1304 East Seventh avenue, Friday morning at 3 o’clock, will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock from the family home with burial in Oakwood cemetery. The rites will be conducted by Rev. H. J. Ellis, rector of St. John’s Episcopal church. Mr. Frey formerly was one of the best known photographers in this section and was a photographer 47 years prior to his retirement several years ago.

Surviving are his wife, a son, Albert Frey, Corsicana, and five grandchildren.

Pallbearers will be S. M. Kerr, A. B. Douglas, J. Y. Stewart, A. W. Levermann, Sam Crane, W. P. McCammon, Wm. V. Mowlam and Bert Nichol.

The funeral will be directed by the Sutherland-McCammon Funeral Home.

Notes:

--

Passing of E. Frey Brings Interesting History to Light

It will, no doubt, be of interest to the friends and acquaintances of Mr. Emil Frey, who passed away early Friday morning and was laid to rest Sunday afternoon in Oakwood cemetery, to know something of his 59 years spent in Corsicana.

Mr. Frey was born in Mainz, Germany, January 23, 1856, coming to America when only 15 years old, and to Corsicana five years later, in 1876.

He took out his final naturalization papers in 1887, sworn to before Judge Rufus Hardy and H. P. West, Sam A. Frost being the judge of the Thirteenth district at that time.

He, like his father before him, was a finished musician. He organized the first string band and brass band in Corsicana, and taught a large class of pupils.

At this time, being an artist with pencil and brush as well as in music, he took up the creation of pictures as a hobby, which led to photography, his life work from which he retired in 1924.

Pioneer in Photography.
During these 48 years, he saw photography advance from the time that he made his own materials for tintypes and Daguerteotypes, to the production of the motion pictures.

On March 28, 1854, he married Miss Amelia Bunert, who survives him. He is also survived by a son, Albert Frey of this city, three grandsons, Edward Kuesel and Herbert Albert Frey of Corsicana, and Emil Frey of Livengood, Alaska; two granddaughters, Imogene Frey, Corsicana and Marjorie Frey, Chicago, and a niece, Mrs. H. Bauer of Kansas City.

It was Mr. Frey’s request that a violin solo be played at his funeral, so Mrs. Finis Farr was asked to play. She chose Kreisler’s “Old Refrain,” as Mr. Frey, in writing her a letter after hearing her play over the radio several years ago, mentioned that number in particular as having been enjoyed.

Out of town friends here for the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Hanley and Mr. and Mrs. Roy Layton of Simsboro; H. Gross and family of Athens, and Mrs. Clayton Browns and Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Fitch of Dallas.

Notes:

--

Jan 24, 1856 - Mar 22, 1935

PIONEER CORSICANA BUSINESS MAN WAS BURIED ON SUNDAY

Funeral rites for Emil Frey, aged 79 years, retired photographer and pioneer resident of Corsicana, who died Friday morning at 3 o’clock, were held from the family home, 1304 East Seventh avenue, Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock with burial in
Oakwood cemetery. The services were conducted by Rev. H. J. Ellis rector of St. John’s Episcopal church. Mr. Frey had resided in Corsicana for 53 years. He was a well-known violinist.

Surviving are his wife, a son, Albert Frey, Corsicana; and five grandchildren.

Pallbearers were S. M. Kerr, A. B. Douglas, J. Y Stewart, A. W. Levermann, Sam Crane, W. P. McCammon, Wm. V. Mowlam and Bert Nicol.

The funeral was directed by Sutherland-McCammon Funeral Home.

Notes:


Marion (Bunert) Casey
Jul 2, 1857 - Oct 22, 1940

MRS. MARION CASEY DIED MONDAY NIGHT; FUNERAL ON TUESDAY

Mrs. Marion Bunert Casey died at her home at 1305 East Seventh avenue Monday night. Funeral services will be held from the family home at 5 o’clock this (Tuesday) afternoon. Rev. H. J. Ellis, rector emeritus of the St. John’s Episcopal church, will conduct the rites. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

Mrs. Casey was a native of Ohio but came to Corsicana when only a child and had resided here since that time.

Surviving are two sisters, Miss Bertha Bunert and Mrs. E. Frey, both of Corsicana, and other relatives.

Sutherland-McCammon will direct the arrangements.

Notes:

---

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MRS. CASEY WERE HELD LATE TUESDAY

Funeral services for Mrs. Marion Bunert Casey, who died Monday night, were held Tuesday afternoon at 5 o’clock from the family residence, 1305 East Seventh avenue.

Rev. H. J. Ellis, rector emeritus of the St. John’s Episcopal church, conducted the rites. Burial was in the Oakwood cemetery.

Mrs. Casey was a native of Ohio but came to Corsicana when only a child and had resided here since that time.

Surviving are two sisters, Miss Bertha Bunert and Mrs. E. Frey, both of Corsicana, and other relatives.

Sutherland-McCammon directed the arrangements.

Notes:

---

Relatives, Friends Attended Last Rites For Mrs. Mary Casey

Among the many sorrowing friends attending the impressive funeral services Tuesday afternoon at 5 o’clock for the late Mrs. Mary Casey, that were held at the family home on East Seventh Avenue by the Rev. H. J. Ellis, rector emeritus of St. John’s Episcopal Church, were Athens relatives of the family, and Mrs. E. A. Johnson of Dallas, a very close friend of the deceased and her family and her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Browne. Heartfelt sympathy is extended the bereaved loved ones by their large circle of friends.

Notes:


Harriett Jane “Hattie” (Greenwood) Caldwell
Dec 5, 1851 - Jul 6, 1920

Funeral Was Held This Afternoon

The remains of the late Mrs. Hattie Caldwell reached here last night from Fort Worth, accompanied by her son, Rufus Caldwell and wife, A. G. Caldwell and her son-in-law and daughter Mrs. Blount Hodge and the funeral took place this afternoon at 4 o’clock from the home of A. G. Caldwell, 1555 West Third Avenue with interment Oakwood. Rev. B. W. Vining officiated and the following were pallbearers: Active, Geo. E. Jester, R. N. Elliott, W. B. Sweatmon, C. L. Matthews, J. S. Millerman and Byron Cheney. Honorary, W. P. McCammon, C. L. Jester, E. S. McGee, W. M. Peck, B. K. Duncan, Geo. F. Miller, C. E. Lee, J. L. Halbert, C. H. DeLafosse and J. H. Millerman.

The last sad rites were largely attended and there were many beautiful floral offerings.

Notes:


Thomas Harvey Robinson
May 23, 1860 - Nov 6, 1920

GOOD CITIZEN PASSED AWAY.

Remains Were Interred in Oakwood Yesterday.

Thomas H. Robinson, aged sixty years and five months, and for most of his life a resident of Navarro county, died at his home, 526 North Nineteenth Street, late Saturday afternoon after a long illness, and the funeral took place from the home at 4:30 yesterday afternoon and was largely attended and there were many floral offerings. The services at the home were conducted by Revs. J. Walter Simpson of Corsicana and W. L. Patterson of Eureka, and the official members of the United Presbyterian church as pall bearers, and the services at the grave were concluded by the Odd Fellows. The deceased who was in all respects an honored citizen, is survived by his wife and several grown children.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Monday, Nov 8, 1920
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • 1st wife Mary Caroline (Bonner) Robinson married Jan. 8, 1882 2nd wife Ettie (Foster) Robinson married June 16, 1898 s/o James Bonner Robinson and Elizabeth Ann “Eliza” (Bonner) Robinson
  • Oakwood cemetery

Lela Charlotte (Wallace) Marr
Apr 12, 1888 - Oct 14, 1953

October 17, 1953
CORSICANA, Texas. - Mrs. Marr's Funeral Is Held at Corsicana Funeral services for Mrs. W. C. (Judge) Marr, 65, were held at the Corley Chapel Thursday.
Surviving are her husband, two sons, C. E. Marr and Clyde Marr, both of Corsicana; three daughters, Mrs. Betty Jo Benefield of Dallas and Mrs. Zelma Hampton and Mrs. Zella Conner of Corsicana; two brothers, A. B. Wallace of Portales, N.M., and Henry W. Wallace of Phoenix, Ariz.; three sisters, Mrs. Ella Wilbanks of Portalkes, N.M.; Mrs. Lizzie Fluker of Troup and Mrs. Mamie Furrah of Amarillo; fifteen grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Notes:


Robert Lee Marr
September 9, 1935 - July 21, 2014
Mesquite, Texas

Robert Lee Marr was born September 9, 1935 in Corsicana, Texas and passed away July 21, 2014 in Mesquite, Texas.

Preceded in death by his parents, Chester Elmer and Allie Bell Marr; sisters, Helen Adams, Deloris Farmer and grand daughter, Theresa Adams. He is survived by his [....] Annie Mae Marr.

A graveside service will be held July 29, 2014 at Chapel Garden Mausoleum, Restland Memorial Park.


Rhonda Cherie (Cacy) Hayes-Blythe
Oct 30, 1954 - Feb 4, 2014

CACY, RHONDA Rhonda Cherie Cacy of Lubbock, formerly of Albuquerque, New Mexico, passed away on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at the age of 59. She was born October 30, 1954 in Albuquerque to Lee and Ruby (McAfee) Cacy. She was a business owner and loved making jewelry and pinatas which she sold. She was a gifted artist who enjoyed hunting, fishing, and riding motorcycles. Rhonda was a member of Netherwood Park Church of Christ in Albuquerque. Those left to cherish her memory are her husband, Mark Blythe; daughter, Michelle Hayes of Blue Springs, Missouri; son, David Hayes of Grain Valley, Missouri; mother, Ruby Cacy of Lubbock; two sisters, Diana Beeson of Lubbock and Yvonne Cacy of Farmington, New Mexico; and three grandchildren, Jennifer, Jordan and Cole Hayes. Rhonda was preceded in death by her father, Lee, and grandparents, S. E. and Zora McAfee. Memorial services are scheduled for 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 8, 2014 at Combest Family Memorial Chapel. Please celebrate the life of Rhonda by visiting www.combestfamily funeralhomes.com

Notes:

  • Find A Grave Memorial #124662469
  • Rhonda Cacy was born in 1954. Rhonda currently lives in Lubbock . Before that, she lived in Albuquerque , NM from 2002 to 2012. After high school, she went to The University of New Mexico (1980-1980) in , . she attended college from 80 to 80. sandia high school albuquerque new mexico (1971-1972) in , . she attended college from 71 to 72. 

 


Bamma Louise (Fuller) Kennedy
Mar 25, 1925 - Apr 9, 2015

Louise grew up on a farm between Frost and Blooming Grove. She was born to Olen Marvin and Lillie Beaird Fuller and she shared that home with younger brother Olen Marvin “Buddy” Fuller Jr. She graduated Frost High School in 1943 and moved to Dallas to attend Business School. She met and married Leslie John Kennedy in 1945 while he was on leave from WWII. When he returned they settled in Grand Prairie, Tx, where they had four children. Louise worked in her early years for LTV Corporation as an executive assistant and then in 1965 became a successful director in Mary Kay Cosmetics.

Louise was a wonderful daughter to her parents and always saw to their needs till they passed. She enjoyed family events and all the family loved her cooking. She was a wonderful seamstress sewing many of her children’s clothes and later making beautiful square dance outfits as well as gowns. Late in life she started square dancing and ball room dancing loving music, exercise and all the friends she made. She adored her 4 children, nine grandchildren, sixteen great and twin great great grandchildren.

She survived members of her family:
Son, Larry Boyd Kennedy, 1948 - 1969
Husband, Leslie John Kennedy, 1925- 1977
Daughter, Sherry Kennedy Johnson 1947 - 2008

Sandra Kennedy Neese 1953 and Debbie Kennedy Jenkins 1956 live in San Marcos and New Braunfels area.

Louise most wanted people to know that she loved God. She would share her knowledge with most anyone she came into contact with. She knew her scripture and wanted everyone to know the loving grace of knowing God as your Lord and Savior. She now resides with him and she is greatly missed.

Notes:


Robert Doyle "Bob" Carroll
Sept 10, 1965 - Apr 19, 2016

Mr. Bob Carroll, 50, of Corsicana passed away on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 at Navarro Regional Hospital in Corsicana.  "May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in Him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit." Romans 15:13

On Sept. 10, 1965, Bob was born to Rudy F. Carroll and Billie Joyce Morris Carroll in Crockett, Texas.
Bob graduated from Corsicana High School in 1984 and began his college career at Navarro College before transferring to Texas A&M University.
He graduated from Texas A&M in 1988. He was a proud "Fightin' Texas Aggie." After graduation he moved to Houston and was employed by Ralston Purina.  In 1991 Bob took a job in Dallas working for Western Union. He later moved back to Corsicana and was hired as a Loan Officer/Vice President at Community National Bank in October of 2010. He served his customers proudly.

Bob's pride and joy was his children. He enjoyed teaching them, encouraging them and loving them. He and his son Cody traveled all over the state of Texas showing llamas, goats and sheep. These were very special times for Cody and Bob.

When Rylie Catherine was born in 2006, she quickly became a daddy's girl. He supported her in all she did, from dance to soccer to showing animals.

Bob's stepchildren, Anna and Owen Abbe, joined his family in October
2014 when he married their mother Susan. Owen always challenged Bob with his inquisitive nature and curious mind. Anna and Bob enjoyed playing jokes on each other and making each other laugh.

Bob was an encourager, a supporter and a servant. He was a member of First United Methodist Church in Blooming Grove. He served as treasurer of the South Central Llama Association where he sought to revive the youth involvement in llama showing. He also served on various committees and boards in Navarro County that supported youth and agriculture in the area.

Bob was a mentor to those around him. He loved to teach and encourage others to do their best. He was never too busy to help someone. Bob was passionate about his family and he will be missed by many. Especially Susan, Cody, Rylie, Anna, Owen, Rudy and Billie.

He was preceded in death by his grandparents and uncles, W. E. Carroll and Dr. J D Carroll.  He is survived by his wife, Susan Carroll of Corsicana; son, Cody Carroll of Bryan College Station; daughter, Rylie Catherine Carroll of Corsicana; step daughter, Anna Abbe of Corsicana; step son, Owen Abbe of Corsicana; parents, Rudy and Billie Carroll of Corsicana; father and mother-in-law, Robert and Becky Thurston of Corsicana; sister-in-law, Gayla Carroll and husband Ray of Corsicana; aunts, Frances Holdeman of Mansfield and Donna Penney and husband Gary of Lorena; uncle, Dr. Ray Dean Carroll of Corsicana, and numerous cousins.

Visitation with the family will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, April 22, 2016 at Corley Funeral Home.  Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 23, 2016 at First Baptist Church with the Rev. Kevin Diggs and Dr. Steven Bell officiating.

Interment will follow in the Rose Hill Cemetery.

Pallbearers will be Michael Hickerson, Matt Wallen, Dean Pritchett, Andy Penney, Matt Penney, and Ray Carroll.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the South Central Llama Association, PO Box 163654, Austin, TX 78716 or to Blooming Grove United Methodist Church, PO Box 37, Blooming Grove, Texas 76626.

Notes:


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Edward L. Williams & Barbara Knox