Obituaries from
Navarro County, Texas


HOME



 


David Thomas Neal
Feb 3, 1862 - Nov 1, 1923

A Good Citizen Passes.

David T. Neal, aged 62 years, and for twenty-four years a resident of Corsicana, died at his home, 618 West Tenth avenue this morning after an illness that lasted many months. The funeral will take place from the home at 2:30 tomorrow afternoon with Rev. A. E. Carraway of the Eleventh Avenue Methodist church officiating. Surviving the deceased are his wife and one daughter, Mrs. Geo . Yates, and one sister, Mrs. R. D. Caton. For several years the deceased assisted Mr. C. B. Sutherland in the care of the Oakwood cemetery and for the past two or three years he had been in care of the Corsicana public school buildings, and in all of these he did his duty well and faithfully. Corsicana had no better citizen than Dave Neal, and he leaves behind him a life well spent, and a host of friends who sorrow with his relatives in their bereavement.

The following were the pall bearers:

Active—R. M Lockhart, R. P. McEntire, F. A. Williamson, W. C. Scarbrough, H. M. Montgomery, C. A. Langston.

Honorary—Dr. L. E. Kelton, Dr. W. T. Shell, Dr. Wilson David, Dr. T. A. Miller, H. D. Fillers, W. P. McCammon, S. W. Burdine, J. G. Comfort, Hugh Stewart, J. D. Hamilton, S. B. Jordan, S. W. King, Edgar Metcalf, Burt rosson, John Walling, Bert Wimberly, J. K. Hook, Edgar Wareing.

Notes:


Mary Delia (Story) Bunch
May 2, 1887 - Oct 6, 1923

Mrs. C. L. Bunch Died Last Night.

Mrs. Delia Bunch, aged 36 years, wife of C. L. Bunch, 1032 South Seventeenth street, died last night after an illness of several days. She leaves a babe of only a few days besides her husband and numerous other relatives.

Mrs. Bunch was a good woman and loved and respected by all who knew her. The funeral took place this afternoon from the late residence and was conducted by Rev. A. E. Carraway, pastor of the Eleventh Avenue Methodist Church. Interment was in Oakwood cemetery and a large number of friends and relatives followed the remains to their last resting place and covered the grave with a profusion of beautiful flowers which attested in a slight but touching way to the love and esteem in which the deceased was held by those who had known her in life.

The sympathy of a wide circle of friends goes out to the husband and the aged aunt, Miss Martha Story who practically reared Mrs. Bunch and has made her home with her for the past several years. A brother, Tom Story, also survives the deceased.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Saturday, October 6, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • 1st husband James Andrew Haley married May 8, 1912 2nd husband Charles Lee Bunch married Dec. 20, 1922; d/o Thomas Jefferson “Tom” Story & Elizabeth Symanthie (Echols) Story

Charles Lee Bunch
Apr 15, 1885 - Dec 11, 1957

Friday, Services for C. L. Bunch

Funeral services for Charles Lee Bunch, 72, retired farmer, 1014 South Seventeenth street were held from the McCammon Chapel Friday at 2 p.m. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

Bunch died of a heart attack at the family home Wednesday afternoon. He was a native of Navarro county.

The rites were conducted by Rev. B. Thomas Tribble, pastor of the Central Methodist church assisted by Claude B. Holcomb, minister of the Fifth Avenue Church of Christ.

Bunch was a member of the Methodist church.

Surviving are his wife of Corsicana; seven sons, Lloyd N. Bunch, Corpus Christi; Clyde W. and Charles H. Bunch, both of Fort Worth; Cyrl L. Bunch, Houston; Charles W. Brown, Little Rock, Ark.; Alvin C. Brown, Los Angeles; and James E. Brown, Oglesby, Texas; two daughters, Mrs. John H. Paschal, Corsicana; 12 grandchildren, four brothers, Fred A. Bunch, Corsicana; Bonnie C. Bunch, Marshall; Joe and W. J. Bunch, both of Fort Worth; a sister, Mrs. JH. J. Baker, Corsicana, and other relatives.

Pallbearers were Fred A. Bunch, Bonnie C. Bunch, Joe and William J. Bunch, A. B. Tanner and W. M. Mageors.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Friday, December 13, 1957
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • 1st wife Lena May (Ferris) Bunch buried in Campbell Elrod Cemetery 2nd wife Mary Delia (Story) Haley-Bunch Married Dec. 30, 1922 3rd wife Emma Lovenia (Shirley) Brown-Bunch s/o Erasmus Berry Bunch and Martha Matilda “Mattie’ (Mitchell) Bunch

--

Friday Services For C. L. Bunch

Funeral services for Charles Bunch, 72, retired farmer, 1014 South Seventeenth street, were held from the McCammon Chapel Friday at 2 p.m. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

Bunch died of a heart attack at the family home Wednesday afternoon. He was a native of Navarro county.

The rites were conducted by Rev. B. Thomas Tribble, pastor of the Central Methodist church, assisted by Claude R. Holcomb, minister of the Fifth Avenue Church of Christ.

Bunch was a member of the Methodist church.

Surviving are his wife of Corsicana; seven sons, Loyd N. Bunch, Corpus Christi; Clyde W. and Charles H. Bunch, both of Fort Worth; Cyrl L. Bunch, Houston; Charles W. Brown, Little Rock, Ark; Alvin C. Brown, Los Angeles, and James E. Brown, Oglesby, Texas; two daughters, Mrs. Johnny Steger, Chicago, and Mrs. T. H. Paschal, Corsicana; 12 grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, four brothers, Fred A. Bunch, Corsicana; Bennie C. Bunch, Marshall; Joe and W. J. Bunch, both of Fort Worth; a sister, Mrs. J. J. Baker, Corsicana, and other relatives.

Pallbearers were Fred A. Bunch, Bonnie C. Bunch, Joe and William J. Bunch, A. B. Tanner and W. M. Mageors.

Notes:


Emma Lovenia (Shirley) Brown-Bunch
Sep 29, 1890 - Jun 25, 1971

Bunch

Funeral services for Mrs. Emma Bunch, 80, of Dallas are to be today at 1 p.m. in Dallas in Rogers-Gill Chapel. Graveside services are to be conducted at 3 p.m. in Oakwood cemetery of Corsicana with the Rev. C. L. Stanley and the Rev. Larry Gilbert officiating.

Mrs. Bunch died Friday in Dallas.

She is survived by two sons, C. Lee Bunch and James E. Brown; one daughter, Mrs. T. H. Paschal; three sisters, Mrs. Dora Cotton, Mrs. Ann McCuthchen and Mrs. Ellie Davis; three brothers, Stoney Shirley, Joel Shirley and Luther Shirley; seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Notes:


Amanda Elizabeth (Dingler) Harwell
Mar 4, 1872 - Jul 12, 1923

Died This Morning.

Mrs. Elizabeth Harwell, aged 51 years, died this morning at 10:25 o’clock at the family home on North Seventh street. The funeral will take place Friday morning at 10 o’clock with burial in Oakwood cemetery. The Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the First Methodist church will conduct the services.

The deceased is survived by three sons and two daughters, the sons being Richard, Percy and Harrison Harwell, all of Corsicana, and the daughters are Misses Pearl and Willie Harwell also of this city. She is also survived by her husband C. P. Harwell.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, July 12, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • w/o Charles Park Harwell buried in Algoma Cemetery, Marshall, Texas d/o William Blanche Dingler buried in Plesant Retreat Cem., Tyler, Tx. and Emily (Cook) Dingler-Thompson buried in Oakwood cemetery, Hamilton, Texas

Harold Lively
Died Oct 23, 1923

Died At State Home.

Harold Lively, aged two and a half years, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Lively, of the State Home, died there last night after two weeks illness and the funeral took place from the First Baptist Church here this afternoon at 3 o’clock, Rev. E. P. Kennedy officiating, and interment in Oakwood cemetery. Many friends attended the funeral and there were many pretty flowers.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday, October 24, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • (there is a 2 yr old (est) "Harold Lively" buried at the Palestine City Cemetery in Palestine, Anderson Co., TX); Find-A-Grave #53794783; Also a Walter Talmadge Lively there so I assume Harold is actually buried there, or at least there is a marker for him there.

Lell D. Callens
Feb 11, 1892 - Dec 13, 1923


L. D. Callens Died At His Home Today

L. D. (Sam) Callens, aged 31 years, died at his home at 223 West Collin street today following a short illness of pneumonia.

The deceased was a veteran of the world war, being one of the first boys from this city to join the army. He served 13 months with the expeditionary forces with the 90th division and a part of this time he was with the army of occupation.

He was at the time of his death, in the employ of the American Bakery and he also held a waiters union card. The American Bakery will close during the funeral hours tomorrow.

Funeral services will be held at the residence at 3 o’clock tomorrow afternoon and will be conducted by Rev. D. A. Chisholm, pastor of the Eleventh Avenue Methodist church and Rev. W. A. Sanders, pastor of the Methodist Protestant church. Interment will be in Oakwood cemetery. All ex-service men are named as honorary pallbearers and as many as possible are expected to attend the funeral.

The deceased is survived by three sisters, Miss Myrtie Callens, Mrs. E. T. Barnes, and Mrs. Zelma Hederick and three brothers, R. L. James and Guy Callens all of this city. One sister-in-law, Mrs. G. R. Callens of Electra will be here to attend the funeral.

Notes:


Mary (Malone) Hill
Sep 18, 1840 - May 19, 1923

Died Here Saturday Night.

Mrs. Mary Hill, aged 83 years, died Saturday night at the home of her son-in-law, A. Highnote, 400 East Tenth avenue, and the remains were interred in Oakwood this afternoon at 3 o’clock, Rev. C. A. chasten officiating. There was a large attendance at the last sad rites and many pretty flowers.

The deceased had lived here for eighteen years, and is survived by three daughters and one son.

Notes:

---

Mrs. Mary Hill Dead.

Mrs. Mary Hill, mother of Mrs. Abe Highnote passed away last Saturday evening at 8 o’clock at the residence of her daughter at 400 East Tenth street. The funeral was conducted Monday afternoon from the residence of Mr. Highnote at 3 o’clock, conducted by Rev. C. A. Chasteen, pastor of the First Christian Church. Deceased had been a member of the Christian church for thirty-five years.

Note:

---

In Memory of Mrs. Mary Hill.

Mrs. Mary Hill, aged 85 years, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Abe Highnote, May 18, 1923 . Mary Malone was born at Atlanta, Georgia, September 15, 1839, and was married to Edward Hill. To this union were born eight children, one girl, and one boy dying in infancy, and one daughter dying when a young woman. Her husband died over 40 years ago, leaving her to raise her young family of three daughters and one son who mourn a loving mother. They are: Maggie Quick of San Angelo, Ida Cornish of Murfeesboro, Ark., Elijah Hill of Hall county, Mack Hill of DeQueen, Ark., and Mrs. Lula Highnote of Corsicana, the youngest, with whom she has made her home.

Owing to illness in their families none of the out of town children could be present at the funeral which was held from the Highnote home, 400 East Tenth avenue.

Grandma Hill was a member of the First Christian church here for the past 18 years. Rev. C. A. Chasteen held a short, but impressive service at the home, assisted by a quartette of singers from the church choir. And many friends followed the body to its final resting place in Oakwood cemetery.

It is sad indeed to chronicle the departure from life of the one you love so well, and when her life meant so much of comfort and joy to us. But the Reapers gather both young and old.

Mother has gone to the beautiful shore,
Mourn her not, children, her trials are o’er;
Hearing long dulled earth’s discord and pain
Thrills to whisper of joy in the heavenly strains.

We wish to thank the many friends for their kindness, and the floral tributes before she departed to the great realm beyond.

Written by Esther Hill.

Notes:


Myrtle Gertrude (Etchieson) Ayers
Apr 2, 1895 - Jul 22, 1975

Mrs. Ayers

Services will be held Thursday at 3:30 p.m. in the Corley Funeral Chapel for Mrs. Myrtle Ayers, 80, of Corsicana, who died Tuesday in Memorial Hospital.

Reverends Comer Baker and T. F. Donald will officiate and burial will be in Oakwood cemetery.

A native of Center Point, Ark., she had lived in Corsicana for 72 years. She was an active member of the Assembly of God Church.

She is survived by her husband, W. L. Ayers, of Corsicana; one son, W. L. Ayers, Jr., of Falfurrias; three daughters, Mrs. Verna L. Cook and Mrs. John Higgenbotham, both of Corsicana, and Mrs., W. M. Daniel of Dallas; five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren; and one sister, Mrs. Verna L. DeWitt of Wichita Falls.

Pallbearers will be Frank Merrell, Shirley Goines, Robert Daniel, Alton Justiss, Chick Reed, Sam Nagy, Buddy Starks and Irving Daniel.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday, July 23, 1975
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • w/o Wilson Lenige Ayers, Sr; d/o D. L. Etchieson & Lula (Hill) Etchieson-Highnote (Lula buried in Forrest Lawn Cemetery, Los Angeles, Calif. Per death certificate)

Lucy C. (unk) Ayers
Jan 24, 1854 - Jun 6, 1943

RITES HELD MONDAY FOR MRS. LUCY AYERS WHO DIED ON SUNDAY

Funeral services for Mrs. Lucy Ayers, age 89 years, who died Sunday at the P. and S. Hospital were held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock from the chapel of the Corley Funeral Home. Capt. Herschel Murphy of the Salvation Army, conducted the rites and burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

Surviving are a son, W. L. Ayers, Corsicana; a nephew, J. E. Rush, Dallas; four grandchildren and other relatives.

Pallbearers were D. W. Blue, Roy Thompson, Alvin Grill, Carl Borg, Raymond Carroll and Roy Miller.

Notes:


J. Gillette Roe
Oct 10, 1911 - Dec 24, 1923

LITTLE BOY KILLED BY TRAIN

TWELVE YEAR OLD SON OF MR. AND MRS. ROE INSTANTLY KILLED

ACCIDENT OCCURRED IN NORTHERN OUTSKIRTS OF CITY JUST BEFORE NOON

Gillette Roe, 12 years old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Roe, 602 North Beaton street, was instantly killed at 11:45 o’clock Monday morning when he was struck by the Southern Pacific southbound passenger train NoN. 15, at the northern outskirts of the city. The body was knocked a distance of 30 feet, and then rolled down a 75 foot embankment to the valley below.

The local company surgeon was called but the boy died in a few minutes. An ambulance arrived and took the mangled body to the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors., where it is held pending funeral arrangements.

Gillette with his younger brother, J. C., and three boy companions and school mates had been rabbit hunting during the morning and were returning home at noon when the accident happened.

The five boys had stopped on the short trestle that overgrades the tracks of the Trinity &Brazos Valley and were observing a moving northbound freight as it passed under them.

They crouched down on the trestle and were observing the top of the train through the openings between the crossties, they said, when the southbound S. P). incoming train swooped down upon them. The noise of the freight train apparently accounts for not hearing the approach of the death train. The five boys ran, four of them managing to escape. The boys said Gillette apparently blinded from the ascending smoke of the freight train coming through the trestle, and darted towards the passenger train and then turned the opposite direction. The engine pilot ran under him, picked him clear of the grown and tossed the limp and lifeless body down the dump.

Engineer Mat Williams on seeing the boys as the train approached the trestle at high speed applied the brakes in an endeavor to stop, but the distance was too short to stop the train to avoid the accident. The train came to a full stop, however, and Conductor R. L. Fountain took charge of the body till the surgeon and ambulance arrived.

The train was an hour behind its schedule and pulled out of here two hours late.

The little boy is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Roe, and his brother, J. C. Roe, aged 10.

Notes:

---

Funeral Services For Little Boy Tuesday

Funeral services for Gillette Roe, 12, who met his death about noon Monday when he was struck by a Southern Pacific passenger train were held at the family home, 602 North Beaton Street, at 4 o’clock Tuesday afternoon. The Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the First Methodist church and Rev. C. G. Vincent, pastor of the Church of Christ, conducted the services. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery. Active pall-bearers were J. B. Redden, Gordon Sutton, R. P. McEntire, W. A. Hammett, John Curington and B. Curington.

Notes:


Edith Jester Graves
1922 - Mar 12, 1923

Death of Little Girl.

Edith Jester, the 15-months-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Graves died at the family home, 1616 West Second avenue, last night after an illness of only a few hours. The remains will be interred in Oakwood tomorrow morning at 10:30. Mr. and Mrs. Graves have the sympathy of a host of friends in the great sorrow that has come into their lives.

The following are the pallbearers:

Active—P. D. Williams, J. S. Eubank, Dr. H. B. Jester, B. B. Munsey, B. H. Frick and Sam J. Helm.

Honorary—Judge C. L. Jester, John Mitchell, E. Z. Slaughter, H. Gentry, Chas. G. Jester, W. B. Thomas, G. C. Dunn, E. L. Dupuy, W. C. Windsor of Dallas, C. A. Mullin of Dallas, Dr. E. H. Newton, W. F. Seale, Jno. C. Calhoun, Byron Cheney, Jean Montrey, W. H. Penland, E. E. Babers, O. E. Stone, C. C. Sands, Dr. J. A. Jones, Max Almond, Z. J. Pogue and Sam H. Butler.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Monday, March 12, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • d/o Royall Jesse Graves & Mary Hester (Medaris) Graves both buried in Graves Cemetery, Rockett, Ellis County, Texas

John W. Ayers
Jan 19, 1923 - Nov 29, 1923

Died Today.

John W. Ayres, ten month’s old son of W. L. Ayers of 512 East Tenth street, died Saturday morning at 9:30 o’clock and the remains were interred in Oakwood cemetery Sunday morning at 9:50 o’clock. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. Chasteen, pastor of the First Christian Church. The funeral services were held at home.

Notes:


Lora L. (Martin) Norton-White
1876 - Jan 8, 1923

Funeral Was Well Attended.

The remains of the late Mrs. Lola White were laid to rest in Oakwood this afternoon after funeral services at the home conducted by Rev. Ilion at the home conducted by Rev. Ilion T. Jones. A large number of friends attended and there were many beautiful floral offerings.

Notes:


Doris Pope
Jul 15, 1914 - Dec 5, 1923

Died Today.

Dorris Pope, daughter of J. T. Pope, died today, and the funeral will be held some time Thursday with burial in Oakwood cemetery.

The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday, December 5, 1923 - Submitted by Diane Richards

Funeral Today.

Dorris Pope, aged 8 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Pope, who died Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock, was buried in Oakwood cemetery this morning at 11 o’clock.

Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the First Methodist Church conducted the services.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, December 6, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • (Monument has wrong death month and year) died of measles d/o Thomas Jefferson Pope and Mallisa Mae (Campbell) Pope

George William Langridge
Oct 1860 - Jan 31, 1923

Remains Were Interred Today.

The remains of Geo. W. Langridge who died Saturday after a long illness, were interred in Oakwood this morning at 11 o’clock. The funeral took place from the Sutherland Undertaking parlor, and Rev, H. J. Ellis officiated. The deceased was a native of England, coming to the United States with his parents in childhood. He had lived in Corsicana for many years, and had numerous friends who regret his passing away. His wife, three children, five grandchildren, and other relatives.

Notes:


Elizabeth Jane (McKinney) Beaton
Jan 4, 1832 - Nov 14, 1923

MRS. E. J. BEATON DIED TODAY AFTER ILLNESS MANY WEEKS

Mrs. E. J. Beaton, who had been a resident of Corsicana for seventy-seven years, died this morning at the home of here daughter-in-law, Mrs. Ralph Beaton, at 10:30, and the funeral will take place tomorrow, but the hour has not yet been named. Her almost life-long friends, Rev. Horace Bishop, and her pastor, Rev. Alonzo Monk, are expected to conduct the funeral services.

The deceased was born in Illinois, and came from that state to Corsicana. In her father’s family there were twelve children, and Mrs. Mary Miller, her sister, is now the only one of the family left.

The deceased reared three children, but these all preceded her to the grave. She has thirteen grandchildren and a number of great-grandchildren. The deceased was a charter member of the First Methodist Church. She was a veritable mother of Israel, and up to only a short time ago, when the feebleness of age prevented, she was a constant attendant upon all the services of her church. There are but a few of her old time friends living, and they will all mourn her departure, and so will the generations that came after her, for all who knew her loved and honored her.

Notes:

---

Grandma Beaton Laid to Rest.

The last sad rites were performed over the remains of the late Mrs. E. J. Beaton, Friday morning at the First Methodist Church, after which she was gently laid to rest in Oakwood by the side of her husband, Alexander Beaton, under a canopy of lovely flowers.

Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., her friend and pastor, who was attending the General Conference in Temple, came home to hold her funeral, and a more beautiful tribute of love and praise could not have been paid than that he paid Grandma Beaton. His comparison of her pure, sweet life to a full blown magnolia of the sunny south was one of the many lovely thoughts in his address.

The love and esteem with which Mrs. Beaton was held in Corsicana and elsewhere was attested by the profusion of exquisite floral offerings which completely filled the pulpit of the church. The choir rendered several sweet and appropriate songs during the service at the church and the cemetery. The pall bearers, Messrs. Ralph Beaton, Walter Beaton, A. H. Kerr, W. G. Clarkson, E. H. Kimball and E. Y. Chambers were grandsons of Mrs. Beaton.

The passing of this good woman is not only a loss to her loved ones, but to the church that she loved and served so faithfully all her life, and to the entire community. The world will be a better place to live in for her having been there.

Those from out of town attending the funeral were: Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Beaton, Mr. E. H. Kimball, Mr. E. Y. Chambers, Mr. Leo Jester of Dallas, Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson, Mrs. Clay Johnson, and Mrs. Pearl Polk of Fort Worth.

Notes:


Roena (Duren) Hughes
Oct 8, 1879 - Dec 23, 1938

FUNERAL SERVICES SATURDAY MORNING MRS. ROENA HUGHES

HAD RESIDED IN CORSICANA PRACTICALLY ALL OF HER VERY ACTIVE LIFE.

Funeral services for Mrs. Roena Hughes, aged 59 years, wife of John C. Hughes, were held from the First Presbyterian church Saturday morning at 10 o’clock. Interment was in Oakwood cemetery. The rites were conducted by Rev. W. R. Hall, pastor of the church. Mrs. Hughes died in the Navarro clinic early Friday morning after several days illness with pneumonia.

Mrs. Hughes was born at Petty’s Chapel and had resided in Corsicana practically all of her life. She was active in all phases of the work of her church, the Rebekahs, W. B. A. and other organizations.

Surviving are her husband, a son, Jack Hughes, Corsicana; three daughters, Mrs. Boyd McMullan, Campti, La.; Mrs. Marvin Wallace, Corsicana and Mrs. Frank Rainey, Houston; a brother, George Duren, Chicago; several grandchildren and numerous other relatives.

Pallbearers were J. M. Pugh, J. H. Sullivan, C. B. Couch, Allen Edens, E. C. Sears, Dr. L. C. Polk, F. C. Paul, G. C. Lansford, Dallas; C. A. Deveney and S. D. Goins.

Honorary pallbearers were officers of the Grand Lodge of Texas, IOOF, and officers of the First Presbyterian church.

Sutherland-McCammon Funeral Home directed the arrangements.

Notes:


Edward J. DeRoch
Jul 3, 1868 - May 16, 1923

Remains Were Interred Here.

The remains of C. J. Deroch, of El Campo, who died at the P. and S. hospital here yesterday after a brief illness, were interred in Oakwood this afternoon, with services at the grave by Rev. R. G. Lowe. A son of the deceased, was here from El Campo to look after the funeral.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, May 17, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • Born in Canada h/o Margaret H. (Wescott) DeRoch buried in South Park, Houston, Tx. s/o Elic DeRoch and Maggie (Westgate) DeRoch
    (son is Clyde E. DeRoch) ( Edward worked in the oil field here)

Nettie Mae (Rainwater) Neal
Aug 1888 - Mar 26, 1923

Died in Teague Monday.

Mrs. Nettie May Neal, wife of George Neal, aged 42 years, died in Teague Monday, and the remains were interred in Oakwood yesterday afternoon, the funeral taking place from the T. and D. V. depot. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. G. Vincent of the Church of Christ here, and Rev. J. P. Nall of Teague. The husband and two children survive. The family formerly lived here and the death of Mrs. Neal is regretted by many friends here.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun Wednesday, March 28, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • w/o George Ivy Neal married Dec. 9, 1902 d/o Martin Van Buren Rainwater and Fannie Wright (Mayberry) Rainwater

Arthur F. Adamite/Adamike
abt 1888 - Jun. 6, 1923

Died in Teague Yesterday.

Arthur Adamite, aged 35 years, a former resident of here, died in Teague yesterday and the remains will be brought here over the Trinity & Brazos Valley railroad this afternoon and the funeral will take place from there at 5:10 with interment in Oakwood. The deceased was a former resident here and leaves a wife and one child. He was a brother-in-law of George Neal of Corsicana.

Notes

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, June 7, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • Marriage record says Adamike obit says Adamite. Unable to locate a death certificate
  • h/o Mattie Clyde (Rainwater) Adamike-Mitchell married Apr. 2, 1911 (she married Carl Thomas Mitchell)

Earnest Lee Miller
Oct 9, 1921 - Nov 12, 1923

Death of Little Boy.

Ernest Lee Miller, aged two years, son of C. W. Miller, who lives at the new town of Whitten, between Mildred and Navarro, died in the county hospital last night, and the funeral took place at 2 p.m. today from the Southland undertaking parlors, with interment in Oakwood. The family recently moved here from Arkansas.

Notes:


David Crockett Newcomb
May 25, 1844 - Oct. 4, 1923

Remains Interred in Oakwood.

Remains of the late D. C. Newcomb, 79 years of age, and a Confederate Veteran who had lived here for many years, were laid to rest in Oakwood this afternoon after funeral services from the home conducted by Rev. Alkins of the Nazarine Church. Many Confederate Veterans and other friends attended the funeral. The deceased was a good citizen and had many friends among those who had known him all the years of his residence here.

Notes:

--

Confederate Veteran Died This Afternoon

D. C. Newcomb, aged 79 years, a Confederate Veteran, died at his home in East Corsicana this afternoon at 3 o’clock with burial in Oakwood cemetery. He is survived by his wife and several children.

Capt. E. L. Bell, commander of Camp Winkler, United Confederate Veterans, requests that all members of Camp Winkler attend the funeral in a body, meeting at the residence.

Notes:


Rosaetta E. Leggitt
Nov 26, 1922 - Sep 28, 1923

Died Near Mildred.

Rosetta E. Leggitt, ten months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Leggitt, died at 2:30 o’clock Friday morning at the home of her parents near Mildred.

The remains will be interred in Oakwood cemetery Saturday afternoon at 4 o’clock.

Mr. Leggitt has been in the employ of the Humphreys Oil Company as a teaming contractor during the past two years, having been stationed in Mexia, the Corsicana field and in the Arkansas field.

Notes:

---

Remains Interred in Oakwood.

Funeral services for Rosetta Leggett, 10-months-old daughter of A. B. Leggett of the Mildred oil field took place in Oakwood this afternoon at 4 o’clock, Rev. C. A. Chasteen officiating.

Notes:


George Ivy Neal
Oct 5, 1874 - Nov 29, 1923

Funeral Sunday.

George I. Neal, aged forty-nine years, died in Dallas Thursday and the remains were interred in Oakwood cemetery here Sunday afternoon. The deceased is survived by four children.

The deceased was formerly a resident of Corsicana.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Monday, December 3, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • 1st wife Tessie (Davis) Neal 2nd wife Bessie (Carter) Neal 3rd wife Nettie Mae (Rainwater) Neal married Dec. 9, 1902; s/o William Hanson Neal and Elizabeth Jane “Bettie” (Blair) Neal

Reuben Jackson Tyner
Feb 6, 1852 - Jun 5, 1925

R. J. Tyner Died at Roane Last Night

R. J. Tyner, aged 73 years, died at Roane Friday night at 10:30 o’clock and the funeral services were held at the First Baptist church at Roane this afternoon. The remains were interred in Oakwood cemetery this afternoon.

Several children survive.

Note:


INFANT SON Ryan
B&D Nov. 29, 1923

Died Last Night.

The baby boy born to Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Ryan yesterday died last night and the remains were interred in Oakwood this afternoon.

Notes:


Alice M. (Laverty) Allen
Oct 26, 1846 - May 7, 1923

Died in Austin.

Mrs. Alice Allen, aged 77, died in Austin Monday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Claude hunt, and the remains reached here today at 6 a.m., and will be interred in Oakwood cemetery. The deceased was a sister of Mrs. Emma Vance and Mrs. W. H. White of Corsicana, and an aunt of Mrs. Sam Inman, Mrs. Pierce Colquitt and Messrs. Ed White and Geo. Whytte. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 from the home of S. H. Inman, 810 South Eighteenth street.

Notes:


Walter H. McGlon
Oct. 7, 1920 - Apr. 7, 1923

Little Boy Died Saturday.

Walker H. McGlon, 3 –year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. McGlon, died at the family home, 609 East Second avenue Saturday afternoon, and the remains were interred in Oakwood yesterday morning at 11 o’clock.

Notes:


Benjamin Franklin “Ben” Fleming
Oct 24, 1879 - Oct 16, 1950

Galveston Man Rites Wednesday

Funeral rites for Ben F. Fleming, 70, who died at his home in Galveston Monday night, will be held from the Corley Funeral Chapel Wednesday at 4 p.m.

The services will be conducted by Rev. Jack Goff, pastor of the North Side Baptist church with burial in Oakwood cemetery.

Surviving are a brother, Louis H. Fleming, Galveston; seven nephews, Anderson and Milton Fleming, both of Galveston; Cecil, Sam and Ben Bondurant, all of Corsicana; Burnett Bondurant, Sundown, and Jeff Bondurant, Los Angeles; and a niece, Mrs. Ann Wright, Hitchcock, and other relatives.

Pallbearers are to be Wade Jones, Rev. W.H. Brinkley, M. H. Johnson, S. L. McCrary, J. W. Ford and Jeff Webb.

Notes:


Louis Harrison Fleming
Sep 10, 1886 - Feb 24, 1970

Louis Fleming Services Friday

Graveside rites will be held Friday at 2 p.m. in Oakwood cemetery for Louis H. Fleming, 83, a native of Duncan, S. C., who died Tuesday in Galveston, where he had spent most of his life.

He is survived by six nephews and one niece. Corley will handle local arrangements.

Notes:

--

Fleming Rites

Graveside rites for Louis H. Fleming, 83, were held Friday at 2 p.m. in Oakwood Cemetery. Mr. Fleming died Tuesday in Galveston where he had spent most of his life.

He is survived by six nephews and one niece. Corley Funeral Home was in charge of local arrangements.

Notes:


Mary (Garner ?) Ramsey-Taylor
Feb 1845 - Oct 25, 1923

Remains Interred Today.

The funeral for the remains of the late Mrs. Mary Taylor took place this afternoon at 3:30 from the home of her daughter, Mrs. Will Molloy, with Revs. Alonzo Monk and W. T. Ingram officiating. There was a large attendance and many beautiful floral offerings.

Besides her daughter the deceased had a sister, Mrs. Farrar, in Tennessee. A granddaughter, Mrs. E. L. Hart of Malakoff was here to attend the funeral as were two nephews, E. Farrar of Royce City, and G. Farrar of Corsicana.

Notes:


Agnes (Riddell) Robinson
Oct 3, 1853 - Apr 29, 1923

Aged Resident of This County Dead

Mrs. Agnes Robinson, aged 70 years, a native of England, but for many years a resident here and in the Tupelo community, died at her home near Tupelo Saturday night, and the remains were interred in Oakwood this afternoon at 4 o’clock, the last sad rites taking place in St. John’s Episcopal church of which the deceased was a communicant, and conducted by Rev. H. J. Ellis, the rector.

The deceased and her husband came to Corsicana more than fifty years ago, and her husband was for a number of years timekeeper here in the shops of the Houston & Texas Central railroad, and after the death of her husband many years ago, the deceased settled on a large farm near Tupelo where she resided till her death. The deceased is survived by one son, Will Robinson and eleven grandchildren.

The funeral services today were largely attended and there were many beautiful floral offerings.

The following acted as pallbearers: George Walton, E. T. Wareing, Ike Levy, Henry Levy, T. J. Walton and E. A. Johnson.

The deceased was a woman of refinement and rare intelligence, and was highly esteemed by all who knew her.

Notes:


Nancy S. “Nellie” (Stailey) Moses
Dec 18, 1831 - Jan 3, 1923

Funeral Was Well Attended.

Funeral services for the remains of the late Mrs. Nellie S. Moses took place from the home of Mrs. W. L. Millet, 648 West Sixth avenue, at 10:30 this morning, and many friends were present, and there were many pretty floral offerings. Rev. Ilion T. Jones officiated, and paid a deserved tribute to the Christian character of the deceased.

Notes:


Finch Leroy Garner
Mar 8, 1899 - Dec 15, 1923

Remains Ex-Service Man Laid to Rest

The remains of Leroy Garner, aged 24 years, were interred in Oakwood Cemetery this morning at 10 o’clock, the funeral services being conducted at the home of his aunt, Mrs. P. M. Lea, 951 West Seventh avenue with Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the First Methodist church conducting the services.

The deceased died in the American Legion Hospital near San Antonio Saturday and the remains reached Corsicana on the early morning train today.

The following survive the deceased: Joe Key Garner of Corsicana and Collier Garner of Wichita Falls, brothers. An aunt, Mrs. P. M. Lea of Corsicana and an uncle, John P. Garner of Corsicana also survive.

The following were pallbearers: Joe P. Garner, Frank Garner, Preston Garner, Joe Coggins, Hamilton Garner and Mr. Owens.

Notes:


J. D. Hallmark
1919 - Dec. 16, 1923

Funeral This Afternoon.

J. D. Hallmark, five-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Albert Hallmark, 412 South Eighteenth street, died Sunday morning at 1 o’clock and the remains were interred in Oakwood cemetery this afternoon at 2 o’clock.

The funeral was conducted by Rev. L. C. Howell, pastor of the Eleventh Avenue Baptist church. The services was held at the cemetery.

Notes:


Barbara (Morris) Bailey
May 2, 1890 - May 31, 1923

Died Here Last Night.

Mrs. Barbara Bailey, aged 33 years, died at 2:30 this morning at the home of Mrs. Barbara Anderson, 403 East Eleventh Avenue, after a long illness. The deceased was a widow, and had no relatives here. The remains were interred in Oakwood this afternoon at 4 o’clock, with services at the grave conducted by Capt. J. W. Batson of the Salvation Army.

Notes:


Ida Frances (McClanary) Chaffee-Martin
May 8, 1871 - Mar 2, 1956

Mrs. R. N. Martin Dies Friday Noon

Mrs. R. N. Martin, 84, native of Kentucky, died suddenly about noon Friday at her residence, 714 North Commerce street.

Funeral arrangements were incomplete early Friday afternoon. Surviving are a son, W. A. Chaffee, Corsicana; four daughters, Miss Minnie Chaffee and Mrs. Della O’Mara, both of Corsicana; Mrs. Maud Vallandengham, Ludlow, Ky., and Mrs. Lillie Helzer, Covington, Ky.; seven grandchildren and several great-grandchildren.

Corley will direct.

Notes:

---

Sunday Services For Mrs. Martin

Funeral services for Mrs. R. M. Martin, 84, who died at her home, 714 North Commerce street, Friday, were held from the Corley Chapel Sunday at 2 p.m.

The rites were conducted by Rev. Riley E. Dale, pastor of the Missionary Baptist Church. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

Surviving are three sons, W. A. Chaffee, Corsicana; L. J. Martin, Dallas, and J. T. Martin, Grand Prairie; six daughters, Miss Minnie Chaffee and Mrs. Delia O’Mara, both of Corsicana; Mrs. Maud Ballandingham, Ludlow, Ky.; Mrs. Lillie Geizer, Covington, Ky.; Mrs. W. L. McBroom, Corsicana, and Mrs. Pearl Scoggins, Idalou, Texas; seven grandchildren and other relatives.

Pallbearers were Charles Edwards, Norman Smith, T. B. Barnett, C. E. Brittain, Artis Douglas and Henry Douglas.

Notes:


Roy James Leeds
Nov 17, 1903 - Oct 12, 1963

Services Here For Roy Leeds

Graveside rites for Roy Leeds, who died at Grapeland Saturday, were held at Oakwood cemetery here at 3:30 p.m. Monday.

Reared in the State Home here, Leeds was a well-known tenor here for years before his moving to Grapeland.

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Lucille Kent Leeds, Grapeland; a son, James Kent Parker, Washington, D. C.; a daughter, Mrs. Joyce P. Hagle, San Antonio; four grandchildren, two sisters, and other relatives.

Corley directed local arrangements.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Monday, Oct 14, 1963
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • h/o Lucille (Kent) Leeds s/o Frank Leeds and Lizzie (Pope) Leeds (Ruth, Ruby, Ethel, Charlie and Roy Leeds all were reared at State Home)

Andrew Barry Fleming
Apr 14, 1849 - Mar 12, 1923

Remains Interred This Morning.

Funeral services for the late Andrew B. Fleming, 74, who died in Galveston Monday night, took place in Oakwood cemetery this morning at 10 o’clock, Rev. C. A. Chasteen officiating. The deceased lived in Corsicana for some months at one time, and made numerous friends here who regret his passing.

Notes:


Dora (Hartzell) Fleming
Oct 3, 1861 - Feb 17, 1939

MRS. FRED FLEMING DIED IN MUSKOGEE; TO BE BURIED HERE

MUSKOGEE, Okla., Feb. 17.—(AP)—Mrs. Fred Fleming, 73, prominent in women’s activities in Oklahoma and Texas, died today at her home here after a long illness.

Mrs. Fleming was president of the Texas Federation of Women’s Clubs in 1916-1917.

She came here in 1919 from Corsicana, Texas, and for many years had been active in club work in Eastern Oklahoma. She was vice-president of the State Federation of Garden Clubs and past president of the sixth district of the Oklahoma Federation of Women’s Clubs.

Funeral services will be held here Sunday, with burial Monday at Corsicana.

Mrs. Fleming was a native of Dresden, the daughter of Dan and Martha Hartzell, pioneer settlers of Navarro county.

Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. James Elliott, Dallas; Mrs. John B. Sherman, Nebraska, and Mrs. Frances Reese, Okmulgee, Okla.; two sisters, Mrs. Mary H. Sullenberger, Corsicana, and Mrs. Chas. M. Lutterloh, Jonesboro, Ark.; a brother, J. W. Hartzell, Conway, Ark., and a number of other relatives. She was a sister of the late Ben Hartzell of Corsicana.

Sutherland-McCammon Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements here.

Notes:

---

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MRS. FLEMING HELD ON SUNDAY

Funeral services for Mrs. Fred Fleming, aged 73 years, native of Navarro county, who died in Muskogee, Oklahoma, Friday, were held here Sunday morning at 10 o’clock in Oakwood cemetery where interment was made. The rites here were conducted by Rev. P. E. Riley, pastor of the First Methodist church.

Mrs. Fleming had long been prominent in civic and other organizations in Texas and Oklahoma. She served as president of the Texas Federation of Women’s Clubs in 1916-1917, and was past president of the sixth district Oklahoma Federation of Women’s Clubs and vice-president of the Oklahoma Garden Clubs. She was prominent in club circles for several years before moving to Muskogee, Okla.

Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. James T. Elliott, Dallas; Mrs. John B. Sherman, Nebraska, and Mrs. Frances Reese, Muskogee, Okla.; two sisters, Mrs. Mary H. Sullenberger, Corsicana, and Mrs. Chas. M. Lutterloh, Jonesboro, Ark.; a brother, J. W. Hartzell, Conway, Ark., and other relatives.

Pallbearers were Beauford H. Jester, J. N. Garitty, George Baum, Ralph Tatum, C. L. Jester and Lowry Martin.

Sutherland-McCammon Funral Home directed the arrangements here.

Notes:

-----


FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MRS. FLEMING SUNDAY MORNING

FORMER RESIDENT CORSICANA BURIED IN OAKWOOD CEMETERY

Brief funeral services for Mrs. Fred Fleming, aged 73 years, will be held at Oakwood cemetery Sunday morning at 10 o’clock, Mrs. Fleming died in Muskogee, Oklahoma, at an earl hour Friday morning after an extended illness. The rites will be conducted here by Rev. P. E. Riley, pastor of the First Methodist church. Funeral services were held in Muskogee, Okla., Saturday morning.

Mrs. Fleming was a native of Dresden, and resided in Corsicana for many years. The family lived in Dallas for some time and for the past several years she had made her home in Muskogee, Okla.

Mrs. Fleming was prominent in civic and social circles in Corsicana, Dallas, and Muskogee. She was president of the Texas Federation of Women’s Club in 1916-1917 and was prominent in many clubs. She was vice-president of the State Federation of Garden Clubs in Oklahoma and past president of the sixth district of the Oklahoma Federation of Women’s Clubs.

Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. James T. Elliott, Dallas; Mrs. John B. Sherman, Nebraska, and Mrs. Frances Reese, Muskogee, Okla.; two sisters, Mrs. Mary H. Sullenberger, Corsicana, and Mrs. Chas. M. Lutterloh, Jonesboro, Ark.; a brother, J. W. Hartzell, Conway, Ark., and a number of other relatives.

Pallbearers will be Beauford H. Jester, J. N. Garitty, George Baum, Ralph Tatum, C. L. Jester and Lowry Martin.

Sutherland-McCammon Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Notes:


Fred Fleming
Apr 2, 1860 - Jan 21, 1931

FORMER CORSICANA RESIDENT DIED IN OKLAHOMA TODAY

BODY OF FRED FLEMING TO BE BROUGHT HERE FOR BURIAL FRIDAY

MUSKOGEE, Okla., Jan. 21.—(AP)—Fred Fleming, 70, pioneer East Texas Cotton and oil man, died at his home here today of paralysis.

He engaged in the cotton business at Corsicana, in 1882 and later was interested in development of oil fields near Corsicana and Beaumont. In 1919 he came here, where he engaged in the oil business.

Funeral service will be conducted here tomorrow, with burial in Corsicana. Fleming was a native of Kentucky.



Will Be Buried Here

The body of Mr. Fleming will arrive Friday morning at 11:15 over the Southern Pacific railroad, and will be carried directly to the family plot in Oakwood cemetery, for brief services conducted by Dr. J. W. Bergin, pastor of the First Methodist church.

Active pallbearers will be Allyn Lang, Ralph Tatum, George Baum, E. Y. Cunningham, Wesley Edens and J. N. Garitty.

Honorary pallbearers will include J. H. Woods, S. M. Kerr, C. L. Jester, J. S. Callicutt, A. G. Elliott, Clifford Tatum, R. L. Hamilton, H. D. Johnson, W. P. McCammon, J. N. Edens, J. E. Butler, Lowry Martin, F. N. Drane, S. J. Thigpen, Aaron Ferguson and A. M. Milligan.

Mr. Fleming was for many years a prominent resident of Corsicana, having at one time been engaged in the banking business here under the firm name of Fleming & Templeton. After leaving Corsicana he went to Dallas where he was also engaged in the banking business for a time, later going to Oklahoma where he resided for some time. Several years ago he returned to Corsicana and engaged in the bond business but returned to Oklahoma some time ago.

Mrs. Fleming who survives him, was Miss Hartzell before her marriage, daughter of one of the leading pioneer families of the western part of Navarro county, a sister of the late Ben Hartzell of Corsicana and of Mrs. Mary H. Sullenburger of 1515 West Third avenue. Her m other passed away at her home at Dresden only a few months ago, being at that time one of the oldest and most highly esteemed residents of the county.

Notes:

--
BODY OF FORMER CORSICANA WILL ARRIVE FRIDAY

FRED FLEMING DIED AT HIS HOME IN MUSKOGEE, OK., WEDNESDAY

Funeral services for Fred Fleming, 70, former resident of Corsicana, who died at his home in Muskogee, at an early hour Wednesday morning, were held in Muskogee, Thursday and the body will arrive in Corsicana Friday morning at 11:15 on the Southern Pacific train and will be carried to the family plot in Oakwood cemetery where brief services will be conducted by Rev. J. W. Bergin, pastor of the First Methodist church.

Mr. Fleming was well-known here and was a pioneer cotton, oil and bank operator. He came to Corsicana in the early days and was a cotton man here in 1882. He later was interested in the development of the Corsicana oil field and the Beaumont field. Mr. Fleming later moved to Dallas where he was interested in real estate business and moved to Muskogee about eleven years ago. He returned to Corsicana several years ago and conducted a bond office in the Navarro hotel, later returning to Muskogee.

Surviving are his wife and three daughters, Mrs. J. T. Elliott, Dallas; Mrs. Frances Reece, Muskogee and Mrs. John K. Sherman of Denver.

Active pallbearers will be Allyn Lang, Ralph Tatum, George Baum, E. Y. Cunningham, Wesley Edens and J. N. Garitty.

Honorary pallbearers will be J. H. Woods, S. M. Kerr, C. L. Jester, J. S. Callicutt, A. G. Elliott, Clifford Tatum, R. L. Hamilton, H. D. Johnson, W. P. McCammon, J. N. Edens, J. E. Butler, Lowry Martin, F. N. Drane, S. J. Thigpen, Aaron Ferguson and A. M. Milligan.

The funeral will be directed by the Sutherland Funeral Home.

Notes:

---

FRED FLEMING IS BURIED FRIDAY IN OAKWOOD CEMETERY

Funeral services for Fred Fleming, 70, former cotton, oil, bank and bond man of Corsicana, well-known business man here for many years, who died at his home in Muskogee, early Wednesday morning, were held at Muskogee Thursday, and the body arrived here Friday morning at 11:15 and was taken to Oakwood cemetery where a short funeral service was held in charge of Rev. J. W. Bergin, pastor of the First Methodist Church.

Mr. Fleming was a cotton man here as early as 1882, later being interested in the development of the Corsicana and Beaumont oil fields. He resided in Dallas a number of years.

Surviving are his wife, three daughters, Mrs. J. T. Elliott, Dallas; Mrs. Francis Reece, Muskogee and Mrs. John K. Sherman of Denver.

Active pallbearers were Allyn Lang, Ralph Tatum, George Baum, E. Y. Cunningham, Wesley Edens and J. N. Garitty.

Honorary pallbearers were J. H. Woods, S. M. Kerr, C. L. Jester, J. S. Callicutt, A. G. Elliott, Clifford Tatum, R. L. Hamilton, H. D. Johnson, W. P. McCammon, J. N. Edens, J. E. Butler, Lowry Martin, F. N. Drane, S. J. Thigpen, Aaron Ferguson and A. M. Milligan.

The funeral was directed by the Sutherland Funeral Home.

Notes:


Mattie (Duncan) Fleming
Dec 1, 1857 - Jul 24, 1941

FUNERAL SERVICES GALVESTON WOMAN HERE SATURDAY

Funeral services for Mrs. Mattie Fleming, 83 years of age, were scheduled to be held Saturday afternoon at 4 o’clock from Corley’s Chapel with the Rev. C. F. Griffin, pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church, conducting the services.

Mrs. Fleming died in Galveston on July 24. Interment will be in Oakwood cemetery.

Survivors include three sons, Ben F. Fleming, L. H. Fleming, all of Galveston; two daughters, Mrs. Lily Bondurant and Miss Belle Fleming, both of Corsicana; one brother, Bob Duncan, South Carolina; two sisters, Mrs. Stella Robbins and Mrs. Entrekin Anderson, both of South Carolina; eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

Notes:


Elmer Bose Robinson, Sr.
May 6, 1874 - Mar 6, 1923

E. B. Robinson of Blooming Grove was brought to the P. and S. hospital today suffering from appendicitis.

Notes:

---

E. B. Robinson of Blooming Grove operated on yesterday for an acute attack of appendicitis is reported resting well today.

Notes:

---

Mr. Bose Robinson of Blooming Grove, who was operated upon Thursday, was not doing so well on Sunday. His many friends as well as the friends of his brother, Mr. S. E. Robinson and his daughter, Mrs. Beverly Caldwell hope for a speedy recovery.

Notes:

---
Prominent Navarro County Citizen Dies

E. B. Robinson, aged 47 years, and a well known merchant of Blooming Grove, and a member of one of Navarro county’s best known and most prominent families, died at the P. and S. hospital at 1 o’clock this morning, following an operation there a few days ago for appendicitis. The deceased is survived by his wife and five children, one of these being Mrs. Beverly Caldwell, of Corsicana. There are also four brothers, Wiley D., S. E., S. B., and J. H. Robinson of Corsicana, and J. B. Robinson of Sour Lake, and two sisters, Mrs. W. A. Babb of Corsicana, and Mrs. Ella Blair, Dresden. The deceased was a Methodist, Mason, Shriner and Knight of Pythias, and in all the walks of life a man of irreproachable life and excellent character, and was esteemed as such by all who knew him, and his death is a source of genuine sorrow to all who knew him.

The funeral will take place at 10:30 tomorrow morning from the home of W. A. Babb, on West Fourth avenue and interment will be in Oakwood cemetery.

Rev. J. A. Walker, pastor of the First Methodist church of Blooming Grove, assisted by Rev. Ilion T. Jones will officiate at the funeral services at the house after which the Masons will take charge and conclude the services at the grave.

The following are the pallbearers: Active—Charlton Tillman, D. B. Fultz, J. R. Griffin, R. S. High, Herbert Williford and R. L. Harris. Honorary—James Spivey, George Green, C. N. Dillingham, John Yarber, J. A. Smith, Jay Sewell, C. A. Woodard, H. F. Chestnutt, Will Reed, L. I. Griffin, Jim Atchinson, John Glenn and Phelan Ivey, all of Blooming Grove and John Beck of Frost.
---

Attention A. F. & A. M.
All Master Masons are requested to meet at the Masonic Temple at 9:45 a. m. March 7, for the purpose of attending the funeral of Bro. E. B. Robinson.

W. W. WATSON,
Master Corsicana Lodge No. 174.

Notes:

---

FUNERAL LARGELY ATTENDED.

Last Sad Rites in Memory of E. B. Robinson Took Place This Morning.

The funeral of the late E. B. Robinson from the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Babb, West Fourth avenue, took place this morning and was attended by an immense throng of sorrowing friends. The services at the home were conducted by Rev. R. A. Walker, pastor of the Methodist church in Blooming Grove, assisted by Rev. Ilion T. Jones of Corsicana, after which the Masons took charge and concluded the services at the grave. There were many beautiful floral offerings, expressing in their loveliness the upright and manly life of the deceased. In addition to the many Corsicana and other friends who were in attendance the following list of his Masonic brethren, their wives and other friends from Blooming Grove, the home of the deceased were there:

A. P. Langston, J. W. Campbell, S. C. Hustead, R. E. Wyche, Frank Renfro, G. E. Ramsey, Walter Pevehouse, J. B. Jones, R. S. High, Edgar Fox, J. G. Melton, D. P. Grady, Gus Patterson, G. C. Taylor, W. J. Spurlock, J. A. Smith, J. B. Banks, H. P. Ivey, George Green, J. H. Caldwell, Deck Fultz, O. C. Ingram, Dr. W. M. Ellis, Dr. A. W. Wilkinson, C. N. Dillingham, J. W. Harris, O. H. Green, H. R. McCoy, J. C. Glenn, H. E. Frederick, Justin McSpadden, Dick Gaines, Tom George, J. W. Phillips, J. M. Huff, A. J. Green, J. W. Spivey, Alford Mauldin, W. E. Clark, Harry Dillingham, Chas. Jones, C. L. Beard, Jack Phillips, V. D. Burns, J. H. Walton, Ed Melton, James Cole, J. F. Yarborough, T. B. Griffin, C. L. Tillman, J. R. Griffin, George Holditch, H. D. Wiliford, W. E. McClendon, James Gantt, W. E. Huffstettler, J. O. Langston, W. E. Lee, J. H. Jones, L. I. Griffin, Duren Walker, F. H. Simpson, Mrs. Lula Heaton, Mrs. Mollie Freeman, Mrs. R. A. Walker, Mrs. W. A. High, Mrs. C. L. Tillman, Mrs. R. B. Grady, Mrs. J. H. Whorton, J. E. Walker, K. H. Hartley, Harry Robinson, Will T. Reid, Mose Armstrong, D. E. Magee, Clarence Pevehouse, J. L. Sewell, L. W. Thrash, J. A. Wallace, Rev. W. Z. Corbin, R. L. Harris and wife.

Notes:


Eula Lillian (Harvin) Tilton
Feb 13, 1892 - Feb 19, 1923

Funeral Took Place Today.

Mrs. Eula Lillian Tilton, wife of J. J. Tilton, and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Harvin, died yesterday after a brief illness with pneumonia, aged 31 years. Besides her husband and parents, she left a son of eight years and numerous other relatives. The funeral took place this afternoon at 2 o’clock, with interment in Oakwood. Rev. W. T. Ingram officiated at the last sad rites, and her six brothers-in-law, Lawrence Tilton, Seth Story, E. V. Ivey, H. C. Archer, Roy Martin and L. A. Pugh, acted as pall bearers, and there was a large attendance and many pretty flowers.

Notes:


Jennie M. (Williams) Nelson
Mar 25, 1859 - Jul 29, 1923

Aged Lady Dead.

Mrs. Jennie Nelson, widow of the late Alexander W. Nelson, who was in the employ of the refinery here for many years, and who passed away a few months ago, died last night at the P. and S. hospital as the result of a broken hip sustained recently, coupled with extreme old age.

The deceased was sixty-four years of age and is survived by a step-daughter, Mrs. Clara Burlingham, of Dallas.

The funeral will take place from the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors tomorrow morning at 10 o’clock, with interment in Oakwood.

Notes:

---

Remains Interred This Morning.

The remains of the late Mrs. Jennie Nelson were interred in Oakwood cemetery this morning by the side of those of her late husband, A. W. Nelson, who died here a few months ago.

The funeral services were held in the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors conducted by Rev. R. Girard Lowe, and there were pretty floral offerings and numerous friends attended.

Notes:


Alexander Watt Nelson
Feb 14, 1858 - Jan 28, 1923

Aged Man Passes Away.

A. W. Nelson, aged 69 years, and for the past ten years an employe of the Magnolia Refinery, died at an early hour yesterday morning at the Navarro hotel, after only a few hours illness. The funeral too place this afternoon at 2:30 at the place of death. Rev. Ilion T. Jones conducted the services at the house, and the Masons had charge at the grave. The one daughter, Mrs. Clara Burlingham, of Dallas. He was a native of Dallas. He was a native of Scotland, but had lived in America for many years, coming here from Olean, New York, where he resided for many years. He was a faithful, intelligent and useful employe at the refinery, and was highly esteemed by all with whom he was associated.

Notes:


John B. Allen
1873 - Jan 13, 1923

Remains Interred Yesterday.

The remains of the late John B. Allen, who died in San Angelo Friday, were interred here yesterday, the funeral taking place from the Sutherland undertaking parlors at 2 o’clock in the afternoon. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. A. Chasteen and there were numerous pretty floral offerings. The pallbearers were E. J. Hall, E. R. Glover, C. M. Thornell, R. B. Mitchell, C. P. Stevens and James McCreary, and a large number of friends attended.

Notes:


Benjamin Lester Shaver
May 15, 1900 - Jan 8, 1923

Died Yesterday Afternoon.

Lester Shaver, aged 22, son of Mrs. G. C. Rogers, died suddenly at the home of his mother in the Thorp Addition, at 3:30 yesterday afternoon of heart trouble, and the remains were interred in Oakwood this afternoon, Rev. A. E. Carraway officiating. The deceased had lived at Brady, Texas, till recently, and had been here only a few weeks.

Notes:


Grover Cleveland Rogers
Mar. 16, 1885 - Aug. 31, 1947

GROVER C. ROGERS FUNERAL SERVICES TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Grover Cleveland Rogers, aged 63 years, died at the family home, 1015 South Twenty-Eighth street, Sunday night with a a heart attack.

Funeral services are to be held Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock from the West Side Church of Christ. Burial will be in Oakwood cemetery. The services will be conducted by Dan Clark, minister.

Native of Arkansas, Rogers had resided in Corsicana most of his life.

Surviving are his wife, two daughters, Mrs. Clyde Heifner and Mrs. N. C. Muns, Jr., all of Corsicana, three grandchildren, and three sisters, Mrs. Josie Hanson, Corsicana; Mrs. Florence Brown, Little Rock, Ark.; and Mrs. Angie Jones, Oklahoma City, and other relatives.

Corley Funeral Home will direct.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Monday, Sep 1, 1947
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • h/o Blanche May (Karnes) Shaver-Rogers married Apr. 7, 1908 s/o William A. Rogers and Martha Ann “Mattie” (Huff) Rogers

Blanche May (Karnes) Shaver-Rogers
May 1, 1879 - Jun. 9, 1957

Mrs. G. C. Rogers Services Tuesday

Funeral rites for Mrs. G. C. Rogers, 76, who died Sunday evening, were held from the West Side Church of Christ Tuesday at 3 p.m. with burial in Oakwood cemetery.

The services were conducted by Earl L. Craig, minister fo the church, and Cato Shearer, Cameron Church of Christ minister, formerly of Corsicana and Kerens.

Mrs. Rogers was born in Tennessee, but had resided in Corsicana most of her life.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Clyde Heifner, and Mrs. D. M. Lamb; two grandchildren, Nedom Muns, Jr. and Bunny Muns; two great-grandsons, David and Tim Heifner, all of Corsicana; three sisters, Mrs. Winnie Wilson, Clute; Mrs. Nellie Evans, Dallas, and Mrs. Beulah Belard, Rattle Creek, Mich., and other relatives.

Pallbearers were Jack King, Arlee King, Van Wilson, Carson Wilson, Earl Wilson, Jr.; Nedom Muns, Jr.

Corley directed.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Tuesday, June 11, 1957
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • 1st husband Jesse N. Shaver married Dec. 8, 1898 2nd husband Grover Cleveland Rogers married Apr. 7, 1908 d/o Jacob Lee Karnes and Martha Elizabeth (Foster) Karnes

Lillian Aleen (Rogers) Muns-Lamb
Mar 26, 1911 - Jul 16, 1972

Mrs. Lamb

Mrs. Lillian Muns Lamb, 61, died Sunday in Memorial Hospital. A native of Corsicana, she was a member of the West Side Church of Christ.

Funeral services are scheduled for 10 a.m. Tuesday, at the West Side Church of Christ with burial in Oakwood cemetery. Johnny Ramsey and Carl Garner will officiate.

She is survived by her husband, David M. Lamb of Corsicana; a son, Dr. Nedom C. Muns 111 of Natchitoches, La.; a daughter, Mrs. Gaylord (Bunny) Miller of Denver, Colo.; two granddaughters, Amanda Kay Muns and Mary Aleen Muns, both of Natchitoches, La.; one grandson, Todd Page Miller of Denver Colo.; and a sister, Mrs. Clyde Heifner of Corsicana.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Monday, July 17, 1972
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • 1st husband Nedom Conway Muns, Jr. Married Sep. 29, 1930 2nd husband David M. Lamb d/o Grover Cleveland Rogers and Blanche May (Karnes) Shaver-Rogers

---

Mrs. Lamb

Funeral services for Mrs. Lillian Muns Lamb, 61, were at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the West Side Church of Christ of which she was a member. Ministers Johnny Ramsey and Carl Garner officiated. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

Pallbearers were Rollin Harris, C. L. Norris, David Heifenr, Tim Heifner, Cato Sheerer and Clifton McLin.

Surviving are her husband, a son, a daughter, three grandchildren and a sister.

Notes:


Nedom Conway Muns, Jr.
Sep 9, 1909 - Sep 16, 1947

NEEDHAM C. MUNS, JR. FUNERAL SERVICES THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Needham C. Muns, Jr., aged 38 years, 1431 West First avenue, died at Glen Rose Tuesday afternoon. He had gone to Glen Rose the previous day.

Funeral services will be held from the Westside Church of Christ Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Interment will be in Oakwood cemetery. The rites are to be conducted by Dan Clark, minister of the church.

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Lillian Muns; a son, Needham Muns, 111; a daughter, Janice Ann Muns; mother, Mrs. Mary Muns, all of Corsicana; four sisters, Mrs. R. L. Holcomb, Corsicana; Mrs. Willie Ficklin, Dallas; Mrs. W. C. Jones, Tyler, and Mrs. Norman Bryant, Corsicana, and other relatives.

Pallbearers include Lee Heifner, Richard Young, Cato Sheerer, Overton Crider, L. C. Cook, Ed Howell.

Griffin Funeral Home will direct.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday, September 17, 1947
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • h/o Lillian Aleen (Rogers) Muns-Lamb married Sep. 29, 1930; s/o Nedom Conway Muns, Sr. & Mary Jane (Robinson) Muns

---

THURSDAY RITES FOR NEEDHAM C. MUNS JR.; BURIAL IN OAKWOOD

Funeral services for Needham C. Muns, Jr., aged 38 years, 1431 West First avenue, who died at Glen Rose Tuesday afternoon, were held Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock from the Westside Church of Christ here.

The rites were conducted by Dan Clark, minister of the church, and interment was in Oakwood cemetery.

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Lillian Muns; a son, Needham Muns 111; a daughter, Janice Ann Muns; mother, Mrs. Mary Muns all of Corsicana; four sisters, Mrs. R. L. Holcomb, Corsicana; Mrs. Willie Ficklin, Dallas; Mrs. W. C. Jones, Tyler, and Mrs. Norman Bryant, Corsicana, and other relatives.

Pallbearers included Lee Leifner, Richard Young, Cato Sheerer, Overton Crider, L. C. Cook, Ed Howell.

Griffin Funeral Home directed the rites.

Notes:


Clara Pearl (Alexander) Hughes
Jan 8, 1885 - Oct 24, 1923

Former Resident of Corsicana Passes Away

According to information received in Corsicana today, Mrs. Pearl Hughes, aged 35 years, died in San Angelo at 6 p.m. Wednesday and the body will arrive in Corsicana over the H. and T. C. railroad Friday morning at 10:50 o’clock, the funeral to take place from the First Presbyterian church with burial in Oakwood cemetery. The Rev. R. Girard Lowe, pastor of the church will conduct the services. The time of the funeral has not as yet been announced.

Mrs. Hughes is survived by one son, Alexander, her mother, Mrs. Callie Alexander, a brother, Lee Alexander and a sister, Mrs. Luella Breuchner of Corsicana.

The deceased was born and reared in Corsicana where she has many friends who will be genuinely grieved to learn of her death. She was in the employ of the Sun Light Publishing Company for a number of years prior to her moving to San Angelo.

The news of the death of her sister has prostrated Mrs. Breuchner who is quite sick in her room at the Rundell Apartments.

Funeral Mrs. Hughes Held This Afternoon

The remains of Mrs. Pearl Hughes, aged 35 years, who died in San Angelo Wednesday evening, arrived in Corsicana this morning and the funeral took place this afternoon at 2 o’clock with services at the First Presbyterian church and burial in Oakwood cemetery. The Rev. R. Girard, pastor of the church conducted the services.

The body was accompanied to Corsicana by Alexander Hughes, son of the deceased; Mrs. Callie Alexander, her mother, and Miss Pauline Breuchner, a niece, Lee Alexander, a brother and his wife, arrived in Corsicana Thursday from Hillsboro. Mrs. Bruechner, sister of Mrs. Hughes, who lives in Corsicana is still very sick at her rooms in the Rundell apartments.

The funeral this afternoon was largely attended and there were many beautiful floral arrangements.

The following acted as pall bearers: F. A. Elliott, F. N. Rundell, E. L. McCarver, Roy Canady, C. H. Deabler and R. P. McEntire.

Notes:


Louella Constance (Alexander) Breuchner
Aug 13, 1881 - Jan 17, 1966

Mrs. Breuchner Rites Tuesday

Mrs. Louella Breuchner, 84, retired Daily Sun printer died in Crockett Monday morning following an extended illness.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday. The first service will be at the Crockett Presbyterian church at 10:30 a.m. and the second will be from the Griffin Chapel at 3:30 p.m. with burial in Oakwood cemetery.

The rites will be conducted by Rev. Andrew W. Byers, pastor of the Crockett Presbyterian church, and Rev. Eugene E. Wood, minister of the Westminister Presbyterian church.

Mrs. Breuchner was an employe of the mechanical department of the Sun-Light Publishing Company for many years prior to her retirement.

Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Leslie Wareing, Crockett; one granddaughter, Miss LeNoir Wareing, Crockett; a nephew, Al Hughes, Denver, Colo.; two nieces, Martha Heitt and Mrs. Bill Stinson both of Oklahoma City, and other relatives.

Notes:

---

Hold Services Mrs. Breuchner

Funeral services for Mrs. Louella Breuchner, 84, who died in Crockett Monday following an extended illness, were to be held from the Griffin Chapel at 3:30 p.m. with burial in Oakwood cemetery. An earlier service was held at the Crockett Presbyterian church.

The rites here were to be conducted by Rev. Andrew W. Byers, pastor of the Crockett Presbyterian church, and Rev. Eugene E. Wood, minister of the Westminister Presbyterian church.

Mrs. Breuchner was a printer for the Corsicana Daily Sun prior to her retirement.

Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Leslie Wareing, Crockett; a granddaughter, Miss LeNoir Wareing, Crockett; a nephew, Al Hughes, Denver, Colo.; two nieces, Martha Heitt and Mrs. Bill Stinson, both of Oklahoma City, and other relatives.

Pallbearers were to be Paul Moore, Dave Levy, W. G. Harlan, Owen Elliott, H. T. Robinson and Tom Moore.

Notes:


Lovie Jane “Jenny” (Davis) Fisher-Newcomb
Oct 24, 1863 - Oct 28, 1953

Mrs. D. C. Newcomb Rites Thursday

Funeral services for Mrs. D. C. Newcomb, 90, who died at the Twilight Home Wednesday, were held from the McCammon Chapel Thursday at 3 p.m.

The rites were conducted by Rev. E. N. Northcutt, pastor of the Church of the Nazarene, and Dr. W. M. Shamburger, pastor of the First Baptist Church. Burial was in Oakwood cemetery.

Native of Kentucky, born October 24, 1863, Mrs. Newcomb had been a resident of Corsicana more than 60 years. She was the widow of a Confederate Veteran.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. A. B. Harshaw, Dallas, and Mrs. J. M. Roberts, Corsicana; a son, Rev. Laban Newcomb, Alexandria, La.; nine grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren, and 10 great-great-grandchildren and other relatives.

Pallbearers were James B. Swindell, E. H. Smith, B. W. Matlock, J. M. McDaniel, Festus Newcomb and Johnny Hutchins.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, October 29, 1953
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • 1st husband John L. Fisher 2nd husband David Crockett Newcomb d/o Rudolphus S. Davis and Nancy Ellen (Trotten) Davis

Laban Hugo Newcomb, Rev.
Aug. 2, 1895 - Jan. 29, 1961

Rev. Newcomb Services Held

Graveside rites for Rev. L. H. Newcomb, 65, who died Sunday in Monroe, La., will be conducted from Oakwood cemetery Wednesday at 4 p.m. with Rev. Northcutt in charge.

Rev. Newcomb was formerly pastor of a Corsicana church a number of years ago.

Survivors, other than the widow of Monroe, La., include two sons, Don Newcomb, Albuquerque, N. M., and John Newcomb, New Orleans, La.; one daughter, Mrs. Ola Harper, Albuquerque, N. M.; one sister, Mrs. A. B. Harshaw, Dallas, and other relatives.

Corley directs.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday, February 1, 1961
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • US Army
  • h/o Margaret E. “Maggie” (Ammons/Lindley) Newcomb married Oct. 9, 1915 s/o David Crockett Newcomb and Lovie Jane “Jennie” (Davis) Fisher-Newcomb

Margaret E. (Ammons/Lindley) Newcomb
Aug 27, 1892 - Nov 26, 1969

Newcomb Rites Held Friday

Graveside rites were held Friday at Oakwood Cemetery for Mrs. L. H. Newcomb who died Wednesday in Oklahoma. She was the widow of the late Rev. L. H. Newcomb.

She is survived by two sons and one daughter.

Corley directed the services.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Friday, November 28, 1969
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • w/o Rev. Laban Hugo Newcomb married Oct. 9, 1915
  • (Marriage record says Maggie Lindley married Oct. 9, 1915—birth record of daughter says Maggie Ammons)

Stayton Powell Allen
Jun 25, 1894 - May 9, 1923

FUNERAL SERVICES HELD SUNDAY FOR VICTIMS OIL FIRE

BURIAL WAS IN OAKWOOD CEMETERY—SERVICES ATTENDED BY MANY

Funeral services for the last six victims of the Hughes-McKie oil well fire were held at the First Methodist Church Sunday afternoon. Burial was in Oakwood Cemetery in a specially provided lot. Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the Methodist church, and Rev. C. G. Vincent, pastor of the Church of Christ, conducted the services.

One of the largest crowds assembled on any similar occasion in Corsicana was in attendance to pay last tribute to those who tragically laid down their lives.

The church auditorium was filled to capacity long before the hour for the services. The hearse paused near the church and the pallbearers tenderly lifted the casket containing the remains of the six men, and bore it heavily laden with flowers to the church altar.

Members of the bereaved families with faces drawn in sadness and hearts breaking from grief seated near the church altar presented a pathetic moment. The altar literally inlaid with many beautiful floral offerings told in their sweetness of the numerous expressions of sympathy.

Music was rendered by the church choir. Rev. Vincent read from the New Testament. He spoke briefly of the uncertainty of life and the certainty of death. He offered prayers for the living paying a beautiful tribute to the dead.

Rev. Monk spoke a few words of condolence to the bereaved and lifted his voice in prayer.

Men, women and children throughout the congregation sobbed tears in the tenseness of the moment. Rev. Monk declared he hope to see Corsicana take charge of the mound where the men were buried, and set aside the day for an appropriate memorial service to be held in memory of the men who died in the disaster each year.

Another song was sung and another prayer was said, and the casket was borne to the cemetery, where the services were concluded.

Pallbearers were Hon. Luther Johnson, Mayor J. S. Eubank, J. L. Halbert, John C. Calhoun, W. H. Hastings, R. J. Jackson, Sam Jackson and R. J. Graves.

Notes:

---

HUGHES-MCKIE WELL STILL BURNING—FOURTEEN KNOWN DEAD

THOUSANDS VISITED LOCATION OF GURNING WELL—CROWDS THRONGED THROUGH MORGUE VIEWING BODIES

Like an active volcano in eruption, belching forth terrific flames of burning fire constantly fed by the constant flow of oil and gas, the Hughes-McKie well in holocaust which has cost at least 14 men their lives, continues to gush forth its awful blaze at 3 o’clock today.

For twenty-four solid hours flames ranging from 30 feet to 150 feet have leaped high in the air in its spectacular capers. Red streaks of flame ascend as from a mighty nozzle, and disappear in the form of huge black clouds of smoke, which drift with the wind in a surging blast.

The wind switched from the southward during the night and the mighty smokestack releases its flow in the direction of Powell, leaving darkened elements in its wake.

Thousands hurried frantically to the fields during last night to witness the spectacular fire-works.

The well being situated on the east bank of the creek is surrounded by tall timber. A rough one-way traffic road forming a winding snake trail for two miles is the only means of vehicle access to the scene. The roads were choked with vehicle traffic within a short time after the fire started. This kept up all night.

The well has been fenced off and traffic barred on the narrow road to give the men full right of way in getting boilers to the location.

Every company owning equipment in the Powell fields has tendered the use of all available boilers and other equipment to extinguish the flame.

Men are working like Trojans to get the equipment in place. It will be necessary to use fire foam and steam from a dozen boilers.

The burned bodies of at least six men remain in the fire zone according to DeWitt Watkins, who is working at the well today. He stated to a reporter of the Sun this morning that five bodies could be seen near the well, and there was another one missing. He also stated he believed that one or two spectators perished.

Jim Ball foreman in charge of the work believes the final death toll will reach 18.

Mr. Hughes accompanied by J. S. Banks, his attorney, are at the well this afternoon checking up on the number of dead and missing.

Hundreds of spectators thronged in and out and lingered about the Sutherland Undertaking establishment all day Thursday eager to catch a glimpse of the charred bodies of a number of the working crew which perished in the big blaze Wednesday afternoon when the Hughes-McKie No. 1 well ignited.

Five of the bodies, charred and disfigured by the flames almost beyond recognition, were brought to the morgue early last night. They have been identified as follows:

W.A. PHILLIPS, Kerens.
W. A. HICKS, Wortham.
JACK COOPER, Corsicana.
FRED CRAIG, Roane.
L. P. SHEEK, Dallas.

The bodies of Travis Owen and Emmett Bird, both of Kerens, were brought from the Physicians and Surgeons hospital later in the night, Owen died at 7 o’clock and Bird died at 11:05 o’clock. These two men were dragged from the fire zone and hurried to Corsicana. Each lived only a few hours.

C. B. Keever, J. E. Keever, J. R. Ferris and Jesse Blair from the Keever Undertaking company at Ennis arrived early last night to assist in preparing the bodies for burial.

The bodies of S. P. Allen, field foreman; E. C. Cooper, driller; James Phillips, L. C. Coop, M. O. Turner, have not been recovered. Max Meisner and Charlie Walker are believed to have perished. The charred remains of four can be seen near the well. They cannot be recovered on account of the intensity of the heat.

Funerals This Afternoon.
Funerals for four of the victims of yesterday’s terrible oil field holocaust took place this afternoon. The bodies of W. A. (Ban) Phillips and Travis Owen were taken to Rural Shade were both were raised; Emmett Byrd was interred in Eureka, his former home, and Fred Craig was laid to rest at Chatfield, which was his childhood home.

The ladies of Corsicana and the Chamber of Commerce covered each of the caskets with magnificent flowers.

The remains of L. C. Sheek were sent to Dallas this afternoon and the body of W. A. Hicks will be sent to Wortham tomorrow.

The roustabout crew of 20 men working in the vicinity of the well escaped. Several teamsters and tank men were passing in and about the premises and rushed to the aid of the burning men, but the blaze had swept the bottom before they could be reached.

A negro teamster succeeded in loosening his team from the material wagon and escaped with them. The wagon and its contents were consumed.

Tragic Spectacle.
The scene about the well presented a sad and tragic spectacle when the monstrous explosion came. Both the day and the night crew consisting of twelve men had just started work a short while before. Several bystanders near the well escaped with their lives by running. It is believed that more dead bodies are in the burned area in addition to the known dead.

Men ran in every direction in a frenzy and fell when overcome.

Jimmy Meeks, oil field scout for the Humble Oil & Refining Company; E. W. Quinlin, scout for the Simms Oil Company; Ellis Hammel, drilling contractor; and DeWitt Watkins, members of the roustabout crew, did heroic work in attempting to save the men from their awful death.

Heroic Rescue Work.
Bravely defying all danger at the risk of their own lives rushed headlong to the burning prostrate forms of the groaning men in death agonies in answer to their piteous cries for help and succeeded in bringing them out. The men breathed their last as they were being carried out of the gas, smoke and fire.

Jim Ball escaped with B. B. Simmonds, N. M. Dunman and Dick Pyle. As they made their exit from the timber, Ball turned back to assist Owen. He succeeded in getting him into the open but too late to save his life. Charlie Lewis of Corsicana ran to the assistance of Bird.

Piteous cries for water went up from the two dying men as the ambulance brought them to the hospital.

Meeks, Quinlan, Hammel and Watkins returned towards the well for the other perishing men, but were unable to reach them. Their bodies had been practically reduced to ashes in the blaze which had gained headway. Waste oil in the bottom covering almost an acre upon which large trees saturated with oil had become enveloped in the frenzied inferno.

Quinlan is a world war hero. A native of New York State, he served in the French Army during the early days of the war. Later he served with the Canadian forces.

Quinlan is the possessor of several war medals. He was awarded the Medalto Militaire; the Croix Guerre, and while in the British he service he was the first American to be awarded the Victoria Cross. He received several hard jolts in the war, in the rescue work Wednesday the fumes and smoke temporarily almost overcame him.

Phone Girls Busy.
Shortly after three o’clock a man called the Johnson Drug Store from the Commercial Hotel and communicated the first news that reached Corsicana of the terrible disaster. The caller at the same time told Miss Valsey Hubbard, the operator, that he wanted every doctor available to go to the scene of the McKie well. The call was immediately referred to the chief operator. She rang the Corsicana Surgical and Medical clinic and asked that the doctors be sent. The hospital and every drug store in town were called to assist in every possible way. The undertaking parlors soon dispatched ambulances toward the fire. Emergency telephone calls from Powell, Kerens and Corsicana came pouring into the central office running as high as 2,400 calls per hour.

Frantic calls from various individuals were made in effort to locate the families of the dead and injured men.

Public memorial services will be held at the gospel tent at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., will withhold his regular revival services until after the memorial ceremonies.

The Chamber of Commerce today sent floral offerings to the families of the deceased. A suitable medal will be provided for the family of each man by the commercial organization in commemoration of their brave efforts towards the development of the oil resources of the county.

Among the members of the roustabout crew escaping are L. W. Wilkitz, E. W. Arnett, Whyne Short, J. W. Crosby, Jas. A. McDaniels, J. A. Story, Jim Ball, Ned Dumas, and Johnnie Kennon. The names of the other men have not been learned.

These men had been gathered up from various leases in the Mexia district and brought to assist in taking care of the well. The working record and the names of the men were in Mr. Allen’s pocket, and none of the surviving members are able to give the names of all the men.

Superintendent Walker of the city schools of Henrietta, and wife, father and mother of Mrs. S. P. Allen, and father of Charlie Walker, arrived in Corsicana early today.

Station Agent Wyatt and daughters of Plano, friends of the Walker family are also here.

Mr. Allen’s mother, and Miss Walker of Denton are also here. Miss Walker is a teacher in the Denton College of Industrial Arts. She is a sister of Mrs. Allen.

Notes:

---

MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN OIL FIRE

Memorial services in honor of the oil field workers who lost their lived in the big blaze at the Hughes-McKie well Wednesday will be held at the gospel tent, Eleventh street and Seventh avenue at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening.

The ceremonies will be conducted under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Mayor J. S. Eubank and members of the city administration, presidents of the Rotary, Lions, Civic, Advertising clubs, the Retail Merchants’ Association will occupy a place on the rostrum.

Every minister in town will take part in the program.

The ministers will conduct a prayer service. Hugh L. Hiett will sing.

Hon. Luther A. Johnson will make the address of condolence. Other speakers will take part.

Notes:

---

FUNERAL SUNDAY FOR REMAINING OIL FIRE VICTIMS

MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN BIG OIL FIELD FIRE WILL BE BURIED HERE

Funeral services for S. P. Allen, Charles Walker, Jim Phillips, C. M. Cooper, E. C. Cooper and L. C. Cook, fire victims of the burning Hughes-McKie oil well, will be held at the First Methodist Church at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon, according to announcement made today by W. S. Banks, attorney for the J. K. Hughes Development Company.

Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the church assisted by Rev. C. G. Vineer, pastor of the Church of Christ, will conduct the services.

The remains of the six bodies will be interred in one casket in a specially provided lot in Oakwood cemetery.

Active pallbearers will be Hon. Luther A. Johnson, Mayor J. S. Eubank, R. J. Jackson, Sam J. Jackson, John C. Calhoun, R. J. Graves, J. L. Halbert and W. H. Hastings.

The smouldering remains of the six men were recovered from the fire area of the ill-fated Hughes-McKie well several days after it caught fire May 9. They have been held at the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors pending the possible recovery of another body believed to have been undiscovered in the debris.

Seven of the perish crew were recovered from the fire shortly after the blaze started. Each were positively identified, and have been buried.

Mr. Banks stated today that the six remaining bodies had been sufficiently identified as to justify giving out the name of each. He stated the official casualty list of the J. K. Hughes Development company places the number of known dead and accounted for at 13. The list is as follows:

S. P. Allen, L. C. Cook, M. O. Turner, Charles Walker, Travis Owens, W. M. (Ban) Phillips, Jim Phillips, L. P. Sheek, W. A. Hicks, C. M. (Jack) Cooper, E. C. Cooper, Emmett G. Byrd, and Fred E. Craig.

One report carried the name of Max Meisner as among the dead and missing. Mr. Banks stated today that communication had been established with Mr. Meisner, and the Hughes company is certain he escaped injury. The company had the fire area thoroughly scorched by men clad in asbestos clothing, and no other body was found. Mr. Banks stated the company feels certain that the bodies of all men who perished in the fire has been found.

The J. K. Hughes Development Company has planned to erect a suitable monument over the grave of the six men to be buried in Oakwood cemetery in remembrance of the total number of its employees losing their lives in the big fire.

A change of plans for extinguishing the fire at the burning well late yesterday appears to have been extended the time before the blaze is stopped. W. H. McClintock has assembled a rig of his own making and patent, which he is confident will put out the fire when brought into play, but so far the apparatus has not been applied. Work was suspended at the well at 5 o’clock Friday, and nothing was done during the night. A different apparatus containing a T-joint and valve gear model has been completed, and efforts are being directed towards apply it before the McClintock machine is used.

Rain last night rendered the creek bottoms and the roads leading to the field in a very muddy condition. Transportation out from town was slow early today, which operated to cause some delay in getting work under way Saturday morning.

Although the roads were very slippery, teams and heavy trucks were on the road with tons of materials for the various new locations for drillings.

A meeting of the stockholders of the Cor-Tex Deep Well Company was held at the well just south of town at 3 o’clock this afternoon. Plans for resuming operations at the test were thoroughly gone over. Several interested individuals attended the meeting and reports are that much enthusiasm is evidenced over the proposed new operations there.

The test south of Blooming Grove to be put down by Dr. Stubbs and Dunbar spudded in at 4 o’clock. Several went out from Corsicana to see the bit take its first plunge into the surface. A local photographer was present to take a view of the rig and the crowds assembled to see the new test stared.

Notes:


Louisa (Maynard) Krieg-Allison
Mar 18, 1872 - Jun 19, 1923

Funeral This Afternoon.

The remains of Mrs. Louise Allison, aged 51 years, who died in Fort Worth yesterday, reached here at 10:50 this morning over the Houston & Texas Central Railroad, and interment took place in Oakwood this afternoon at 4 o’clock, after funeral services in Sutherland’s undertaking parlors conducted by Rev. H. J. Ellis of St. John’s Episcopal church. The deceased was a former resident here and her first husband, J. S. Krieg is buried here. The deceased is survived by two children, LeRoy Krieg of Fort Worth, and Mrs. Myrtle Craig of California. A sister, Mrs. Florence Burnett, lives in Fort Worth, and a brother, G. R. Maynard lives in Arlington. All of these were here to attend the funeral.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday, June 20, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • 1st husband J. C. Krieg married Mar. 6, 1890 2nd husband M. Allison married Aug. 19, 1902 d/o Richard Maynard and Mary Ann (Sutter) Maynard

Nannie Lee (Berry) DuBose
Jan 28, 1899 - Dec 11, 1923

Funeral This Afternoon.

Mrs. Nannie Lee Debose died in Dallas Sunday at 11 o’clock, and the remains arrived in Corsicana late Tuesday afternoon.

The funeral took place from the home of W. J. Berry this afternoon at 3 o’clock with services conducted by Rev. L. C. Howell, pastor of the Eleventh Avenue Baptist Church.

Interment was made in Oakwood cemetery.

The deceased is survived by her husband, W. E. Debose, and two small children. Mr. and Mrs. Debose were residents of Corsicana several years ago. Mr. Debose is an employee of the Armstrong Packing Company.

Notes:


Elizabeth “Lizzie” (Roots) Estes
Jan 16, 1846 - Dec 30, 1923

Died at Roane Yesterday.

Mrs. Lizzie Estes, widow of the late J. F. Estes, aged 78 years, and for most of her life a resident of Navarro county, died at her home in Roane yesterday afternoon at 1:40 o’clock.

The funeral services were held in the Methodist church at Roane at 1 p.m. today, conducted by her nephew, Rev. M. E. Cuthbertson of Dallas, and Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., of Corsicana, and interment followed in Oakwood cemetery here. The last sad rites were largely attended and there were many beautiful floral offerings.

The deceased had long been a consecrated Christian and her long and useful life came to a close amidst the regrets of hundreds of friends who had known and loved her for many years.

Surviving the deceased are seven grown children: J. R., J. F. and E. P. Estes of Roane, W. T. Estes and Mrs. A. O. Kyser of San Bonita, Mrs. Chap Albritton of Powell and Mrs. J. J. Bryan of Roane. Two sisters and one brother also survive. These are Mrs. Lilla Sackwell of Greenville and Mrs. Rilla Bowles of Forney, and Tom Roots of San Antonio, all of whom were with the deceased in her last hours.

Notes:


Leona Leone “Leon” Brice
Jan 3, 1903 - Nov 2, 1923

Body of Drowned Girl Is Recovered.

By Associated Press.

Austin, Texas, Nov. 12.—The body of Miss Leon Brice of Corsicana, drowned 10 days ago in a creek in Austin, was discovered Sunday morning still within the city limits almost buried in the mud of the creek bottom. A continuous search has been made for the body including the use of dynamite to break up sand drifts in the creek bottom. The girl was drowned when an automobile in which she rode, fell from a bridge into the swollen creek. The body was sent to Corsicana.

-------


The body of Miss Leon Brice arrived in Corsicana today on an early morning train from Austin. The funeral service was held this afternoon from the First Baptist church at 4 o’clock with interment in Oakwood cemetery, Rev. Goodwin of Waco conducting the service.

The deceased is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Brice of Corsicana and two brothers and sisters, Carl and Ed Brice and Misses Zena May and Polga Brice, all of Mexia.

Notes:


Erasmus Berry Bunch
Feb 11, 1861 - Feb 21, 1923

Good Citizen Passed Away.

Erasmus B. Bunch, aged 62 years and for a long time a resident of this county, died at his home, 1018 South Seventeenth street, yesterday afternoon, near 4 o’clock, and the remains were interred in Oakwood at 2 o’clock this afternoon after funeral services conducted by Rev. A. E. Walker, of Ennis, a former pastor here of the Church of Christ. The pall bearers were H. B. Traw, Joe Baker, W. T. Ralston, James Pugh, Ernest McDowell and W. H. Brewster.

The deceased is survived by his wife and eight and eight children, Chas. L., B. C., Roy and Joe of Corsicana, Fred A., W. J. and Mrs. I. L. Baker of Drane, and Mrs. C. A. Wright of Pursley.

The deceased was a good citizen, an upright and honest man, and had many friends who sorrow because of his death.

Notes:

---

In Memoriam.

On Wednesday evening, February 21, 1923, the death angel came to the home of Mrs. E. B. Bunch and claimed her loving husband. He was a devoted husband, always kind and patient. All was done for him that a loving wife and children, relatives, kind friends and physicians could do, but all in vain. We cannot understand why he was taken from his home and loved ones; but we do know that he is now where there will be no more good byes said but where all will be sunshine and gladness. God saw fit to take him from us.

Weep not dear ones. I know it is lonesome without him but he is at rest. I knew that you would feel that it was more than you could hear to give your loved one up, but God had a place in heaven for him to fill so He took him to live with Him.

The one we loved has gone to rest
To reign with God forever blest.
Far from a world of sin and strife
He now enjoys a heavenly life.
And joins to praise and shout and sing
And make the heavenly arches ring.
Could we but hear his voice so sweetly sing the heavenly song;
Could we but see his smiling face
Delighted with the heavenly place—
We could not wish him back, but say
Dear one with God remain.

Written by one who loved him,
M. D. B.

Notes:


Mary Miller
Aug 27, 1901 - Jan 15, 1923

A LARGELY ATTENDED FUNERAL

Remains of Miss Mary Miller Were Interred this afternoon.

The remains of the late Miss Mary Miller, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. T. A. Miller, were interred in Oakwood this afternoon at 2 o’clock, after beautiful funeral services, befitting the life and character of the deceased, conducted by her former pastor, Rev. C. H. Cuthbertson. An immense throng of sorrowing friends were present, and there was a profusion of rarely beautiful floral offerings.

Notes:

---

TEACHERS I. O. O. F. HOME EXPRESS THEIR SYMPATHY TO FAMILY

The following is a copy of a letter sent to Dr. T. A. Miller and family by the teachers of the I. O. O. F. Home in Corsicana expressing their sincere sympathy in the loss of their daughter, Miss Mary Miller:

I. O. O. F. Home, Corsicana, Texas, January 16, 1923. Dr. T. A. Miller and Family, Corsicana, Texas. Dear. Dr. Miller and Family; It is with deep regret that we learned yesterday of the death of your daughter, and we wish by this means to convey to you our sincere sympathy. Because of your untiring kindness and care for all of us who make this our home, we think of you as true friends and grieve with you in your loss.

Sincerely,
TEACHERS OF I. O. O. F. HOME.

Notes:

---

Quite a number of out of town relatives and friends of Dr. and Mrs. T. A. Miller were here yesterday to attend the funeral of their daughter, Miss Mary Miller. Those here were: Mrs. Miller’s mother, Mrs. Murphy, Dr. and Mrs. Tate Miller, Dallas; Mr. and Mrs. Walter Love, Shreveport; Will Miller, Austin College, Sherman; Hugh Miller, Mart; Dr. and Mrs. Walcott, Dallas; Mr. and Mrs. Campbell Miller, Waxahachie; Mrs. Etta, Waxahachie and Miss Ruby Morgan from University of Oklahoma. This great concourse of sorrowing friends, and the large and beautiful floral offerings bespoke the popularity of Mary. The hearts of the entire community go out in deepest sympathy to the bereaved ones.

Notes:


Jessie H. Starkey
Feb 8, 1893 - Jan 16, 1923

Funeral Tuesday.

Funeral services for J. H. Starkey who died at the home of his brother at the corner of West Tenth avenue and South Twelfth street, were held Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 and were conducted by Rev. A. E. Carraway, pastor of the Eleventh Avenue Methodist church. He was buried in Oakwood cemetery.

Notes:


James Frank Starkey
Aug 17, 1863 - May 19, 1926

AGED MAN PASSED AWAY SUDDENLY IN CORSICANA TODAY

F. C. STARKEY SUFFERED STROKE OF APOPLEXY AT HOME OF SON

F. C. Starkey, aged 63 years, died suddenly with a stroke of apoplexy at the residence of his son, Henry Starkey, 614 South Sixteenth street Wednesday at noon. Funeral arrangements had not been made Wednesday afternoon pending the arrival of his brother, A. G. Starkey of Greenville, but will probably be held sometime Friday.

He is survived by his son and one brother.

Notes:

---

James Frank Starkey
Aug. 17, 1857 - May 19. 1926

FUNERAL SERVICES FRIDAY AFTERNOON FOR J. F. STARKEY

Funeral services for J. Frank Starkey, aged 63 years, who died suddenly with a stroke of apoplexy Wednesday noon at the home of his son, 614 South 16th street, will be held at the residence of his son, Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock. The services will be conducted by Rev. Paul J. Merrill, pastor of the First Christian church, interment will be made in Oakwood cemetery.

He is survived by his son and one brother, A. G. Starkey, of Greenville.

Following are the pallbearers:

E. B. Church, R. B. Child, R. T. Beaton, Sam Jordan, Sam McNeal, George Yates.

Notes:

----

FUNERAL SERVICES AGED RESIDENT WAS HELD HERE TODAY

Funeral services for J. Frank, Starkey, aged 63 years, who died suddenly Wednesday at noon with a stroke of apoplexy, were held Friday afternoon at the residence of his son, Henry Starkey, 614 South Sixteenth street. The services were conducted by Rev. Paul J. Merrill, pastor of the First Christian church. Interment was made in Oakwood cemetery.

He is survived by his son and one brother, A. G. Starkey, Greenville, Texas.

Following were the pallbearers: e. B. Church, R. B. Child, R. T. Beaton, Sam Jordan, Sam McNeal, George Yates.

Notes:


James Robert Blair
Jun 4, 1834 - Mar 18, 1923

Aged Citizen Passed Away Early Sunday

J. R. Blair would have been 89 years of age in June next, passed away yesterday morning at the home of his son-in-law, E. M. Polk, and the funeral took place from there at 10 o’clock this morning, with Rev. H. J. Ellis of St. John’s Episcopal church officiating and there was a large attendance and many beautiful floral offerings. The deceased had lived here for near twenty-five years. He was of a retiring and quiet nature, but an elegant and polished gentleman whom it was always a pleasure to meet, and with it a man of fine intelligence and exalted character. Surviving the deceased are his wife and five children, Mrs. Ed. M. Polk of Corsicana; Mrs. C. T. Matkin of Dallas; Mrs. W. A Robinson and Mrs. W. T. Farley of Shreveport, La.; and John Blair of Houston.

The following were pall bearers: H. D. Johnson, Al Sowell, Robert Watt, J. S. Murchison, Dr. L. C. Polk and W. H. Hastings.

Notes:

---

Mr. Robert Blair, father of Mrs. Ed M. Polk, passed away at an early hour Sunday morning and was buried at ten o’clock. Mrs. Blair and Mr. and Mrs. Polk have the heartfelt sympathy of their great concourse of friends in their sorrow.

Notes:

---

Broken Hearts.

“It is always raining somewhere. Tears are ever falling. Always some heart is breaking. And the rain beclouds other eyes. And the breaking hearts, make other hearts bleed, too.”

Many hearts in Corsicana go out in deepest sympathy to their bereft friends of the past two weeks—Mrs. J. R. Blair and Mrs. E. M. Polk in the loss of their husband and father; Mrs. J. C. Ma--ne, Jr. in that of her husband and Mrs. J. M. McNeese, her aged mother. We know that hearts are broken, and long to be able to allay the pain by words of comfort; for the only healing salve for hearts that are breaking comes out of the hearts that have been broken. Time alone, with the realization and recognition of His presence, so wonderous and quieting, so soothing and calming and warming, can heal your broken hearts, so take comfort in “The Lord is nigh unto them that are of a broken heart.”—Psalm xxxiv. 18. “He healeth the broken in heart, and bindeth up their wounds”—Psalm cxivii. 3. “My heart is overwhelmed: lead me to the rock that is higher than I.”—Psalm ixi. 2.

Notes:


Jean White
abt 1886 - Oct 25, 1923

WOMAN WHO LOST LIFE IN FIRE IS BURIED IN OAKWOOD

The remains of Miss Jean White, 39 years old, the unfortunate woman who lost her life in the Tuckertown hotel fire last Saturday morning, were interred in Oakwood this afternoon, Rev. R. Girard Lowe of the First Presbyterian Church officiating. Relatives in Olney, Ills., were heard from, but ordered burial here and oil field workers who knew her, contributed to give her a respectable funeral in Oakwood.

Notes:


James M. “Jim” Church
Mar 30, 1869 - Jun 15, 1922

DIED HERE LAST NIGHT.

James M. Church, Long Time Resident, to Be Buried Saturday.

James M. Church, aged 53 years, died at his home at the corner of Seventh avenue and Eighteenth street, last night shortly before midnight after having been confined to his bed only a few days, although he had been in ill health for the past several years.

Mr. Church was born at what is known as Old Raleigh, in the western part of Navarro county and had been a resident of this county all his life. He was a graduate of the Corsicana High School in its early days, he being the valedictorian of his class. He attended Trinity University, which was then located at Tehuacana and later read law and was admitted to the bar, he being a favorite among the members of the bar in this city. For twelve years he was deputy district clerk and was then elected district clerk, which office he held for four years with that office. For the past several years he has been in ill health, and has remained close about home, although he had been confined to his bed only since Tuesday, and his death came as a great shock to his family and friends. “Jim” Church, as he was known by his friends, was a quiet unassuming man, but read a great deal and kept up with the trend of events transpiring from day to day. He was liked by all who knew him and devotedly loved by his family, for he was a man who loved his family above all else, and as a husband and father left nothing to be desired. He is survived by his wife and one child, Christine, and by his aged father and two brothers, E. B. Church of Corsicana, and S. L. Church of Kansas City.

The funeral will take place from the family home, corner Seventh avenue and Eighteenth street, tomorrow, Saturday, morning at 10 o’clock, with interment in Oakwood cemetery. The Rev. Ilion T. Jones, pastor of the Third Avenue Presbyterian church, of which Mr. Church was a member will officiate.

The pallbearers will be Al Sowell, Sam Kerr, Wm. Elliott, James W. McGill, Henry Robbins and Cal E. Kerr.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Friday, June 16, 1922
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • Graduate of CHS (Valedictorian) h/o Kate (Collum) Church married Aug. 19, 1909 buried in Ridge Park Cemetery, Hillsboro, Tx. s/o William Loyd Church and Victoria (Barry) Church

James Wesley “Jim” Crosser
Dec 27, 1895 - Jan 4, 1922

JIM CROSSER SHOT AND INSTANTLY KILLED LAST NIGH-ARREST IS MADE

Locked behind bars within the narrow confines of a steel cage is confined Arch McCarter, well known in Corsicana and surrounding community charged by complaint made by Sheriff Walter Hays, before Z. R. Christian, J. P., with the murder of Jim Crosser, at 7:30 o’clock last evening in that part of the suburbs of this city known as “Stringtown,” northeast of the city limits.

From information secured from early arrivals after the killing who found Crosser lying on the gallery with his head toward the edge of the gallery it is said that Crosser was preparing to enter the house in which McCarter and others were located. Crosser was struck just above the heart with a full load of leaden pellets fired from a shotgun at short range, making a wound of less than two inches in diameter. Examination of the premises disclosed another bullet hole through the door at which it is said Crosser was attempting to enter.

The defendant has employed the firm of Callicutt & Johnson to represent him, and it is said by a member of this firm that the defense will be based upon the allegation that the deceased was attempting to enter the house for the purpose of robbery. Witnesses who visited the scene of the killing say that skeleton key was found in the keyhole of the door at which entrance was being attempted by Crosser. Search is being vigorously made by the authorities for an unknown person, who is said was in the company with Crosser at the time he was killed, and relying upon several clues thereto, it is believed that this unidentified person will be found within a short time. McCarter and Crosser, both young men, 30 and 31 years old respectively, are said to have been friendly prior to the killing.

Crosser was employed at the 66 Café since coming to the city three months ago from his home on the Barry road north of Orphans Home, but recently has been unemployed. He is the son of John Crosser, who resides at that address. Deceased was unarmed according to witnesses who arrived immediately after the homicide. Contents of the pockets of the dead man consisted of a plug of tobacco and a small pearl handle knife.

Preliminary hearing will be set for trial within the next few days, according to counsel for the defendant, who anticipates no doubt but that the defendant will be admitted to bail upon the showing offered by witnesses.

Notes:

---

Funeral services were held over the remains of Jim Crosser, who was killed on Thursday evening near the city limits by Arch McCarter, at 4:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon at the residence of a brother-in-law of deceased, 212 South 13th street. Interment was had at Oakwood cemetery under the direction of Bank Sutherland, undertaker. Deceased leaves a wife, father, and other relatives to whom great sympathy is extended by friends and acquaintances.

Notes:


Warren Martin “Ban” Phillips
Nov. 19, 1888 - May 9, 1923

HUGHES-MCKIE WELL STILL BURNING—FOURTEEN KNOWN DEAD

THOUSANDS VISITED LOCATION OF GURNING WELL—CROWDS THRONGED THROUGH MORGUE VIEWING BODIES

Like an active volcano in eruption, belching forth terrific flames of burning fire constantly fed by the constant flow of oil and gas, the Hughes-McKie well in holocaust which has cost at least 14 men their lives, continues to gush forth its awful blaze at 3 o’clock today.

For twenty-four solid hours flames ranging from 30 feet to 150 feet have leaped high in the air in its spectacular capers. Red streaks of flame ascend as from a mighty nozzle, and disappear in the form of huge black clouds of smoke, which drift with the wind in a surging blast.

The wind switched from the southward during the night and the mighty smokestack releases its flow in the direction of Powell, leaving darkened elements in its wake.

Thousands hurried frantically to the fields during last night to witness the spectacular fire-works.

The well being situated on the east bank of the creek is surrounded by tall timber. A rough one-way traffic road forming a winding snake trail for two miles is the only means of vehicle access to the scene. The roads were choked with vehicle traffic within a short time after the fire started. This kept up all night.

The well has been fenced off and traffic barred on the narrow road to give the men full right of way in getting boilers to the location.

Every company owning equipment in the Powell fields has tendered the use of all available boilers and other equipment to extinguish the flame.

Men are working like Trojans to get the equipment in place. It will be necessary to use fire foam and steam from a dozen boilers.

The burned bodies of at least six men remain in the fire zone according to DeWitt Watkins, who is working at the well today. He stated to a reporter of the Sun this morning that five bodies could be seen near the well, and there was another one missing. He also stated he believed that one or two spectators perished.

Jim Ball foreman in charge of the work believes the final death toll will reach 18.

Mr. Hughes accompanied by J. S. Banks, his attorney, are at the well this afternoon checking up on the number of dead and missing.

Hundreds of spectators thronged in and out and lingered about the Sutherland Undertaking establishment all day Thursday eager to catch a glimpse of the charred bodies of a number of the working crew which perished in the big blaze Wednesday afternoon when the Hughes-McKie No. 1 well ignited.

Five of the bodies, charred and disfigured by the flames almost beyond recognition, were brought to the morgue early last night. They have been identified as follows:

W.A. PHILLIPS, Kerens.
W. A. HICKS, Wortham.
JACK COOPER, Corsicana.
FRED CRAIG, Roane.
L. P. SHEEK, Dallas.

The bodies of Travis Owen and Emmett Bird, both of Kerens, were brought from the Physicians and Surgeons hospital later in the night, Owen died at 7 o’clock and Bird died at 11:05 o’clock. These two men were dragged from the fire zone and hurried to Corsicana. Each lived only a few hours.

C. B. Keever, J. E. Keever, J. R. Ferris and Jesse Blair from the Keever Undertaking company at Ennis arrived early last night to assist in preparing the bodies for burial.

The bodies of S. P. Allen, field foreman; E. C. Cooper, driller; James Phillips, L. C. Coop, M. O. Turner, have not been recovered. Max Meisner and Charlie Walker are believed to have perished. The charred remains of four can be seen near the well. They cannot be recovered on account of the intensity of the heat.

Funerals This Afternoon.
Funerals for four of the victims of yesterday’s terrible oil field holocaust took place this afternoon. The bodies of W. A. (Ban) Phillips and Travis Owen were taken to Rural Shade were both were raised; Emmett Byrd was interred in Eureka, his former home, and Fred Craig was laid to rest at Chatfield, which was his childhood home.

The ladies of Corsicana and the Chamber of Commerce covered each of the caskets with magnificent flowers.

The remains of L. C. Sheek were sent to Dallas this afternoon and the body of W. A. Hicks will be sent to Wortham tomorrow.

The roustabout crew of 20 men working in the vicinity of the well escaped. Several teamsters and tank men were passing in and about the premises and rushed to the aid of the burning men, but the blaze had swept the bottom before they could be reached.

A negro teamster succeeded in loosening his team from the material wagon and escaped with them. The wagon and its contents were consumed.

Tragic Spectacle.
The scene about the well presented a sad and tragic spectacle when the monstrous explosion came. Both the day and the night crew consisting of twelve men had just started work a short while before. Several bystanders near the well escaped with their lives by running. It is believed that more dead bodies are in the burned area in addition to the known dead.

Men ran in every direction in a frenzy and fell when overcome.

Jimmy Meeks, oil field scout for the Humble Oil & Refining Company; E. W. Quinlin, scout for the Simms Oil Company; Ellis Hammel, drilling contractor; and DeWitt Watkins, members of the roustabout crew, did heroic work in attempting to save the men from their awful death.

Heroic Rescue Work.
Bravely defying all danger at the risk of their own lives rushed headlong to the burning prostrate forms of the groaning men in death agonies in answer to their piteous cries for help and succeeded in bringing them out. The men breathed their last as they were being carried out of the gas, smoke and fire.

Jim Ball escaped with B. B. Simmonds, N. M. Dunman and Dick Pyle. As they made their exit from the timber, Ball turned back to assist Owen. He succeeded in getting him into the open but too late to save his life. Charlie Lewis of Corsicana ran to the assistance of Bird.

Piteous cries for water went up from the two dying men as the ambulance brought them to the hospital.

Meeks, Quinlan, Hammel and Watkins returned towards the well for the other perishing men, but were unable to reach them. Their bodies had been practically reduced to ashes in the blaze which had gained headway. Waste oil in the bottom covering almost an acre upon which large trees saturated with oil had become enveloped in the frenzied inferno.

Quinlan is a world war hero. A native of New York State, he served in the French Army during the early days of the war. Later he served with the Canadian forces.

Quinlan is the possessor of several war medals. He was awarded the Medalto Militaire; the Croix Guerre, and while in the British he service he was the first American to be awarded the Victoria Cross. He received several hard jolts in the war, in the rescue work Wednesday the fumes and smoke temporarily almost overcame him.

Phone Girls Busy.
Shortly after three o’clock a man called the Johnson Drug Store from the Commercial Hotel and communicated the first news that reached Corsicana of the terrible disaster. The caller at the same time told Miss Valsey Hubbard, the operator, that he wanted every doctor available to go to the scene of the McKie well. The call was immediately referred to the chief operator. She rang the Corsicana Surgical and Medical clinic and asked that the doctors be sent. The hospital and every drug store in town were called to assist in every possible way. The undertaking parlors soon dispatched ambulances toward the fire. Emergency telephone calls from Powell, Kerens and Corsicana came pouring into the central office running as high as 2,400 calls per hour.

Frantic calls from various individuals were made in effort to locate the families of the dead and injured men.

Public memorial services will be held at the gospel tent at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., will withhold his regular revival services until after the memorial ceremonies.

The Chamber of Commerce today sent floral offerings to the families of the deceased. A suitable medal will be provided for the family of each man by the commercial organization in commemoration of their brave efforts towards the development of the oil resources of the county.

Among the members of the roustabout crew escaping are L. W. Wilkitz, E. W. Arnett, Whyne Short, J. W. Crosby, Jas. A. McDaniels, J. A. Story, Jim Ball, Ned Dumas, and Johnnie Kennon. The names of the other men have not been learned.

These men had been gathered up from various leases in the Mexia district and brought to assist in taking care of the well. The working record and the names of the men were in Mr. Allen’s pocket, and none of the surviving members are able to give the names of all the men.

Superintendent Walker of the city schools of Henrietta, and wife, father and mother of Mrs. S. P. Allen, and father of Charlie Walker, arrived in Corsicana early today.

Station Agent Wyatt and daughters of Plano, friends of the Walker family are also here.

Mr. Allen’s mother, and Miss Walker of Denton are also here. Miss Walker is a teacher in the Denton College of Industrial Arts. She is a sister of Mrs. Allen.

The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, May 10, 1923 - submitted by Diane Richards

MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN OIL FIRE

Memorial services in honor of the oil field workers who lost their lived in the big blaze at the Hughes-McKie well Wednesday will be held at the gospel tent, Eleventh street and Seventh avenue at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening.

The ceremonies will be conducted under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Mayor J. S. Eubank and members of the city administration, presidents of the Rotary, Lions, Civic, Advertising clubs, the Retail Merchants’ Association will occupy a place on the rostrum.

Every minister in town will take part in the program.

The ministers will conduct a prayer service. Hugh L. Hiett will sing.

Hon. Luther A. Johnson will make the address of condolence. Other speakers will take part.

Notes:

---

FUNERAL SUNDAY FOR REMAINING OIL FIRE VICTIMS

MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN BIG OIL FIELD FIRE WILL BE BURIED HERE

Funeral services for S. P. Allen, Charles Walker, Jim Phillips, C. M. Cooper, E. C. Cooper and L. C. Cook, fire victims of the burning Hughes-McKie oil well, will be held at the First Methodist Church at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon, according to announcement made today by W. S. Banks, attorney for the J. K. Hughes Development Company.

Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the church assisted by Rev. C. G. Vineer, pastor of the Church of Christ, will conduct the services.

The remains of the six bodies will be interred in one casket in a specially provided lot in Oakwood cemetery.

Active pallbearers will be Hon. Luther A. Johnson, Mayor J. S. Eubank, R. J. Jackson, Sam J. Jackson, John C. Calhoun, R. J. Graves, J. L. Halbert and W. H. Hastings.

The smouldering remains of the six men were recovered from the fire area of the ill-fated Hughes-McKie well several days after it caught fire May 9. They have been held at the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors pending the possible recovery of another body believed to have been undiscovered in the debris.

Seven of the perish crew were recovered from the fire shortly after the blaze started. Each were positively identified, and have been buried.

Mr. Banks stated today that the six remaining bodies had been sufficiently identified as to justify giving out the name of each. He stated the official casualty list of the J. K. Hughes Development company places the number of known dead and accounted for at 13. The list is as follows:

S. P. Allen, L. C. Cook, M. O. Turner, Charles Walker, Travis Owens, W. M. (Ban) Phillips, Jim Phillips, L. P. Sheek, W. A. Hicks, C. M. (Jack) Cooper, E. C. Cooper, Emmett G. Byrd, and Fred E. Craig.

One report carried the name of Max Meisner as among the dead and missing. Mr. Banks stated today that communication had been established with Mr. Meisner, and the Hughes company is certain he escaped injury. The company had the fire area thoroughly scorched by men clad in asbestos clothing, and no other body was found. Mr. Banks stated the company feels certain that the bodies of all men who perished in the fire has been found.

The J. K. Hughes Development Company has planned to erect a suitable monument over the grave of the six men to be buried in Oakwood cemetery in remembrance of the total number of its employees losing their lives in the big fire.

A change of plans for extinguishing the fire at the burning well late yesterday appears to have been extended the time before the blaze is stopped. W. H. McClintock has assembled a rig of his own making and patent, which he is confident will put out the fire when brought into play, but so far the apparatus has not been applied. Work was suspended at the well at 5 o’clock Friday, and nothing was done during the night. A different apparatus containing a T-joint and valve gear model has been completed, and efforts are being directed towards apply it before the McClintock machine is used.

Rain last night rendered the creek bottoms and the roads leading to the field in a very muddy condition. Transportation out from town was slow early today, which operated to cause some delay in getting work under way Saturday morning.

Although the roads were very slippery, teams and heavy trucks were on the road with tons of materials for the various new locations for drillings.

A meeting of the stockholders of the Cor-Tex Deep Well Company was held at the well just south of town at 3 o’clock this afternoon. Plans for resuming operations at the test were thoroughly gone over. Several interested individuals attended the meeting and reports are that much enthusiasm is evidenced over the proposed new operations there.

The test south of Blooming Grove to be put down by Dr. Stubbs and Dunbar spudded in at 4 o’clock. Several went out from Corsicana to see the bit take its first plunge into the surface. A local photographer was present to take a view of the rig and the crowds assembled to see the new test stared.

Notes:

------

HUGHES-MCKIE WELL STILL BURNING—FOURTEEN KNOWN DEAD

THOUSANDS VISITED LOCATION OF GURNING WELL—CROWDS THRONGED THROUGH MORGUE VIEWING BODIES

Like an active volcano in eruption, belching forth terrific flames of burning fire constantly fed by the constant flow of oil and gas, the Hughes-McKie well in holocaust which has cost at least 14 men their lives, continues to gush forth its awful blaze at 3 o’clock today.

For twenty-four solid hours flames ranging from 30 feet to 150 feet have leaped high in the air in its spectacular capers. Red streaks of flame ascend as from a mighty nozzle, and disappear in the form of huge black clouds of smoke, which drift with the wind in a surging blast.

The wind switched from the southward during the night and the mighty smokestack releases its flow in the direction of Powell, leaving darkened elements in its wake.

Thousands hurried frantically to the fields during last night to witness the spectacular fire-works.

The well being situated on the east bank of the creek is surrounded by tall timber. A rough one-way traffic road forming a winding snake trail for two miles is the only means of vehicle access to the scene. The roads were choked with vehicle traffic within a short time after the fire started. This kept up all night.

The well has been fenced off and traffic barred on the narrow road to give the men full right of way in getting boilers to the location.

Every company owning equipment in the Powell fields has tendered the use of all available boilers and other equipment to extinguish the flame.

Men are working like Trojans to get the equipment in place. It will be necessary to use fire foam and steam from a dozen boilers.

The burned bodies of at least six men remain in the fire zone according to DeWitt Watkins, who is working at the well today. He stated to a reporter of the Sun this morning that five bodies could be seen near the well, and there was another one missing. He also stated he believed that one or two spectators perished.

Jim Ball foreman in charge of the work believes the final death toll will reach 18.

Mr. Hughes accompanied by J. S. Banks, his attorney, are at the well this afternoon checking up on the number of dead and missing.

Hundreds of spectators thronged in and out and lingered about the Sutherland Undertaking establishment all day Thursday eager to catch a glimpse of the charred bodies of a number of the working crew which perished in the big blaze Wednesday afternoon when the Hughes-McKie No. 1 well ignited.

Five of the bodies, charred and disfigured by the flames almost beyond recognition, were brought to the morgue early last night. They have been identified as follows:

W.A. PHILLIPS, Kerens.
W. A. HICKS, Wortham.
JACK COOPER, Corsicana.
FRED CRAIG, Roane.
L. P. SHEEK, Dallas.

The bodies of Travis Owen and Emmett Bird, both of Kerens, were brought from the Physicians and Surgeons hospital later in the night, Owen died at 7 o’clock and Bird died at 11:05 o’clock. These two men were dragged from the fire zone and hurried to Corsicana. Each lived only a few hours.

C. B. Keever, J. E. Keever, J. R. Ferris and Jesse Blair from the Keever Undertaking company at Ennis arrived early last night to assist in preparing the bodies for burial.

The bodies of S. P. Allen, field foreman; E. C. Cooper, driller; James Phillips, L. C. Coop, M. O. Turner, have not been recovered. Max Meisner and Charlie Walker are believed to have perished. The charred remains of four can be seen near the well. They cannot be recovered on account of the intensity of the heat.

Funerals This Afternoon.
Funerals for four of the victims of yesterday’s terrible oil field holocaust took place this afternoon. The bodies of W. A. (Ban) Phillips and Travis Owen were taken to Rural Shade were both were raised; Emmett Byrd was interred in Eureka, his former home, and Fred Craig was laid to rest at Chatfield, which was his childhood home.

The ladies of Corsicana and the Chamber of Commerce covered each of the caskets with magnificent flowers.

The remains of L. C. Sheek were sent to Dallas this afternoon and the body of W. A. Hicks will be sent to Wortham tomorrow.

The roustabout crew of 20 men working in the vicinity of the well escaped. Several teamsters and tank men were passing in and about the premises and rushed to the aid of the burning men, but the blaze had swept the bottom before they could be reached.

A negro teamster succeeded in loosening his team from the material wagon and escaped with them. The wagon and its contents were consumed.

Tragic Spectacle.
The scene about the well presented a sad and tragic spectacle when the monstrous explosion came. Both the day and the night crew consisting of twelve men had just started work a short while before. Several bystanders near the well escaped with their lives by running. It is believed that more dead bodies are in the burned area in addition to the known dead.

Men ran in every direction in a frenzy and fell when overcome.

Jimmy Meeks, oil field scout for the Humble Oil & Refining Company; E. W. Quinlin, scout for the Simms Oil Company; Ellis Hammel, drilling contractor; and DeWitt Watkins, members of the roustabout crew, did heroic work in attempting to save the men from their awful death.

Heroic Rescue Work.
Bravely defying all danger at the risk of their own lives rushed headlong to the burning prostrate forms of the groaning men in death agonies in answer to their piteous cries for help and succeeded in bringing them out. The men breathed their last as they were being carried out of the gas, smoke and fire.

Jim Ball escaped with B. B. Simmonds, N. M. Dunman and Dick Pyle. As they made their exit from the timber, Ball turned back to assist Owen. He succeeded in getting him into the open but too late to save his life. Charlie Lewis of Corsicana ran to the assistance of Bird.

Piteous cries for water went up from the two dying men as the ambulance brought them to the hospital.

Meeks, Quinlan, Hammel and Watkins returned towards the well for the other perishing men, but were unable to reach them. Their bodies had been practically reduced to ashes in the blaze which had gained headway. Waste oil in the bottom covering almost an acre upon which large trees saturated with oil had become enveloped in the frenzied inferno.

Quinlan is a world war hero. A native of New York State, he served in the French Army during the early days of the war. Later he served with the Canadian forces.

Quinlan is the possessor of several war medals. He was awarded the Medalto Militaire; the Croix Guerre, and while in the British he service he was the first American to be awarded the Victoria Cross. He received several hard jolts in the war, in the rescue work Wednesday the fumes and smoke temporarily almost overcame him.

Phone Girls Busy.
Shortly after three o’clock a man called the Johnson Drug Store from the Commercial Hotel and communicated the first news that reached Corsicana of the terrible disaster. The caller at the same time told Miss Valsey Hubbard, the operator, that he wanted every doctor available to go to the scene of the McKie well. The call was immediately referred to the chief operator. She rang the Corsicana Surgical and Medical clinic and asked that the doctors be sent. The hospital and every drug store in town were called to assist in every possible way. The undertaking parlors soon dispatched ambulances toward the fire. Emergency telephone calls from Powell, Kerens and Corsicana came pouring into the central office running as high as 2,400 calls per hour.

Frantic calls from various individuals were made in effort to locate the families of the dead and injured men.

Public memorial services will be held at the gospel tent at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., will withhold his regular revival services until after the memorial ceremonies.

The Chamber of Commerce today sent floral offerings to the families of the deceased. A suitable medal will be provided for the family of each man by the commercial organization in commemoration of their brave efforts towards the development of the oil resources of the county.

Among the members of the roustabout crew escaping are L. W. Wilkitz, E. W. Arnett, Whyne Short, J. W. Crosby, Jas. A. McDaniels, J. A. Story, Jim Ball, Ned Dumas, and Johnnie Kennon. The names of the other men have not been learned.

These men had been gathered up from various leases in the Mexia district and brought to assist in taking care of the well. The working record and the names of the men were in Mr. Allen’s pocket, and none of the surviving members are able to give the names of all the men.

Superintendent Walker of the city schools of Henrietta, and wife, father and mother of Mrs. S. P. Allen, and father of Charlie Walker, arrived in Corsicana early today.

Station Agent Wyatt and daughters of Plano, friends of the Walker family are also here.

Mr. Allen’s mother, and Miss Walker of Denton are also here. Miss Walker is a teacher in the Denton College of Industrial Arts. She is a sister of Mrs. Allen.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, May 10, 1923
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • His is also listed on the monument in Oakwood cemetery
  • s/o Thomas A. “Tom” Phillips and Sarah (Gresham) Phillips

---

MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN OIL FIRE

Memorial services in honor of the oil field workers who lost their lived in the big blaze at the Hughes-McKie well Wednesday will be held at the gospel tent, Eleventh street and Seventh avenue at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening.

The ceremonies will be conducted under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Mayor J. S. Eubank and members of the city administration, presidents of the Rotary, Lions, Civic, Advertising clubs, the Retail Merchants’ Association will occupy a place on the rostrum.

Every minister in town will take part in the program.

The ministers will conduct a prayer service. Hugh L. Hiett will sing.

Hon. Luther A. Johnson will make the address of condolence. Other speakers will take part.

Notes:

---

FUNERAL SUNDAY FOR REMAINING OIL FIRE VICTIMS

MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN BIG OIL FIELD FIRE WILL BE BURIED HERE

Funeral services for S. P. Allen, Charles Walker, Jim Phillips, C. M. Cooper, E. C. Cooper and L. C. Cook, fire victims of the burning Hughes-McKie oil well, will be held at the First Methodist Church at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon, according to announcement made today by W. S. Banks, attorney for the J. K. Hughes Development Company.

Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the church assisted by Rev. C. G. Vineer, pastor of the Church of Christ, will conduct the services.

The remains of the six bodies will be interred in one casket in a specially provided lot in Oakwood cemetery.

Active pallbearers will be Hon. Luther A. Johnson, Mayor J. S. Eubank, R. J. Jackson, Sam J. Jackson, John C. Calhoun, R. J. Graves, J. L. Halbert and W. H. Hastings.

The smouldering remains of the six men were recovered from the fire area of the ill-fated Hughes-McKie well several days after it caught fire May 9. They have been held at the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors pending the possible recovery of another body believed to have been undiscovered in the debris.

Seven of the perish crew were recovered from the fire shortly after the blaze started. Each were positively identified, and have been buried.

Mr. Banks stated today that the six remaining bodies had been sufficiently identified as to justify giving out the name of each. He stated the official casualty list of the J. K. Hughes Development company places the number of known dead and accounted for at 13. The list is as follows:

S. P. Allen, L. C. Cook, M. O. Turner, Charles Walker, Travis Owens, W. M. (Ban) Phillips, Jim Phillips, L. P. Sheek, W. A. Hicks, C. M. (Jack) Cooper, E. C. Cooper, Emmett G. Byrd, and Fred E. Craig.

One report carried the name of Max Meisner as among the dead and missing. Mr. Banks stated today that communication had been established with Mr. Meisner, and the Hughes company is certain he escaped injury. The company had the fire area thoroughly scorched by men clad in asbestos clothing, and no other body was found. Mr. Banks stated the company feels certain that the bodies of all men who perished in the fire has been found.

The J. K. Hughes Development Company has planned to erect a suitable monument over the grave of the six men to be buried in Oakwood cemetery in remembrance of the total number of its employees losing their lives in the big fire.

A change of plans for extinguishing the fire at the burning well late yesterday appears to have been extended the time before the blaze is stopped. W. H. McClintock has assembled a rig of his own making and patent, which he is confident will put out the fire when brought into play, but so far the apparatus has not been applied. Work was suspended at the well at 5 o’clock Friday, and nothing was done during the night. A different apparatus containing a T-joint and valve gear model has been completed, and efforts are being directed towards apply it before the McClintock machine is used.

Rain last night rendered the creek bottoms and the roads leading to the field in a very muddy condition. Transportation out from town was slow early today, which operated to cause some delay in getting work under way Saturday morning.

Although the roads were very slippery, teams and heavy trucks were on the road with tons of materials for the various new locations for drillings.

A meeting of the stockholders of the Cor-Tex Deep Well Company was held at the well just south of town at 3 o’clock this afternoon. Plans for resuming operations at the test were thoroughly gone over. Several interested individuals attended the meeting and reports are that much enthusiasm is evidenced over the proposed new operations there.

The test south of Blooming Grove to be put down by Dr. Stubbs and Dunbar spudded in at 4 o’clock. Several went out from Corsicana to see the bit take its first plunge into the surface. A local photographer was present to take a view of the rig and the crowds assembled to see the new test stared.

Notes:


Travis Purdon Owens
Jul. 8, 1891 - May 9, 1923

HUGHES-MCKIE WELL STILL BURNING—FOURTEEN KNOWN DEAD

THOUSANDS VISITED LOCATION OF GURNING WELL—CROWDS THRONGED THROUGH MORGUE VIEWING BODIES

Like an active volcano in eruption, belching forth terrific flames of burning fire constantly fed by the constant flow of oil and gas, the Hughes-McKie well in holocaust which has cost at least 14 men their lives, continues to gush forth its awful blaze at 3 o’clock today.

For twenty-four solid hours flames ranging from 30 feet to 150 feet have leaped high in the air in its spectacular capers. Red streaks of flame ascend as from a mighty nozzle, and disappear in the form of huge black clouds of smoke, which drift with the wind in a surging blast.

The wind switched from the southward during the night and the mighty smokestack releases its flow in the direction of Powell, leaving darkened elements in its wake.

Thousands hurried frantically to the fields during last night to witness the spectacular fire-works.

The well being situated on the east bank of the creek is surrounded by tall timber. A rough one-way traffic road forming a winding snake trail for two miles is the only means of vehicle access to the scene. The roads were choked with vehicle traffic within a short time after the fire started. This kept up all night.

The well has been fenced off and traffic barred on the narrow road to give the men full right of way in getting boilers to the location.

Every company owning equipment in the Powell fields has tendered the use of all available boilers and other equipment to extinguish the flame.

Men are working like Trojans to get the equipment in place. It will be necessary to use fire foam and steam from a dozen boilers.

The burned bodies of at least six men remain in the fire zone according to DeWitt Watkins, who is working at the well today. He stated to a reporter of the Sun this morning that five bodies could be seen near the well, and there was another one missing. He also stated he believed that one or two spectators perished.

Jim Ball foreman in charge of the work believes the final death toll will reach 18.

Mr. Hughes accompanied by J. S. Banks, his attorney, are at the well this afternoon checking up on the number of dead and missing.

Hundreds of spectators thronged in and out and lingered about the Sutherland Undertaking establishment all day Thursday eager to catch a glimpse of the charred bodies of a number of the working crew which perished in the big blaze Wednesday afternoon when the Hughes-McKie No. 1 well ignited.

Five of the bodies, charred and disfigured by the flames almost beyond recognition, were brought to the morgue early last night. They have been identified as follows:

W.A. PHILLIPS, Kerens.
W. A. HICKS, Wortham.
JACK COOPER, Corsicana.
FRED CRAIG, Roane.
L. P. SHEEK, Dallas.

The bodies of Travis Owen and Emmett Bird, both of Kerens, were brought from the Physicians and Surgeons hospital later in the night, Owen died at 7 o’clock and Bird died at 11:05 o’clock. These two men were dragged from the fire zone and hurried to Corsicana. Each lived only a few hours.

C. B. Keever, J. E. Keever, J. R. Ferris and Jesse Blair from the Keever Undertaking company at Ennis arrived early last night to assist in preparing the bodies for burial.

The bodies of S. P. Allen, field foreman; E. C. Cooper, driller; James Phillips, L. C. Coop, M. O. Turner, have not been recovered. Max Meisner and Charlie Walker are believed to have perished. The charred remains of four can be seen near the well. They cannot be recovered on account of the intensity of the heat.

Funerals This Afternoon.
Funerals for four of the victims of yesterday’s terrible oil field holocaust took place this afternoon. The bodies of W. A. (Ban) Phillips and Travis Owen were taken to Rural Shade were both were raised; Emmett Byrd was interred in Eureka, his former home, and Fred Craig was laid to rest at Chatfield, which was his childhood home.

The ladies of Corsicana and the Chamber of Commerce covered each of the caskets with magnificent flowers.

The remains of L. C. Sheek were sent to Dallas this afternoon and the body of W. A. Hicks will be sent to Wortham tomorrow.

The roustabout crew of 20 men working in the vicinity of the well escaped. Several teamsters and tank men were passing in and about the premises and rushed to the aid of the burning men, but the blaze had swept the bottom before they could be reached.

A negro teamster succeeded in loosening his team from the material wagon and escaped with them. The wagon and its contents were consumed.

Tragic Spectacle.
The scene about the well presented a sad and tragic spectacle when the monstrous explosion came. Both the day and the night crew consisting of twelve men had just started work a short while before. Several bystanders near the well escaped with their lives by running. It is believed that more dead bodies are in the burned area in addition to the known dead.

Men ran in every direction in a frenzy and fell when overcome.

Jimmy Meeks, oil field scout for the Humble Oil & Refining Company; E. W. Quinlin, scout for the Simms Oil Company; Ellis Hammel, drilling contractor; and DeWitt Watkins, members of the roustabout crew, did heroic work in attempting to save the men from their awful death.

Heroic Rescue Work.
Bravely defying all danger at the risk of their own lives rushed headlong to the burning prostrate forms of the groaning men in death agonies in answer to their piteous cries for help and succeeded in bringing them out. The men breathed their last as they were being carried out of the gas, smoke and fire.

Jim Ball escaped with B. B. Simmonds, N. M. Dunman and Dick Pyle. As they made their exit from the timber, Ball turned back to assist Owen. He succeeded in getting him into the open but too late to save his life. Charlie Lewis of Corsicana ran to the assistance of Bird.

Piteous cries for water went up from the two dying men as the ambulance brought them to the hospital.

Meeks, Quinlan, Hammel and Watkins returned towards the well for the other perishing men, but were unable to reach them. Their bodies had been practically reduced to ashes in the blaze which had gained headway. Waste oil in the bottom covering almost an acre upon which large trees saturated with oil had become enveloped in the frenzied inferno.

Quinlan is a world war hero. A native of New York State, he served in the French Army during the early days of the war. Later he served with the Canadian forces.

Quinlan is the possessor of several war medals. He was awarded the Medalto Militaire; the Croix Guerre, and while in the British he service he was the first American to be awarded the Victoria Cross. He received several hard jolts in the war, in the rescue work Wednesday the fumes and smoke temporarily almost overcame him.

Phone Girls Busy.
Shortly after three o’clock a man called the Johnson Drug Store from the Commercial Hotel and communicated the first news that reached Corsicana of the terrible disaster. The caller at the same time told Miss Valsey Hubbard, the operator, that he wanted every doctor available to go to the scene of the McKie well. The call was immediately referred to the chief operator. She rang the Corsicana Surgical and Medical clinic and asked that the doctors be sent. The hospital and every drug store in town were called to assist in every possible way. The undertaking parlors soon dispatched ambulances toward the fire. Emergency telephone calls from Powell, Kerens and Corsicana came pouring into the central office running as high as 2,400 calls per hour.

Frantic calls from various individuals were made in effort to locate the families of the dead and injured men.

Public memorial services will be held at the gospel tent at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., will withhold his regular revival services until after the memorial ceremonies.

The Chamber of Commerce today sent floral offerings to the families of the deceased. A suitable medal will be provided for the family of each man by the commercial organization in commemoration of their brave efforts towards the development of the oil resources of the county.

Among the members of the roustabout crew escaping are L. W. Wilkitz, E. W. Arnett, Whyne Short, J. W. Crosby, Jas. A. McDaniels, J. A. Story, Jim Ball, Ned Dumas, and Johnnie Kennon. The names of the other men have not been learned.

These men had been gathered up from various leases in the Mexia district and brought to assist in taking care of the well. The working record and the names of the men were in Mr. Allen’s pocket, and none of the surviving members are able to give the names of all the men.

Superintendent Walker of the city schools of Henrietta, and wife, father and mother of Mrs. S. P. Allen, and father of Charlie Walker, arrived in Corsicana early today.

Station Agent Wyatt and daughters of Plano, friends of the Walker family are also here.

Mr. Allen’s mother, and Miss Walker of Denton are also here. Miss Walker is a teacher in the Denton College of Industrial Arts. She is a sister of Mrs. Allen.

Notes:

---

MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN OIL FIRE

Memorial services in honor of the oil field workers who lost their lived in the big blaze at the Hughes-McKie well Wednesday will be held at the gospel tent, Eleventh street and Seventh avenue at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening.

The ceremonies will be conducted under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Mayor J. S. Eubank and members of the city administration, presidents of the Rotary, Lions, Civic, Advertising clubs, the Retail Merchants’ Association will occupy a place on the rostrum.

Every minister in town will take part in the program.

The ministers will conduct a prayer service. Hugh L. Hiett will sing.

Hon. Luther A. Johnson will make the address of condolence. Other speakers will take part.

The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, May 10, 1923 - Submitted by Diane Richards

FUNERAL SUNDAY FOR REMAINING OIL FIRE VICTIMS

MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN BIG OIL FIELD FIRE WILL BE BURIED HERE

Funeral services for S. P. Allen, Charles Walker, Jim Phillips, C. M. Cooper, E. C. Cooper and L. C. Cook, fire victims of the burning Hughes-McKie oil well, will be held at the First Methodist Church at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon, according to announcement made today by W. S. Banks, attorney for the J. K. Hughes Development Company.

Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the church assisted by Rev. C. G. Vineer, pastor of the Church of Christ, will conduct the services.

The remains of the six bodies will be interred in one casket in a specially provided lot in Oakwood cemetery.

Active pallbearers will be Hon. Luther A. Johnson, Mayor J. S. Eubank, R. J. Jackson, Sam J. Jackson, John C. Calhoun, R. J. Graves, J. L. Halbert and W. H. Hastings.

The smouldering remains of the six men were recovered from the fire area of the ill-fated Hughes-McKie well several days after it caught fire May 9. They have been held at the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors pending the possible recovery of another body believed to have been undiscovered in the debris.

Seven of the perish crew were recovered from the fire shortly after the blaze started. Each were positively identified, and have been buried.

Mr. Banks stated today that the six remaining bodies had been sufficiently identified as to justify giving out the name of each. He stated the official casualty list of the J. K. Hughes Development company places the number of known dead and accounted for at 13. The list is as follows:

S. P. Allen, L. C. Cook, M. O. Turner, Charles Walker, Travis Owens, W. M. (Ban) Phillips, Jim Phillips, L. P. Sheek, W. A. Hicks, C. M. (Jack) Cooper, E. C. Cooper, Emmett G. Byrd, and Fred E. Craig.

One report carried the name of Max Meisner as among the dead and missing. Mr. Banks stated today that communication had been established with Mr. Meisner, and the Hughes company is certain he escaped injury. The company had the fire area thoroughly scorched by men clad in asbestos clothing, and no other body was found. Mr. Banks stated the company feels certain that the bodies of all men who perished in the fire has been found.

The J. K. Hughes Development Company has planned to erect a suitable monument over the grave of the six men to be buried in Oakwood cemetery in remembrance of the total number of its employees losing their lives in the big fire.

A change of plans for extinguishing the fire at the burning well late yesterday appears to have been extended the time before the blaze is stopped. W. H. McClintock has assembled a rig of his own making and patent, which he is confident will put out the fire when brought into play, but so far the apparatus has not been applied. Work was suspended at the well at 5 o’clock Friday, and nothing was done during the night. A different apparatus containing a T-joint and valve gear model has been completed, and efforts are being directed towards apply it before the McClintock machine is used.

Rain last night rendered the creek bottoms and the roads leading to the field in a very muddy condition. Transportation out from town was slow early today, which operated to cause some delay in getting work under way Saturday morning.

Although the roads were very slippery, teams and heavy trucks were on the road with tons of materials for the various new locations for drillings.

A meeting of the stockholders of the Cor-Tex Deep Well Company was held at the well just south of town at 3 o’clock this afternoon. Plans for resuming operations at the test were thoroughly gone over. Several interested individuals attended the meeting and reports are that much enthusiasm is evidenced over the proposed new operations there.

The test south of Blooming Grove to be put down by Dr. Stubbs and Dunbar spudded in at 4 o’clock. Several went out from Corsicana to see the bit take its first plunge into the surface. A local photographer was present to take a view of the rig and the crowds assembled to see the new test stared.

Notes:

--

He is listed on the monument in Oakwood cemetery also

Travis Purdon Owens
Jul. 8, 1891 - May 9, 1923


HUGHES-MCKIE WELL STILL BURNING—FOURTEEN KNOWN DEAD

THOUSANDS VISITED LOCATION OF BURNING WELL—CROWDS THRONGED THROUGH MORGUE VIEWING BODIES

Like an active volcano in eruption, belching forth terrific flames of burning fire constantly fed by the constant flow of oil and gas, the Hughes-McKie well in holocaust which has cost at least 14 men their lives, continues to gush forth its awful blaze at 3 o’clock today.

For twenty-four solid hours flames ranging from 30 feet to 150 feet have leaped high in the air in its spectacular capers. Red streaks of flame ascend as from a mighty nozzle, and disappear in the form of huge black clouds of smoke, which drift with the wind in a surging blast.

The wind switched from the southward during the night and the mighty smokestack releases its flow in the direction of Powell, leaving darkened elements in its wake.

Thousands hurried frantically to the fields during last night to witness the spectacular fire-works.

The well being situated on the east bank of the creek is surrounded by tall timber. A rough one-way traffic road forming a winding snake trail for two miles is the only means of vehicle access to the scene. The roads were choked with vehicle traffic within a short time after the fire started. This kept up all night.

The well has been fenced off and traffic barred on the narrow road to give the men full right of way in getting boilers to the location.

Every company owning equipment in the Powell fields has tendered the use of all available boilers and other equipment to extinguish the flame.

Men are working like Trojans to get the equipment in place. It will be necessary to use fire foam and steam from a dozen boilers.

The burned bodies of at least six men remain in the fire zone according to DeWitt Watkins, who is working at the well today. He stated to a reporter of the Sun this morning that five bodies could be seen near the well, and there was another one missing. He also stated he believed that one or two spectators perished.

Jim Ball foreman in charge of the work believes the final death toll will reach 18.

Mr. Hughes accompanied by J. S. Banks, his attorney, are at the well this afternoon checking up on the number of dead and missing.

Hundreds of spectators thronged in and out and lingered about the Sutherland Undertaking establishment all day Thursday eager to catch a glimpse of the charred bodies of a number of the working crew which perished in the big blaze Wednesday afternoon when the Hughes-McKie No. 1 well ignited.

Five of the bodies, charred and disfigured by the flames almost beyond recognition, were brought to the morgue early last night. They have been identified as follows:

W.A. PHILLIPS, Kerens.
W. A. HICKS, Wortham.
JACK COOPER, Corsicana.
FRED CRAIG, Roane.
L. P. SHEEK, Dallas.

The bodies of Travis Owen and Emmett Bird, both of Kerens, were brought from the Physicians and Surgeons hospital later in the night, Owen died at 7 o’clock and Bird died at 11:05 o’clock. These two men were dragged from the fire zone and hurried to Corsicana. Each lived only a few hours.

C. B. Keever, J. E. Keever, J. R. Ferris and Jesse Blair from the Keever Undertaking company at Ennis arrived early last night to assist in preparing the bodies for burial.

The bodies of S. P. Allen, field foreman; E. C. Cooper, driller; James Phillips, L. C. Coop, M. O. Turner, have not been recovered. Max Meisner and Charlie Walker are believed to have perished. The charred remains of four can be seen near the well. They cannot be recovered on account of the intensity of the heat.

Funerals This Afternoon.
Funerals for four of the victims of yesterday’s terrible oil field holocaust took place this afternoon. The bodies of W. A. (Ban) Phillips and Travis Owen were taken to Rural Shade were both were raised; Emmett Byrd was interred in Eureka, his former home, and Fred Craig was laid to rest at Chatfield, which was his childhood home.

The ladies of Corsicana and the Chamber of Commerce covered each of the caskets with magnificent flowers.

The remains of L. C. Sheek were sent to Dallas this afternoon and the body of W. A. Hicks will be sent to Wortham tomorrow.

The roustabout crew of 20 men working in the vicinity of the well escaped. Several teamsters and tank men were passing in and about the premises and rushed to the aid of the burning men, but the blaze had swept the bottom before they could be reached.

A negro teamster succeeded in loosening his team from the material wagon and escaped with them. The wagon and its contents were consumed.

Tragic Spectacle.
The scene about the well presented a sad and tragic spectacle when the monstrous explosion came. Both the day and the night crew consisting of twelve men had just started work a short while before. Several bystanders near the well escaped with their lives by running. It is believed that more dead bodies are in the burned area in addition to the known dead.

Men ran in every direction in a frenzy and fell when overcome.

Jimmy Meeks, oil field scout for the Humble Oil & Refining Company; E. W. Quinlin, scout for the Simms Oil Company; Ellis Hammel, drilling contractor; and DeWitt Watkins, members of the roustabout crew, did heroic work in attempting to save the men from their awful death.

Heroic Rescue Work.
Bravely defying all danger at the risk of their own lives rushed headlong to the burning prostrate forms of the groaning men in death agonies in answer to their piteous cries for help and succeeded in bringing them out. The men breathed their last as they were being carried out of the gas, smoke and fire.

Jim Ball escaped with B. B. Simmonds, N. M. Dunman and Dick Pyle. As they made their exit from the timber, Ball turned back to assist Owen. He succeeded in getting him into the open but too late to save his life. Charlie Lewis of Corsicana ran to the assistance of Bird.

Piteous cries for water went up from the two dying men as the ambulance brought them to the hospital.

Meeks, Quinlan, Hammel and Watkins returned towards the well for the other perishing men, but were unable to reach them. Their bodies had been practically reduced to ashes in the blaze which had gained headway. Waste oil in the bottom covering almost an acre upon which large trees saturated with oil had become enveloped in the frenzied inferno.

Quinlan is a world war hero. A native of New York State, he served in the French Army during the early days of the war. Later he served with the Canadian forces.

Quinlan is the possessor of several war medals. He was awarded the Medalto Militaire; the Croix Guerre, and while in the British he service he was the first American to be awarded the Victoria Cross. He received several hard jolts in the war, in the rescue work Wednesday the fumes and smoke temporarily almost overcame him.

Phone Girls Busy.
Shortly after three o’clock a man called the Johnson Drug Store from the Commercial Hotel and communicated the first news that reached Corsicana of the terrible disaster. The caller at the same time told Miss Valsey Hubbard, the operator, that he wanted every doctor available to go to the scene of the McKie well. The call was immediately referred to the chief operator. She rang the Corsicana Surgical and Medical clinic and asked that the doctors be sent. The hospital and every drug store in town were called to assist in every possible way. The undertaking parlors soon dispatched ambulances toward the fire. Emergency telephone calls from Powell, Kerens and Corsicana came pouring into the central office running as high as 2,400 calls per hour.

Frantic calls from various individuals were made in effort to locate the families of the dead and injured men.

Public memorial services will be held at the gospel tent at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., will withhold his regular revival services until after the memorial ceremonies.

The Chamber of Commerce today sent floral offerings to the families of the deceased. A suitable medal will be provided for the family of each man by the commercial organization in commemoration of their brave efforts towards the development of the oil resources of the county.

Among the members of the roustabout crew escaping are L. W. Wilkitz, E. W. Arnett, Whyne Short, J. W. Crosby, Jas. A. McDaniels, J. A. Story, Jim Ball, Ned Dumas, and Johnnie Kennon. The names of the other men have not been learned.

These men had been gathered up from various leases in the Mexia district and brought to assist in taking care of the well. The working record and the names of the men were in Mr. Allen’s pocket, and none of the surviving members are able to give the names of all the men.

Superintendent Walker of the city schools of Henrietta, and wife, father and mother of Mrs. S. P. Allen, and father of Charlie Walker, arrived in Corsicana early today.

Station Agent Wyatt and daughters of Plano, friends of the Walker family are also here.

Mr. Allen’s mother, and Miss Walker of Denton are also here. Miss Walker is a teacher in the Denton College of Industrial Arts. She is a sister of Mrs. Allen.

Notes:

---

MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN OIL FIRE

Memorial services in honor of the oil field workers who lost their lived in the big blaze at the Hughes-McKie well Wednesday will be held at the gospel tent, Eleventh street and Seventh avenue at 7:45 o’clock Friday evening.

The ceremonies will be conducted under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Mayor J. S. Eubank and members of the city administration, presidents of the Rotary, Lions, Civic, Advertising clubs, the Retail Merchants’ Association will occupy a place on the rostrum.

Every minister in town will take part in the program.

The ministers will conduct a prayer service. Hugh L. Hiett will sing.

Hon. Luther A. Johnson will make the address of condolence. Other speakers will take part.

Notes:

----

FUNERAL SUNDAY FOR REMAINING OIL FIRE VICTIMS

MEN WHO LOST LIVES IN BIG OIL FIELD FIRE WILL BE BURIED HERE

Funeral services for S. P. Allen, Charles Walker, Jim Phillips, C. M. Cooper, E. C. Cooper and L. C. Cook, fire victims of the burning Hughes-McKie oil well, will be held at the First Methodist Church at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon, according to announcement made today by W. S. Banks, attorney for the J. K. Hughes Development Company.

Rev. Alonzo Monk, Jr., pastor of the church assisted by Rev. C. G. Vineer, pastor of the Church of Christ, will conduct the services.

The remains of the six bodies will be interred in one casket in a specially provided lot in Oakwood cemetery.

Active pallbearers will be Hon. Luther A. Johnson, Mayor J. S. Eubank, R. J. Jackson, Sam J. Jackson, John C. Calhoun, R. J. Graves, J. L. Halbert and W. H. Hastings.

The smouldering remains of the six men were recovered from the fire area of the ill-fated Hughes-McKie well several days after it caught fire May 9. They have been held at the Sutherland Undertaking Parlors pending the possible recovery of another body believed to have been undiscovered in the debris.

Seven of the perish crew were recovered from the fire shortly after the blaze started. Each were positively identified, and have been buried.

Mr. Banks stated today that the six remaining bodies had been sufficiently identified as to justify giving out the name of each. He stated the official casualty list of the J. K. Hughes Development company places the number of known dead and accounted for at 13. The list is as follows:

S. P. Allen, L. C. Cook, M. O. Turner, Charles Walker, Travis Owens, W. M. (Ban) Phillips, Jim Phillips, L. P. Sheek, W. A. Hicks, C. M. (Jack) Cooper, E. C. Cooper, Emmett G. Byrd, and Fred E. Craig.

One report carried the name of Max Meisner as among the dead and missing. Mr. Banks stated today that communication had been established with Mr. Meisner, and the Hughes company is certain he escaped injury. The company had the fire area thoroughly scorched by men clad in asbestos clothing, and no other body was found. Mr. Banks stated the company feels certain that the bodies of all men who perished in the fire has been found.

The J. K. Hughes Development Company has planned to erect a suitable monument over the grave of the six men to be buried in Oakwood cemetery in remembrance of the total number of its employees losing their lives in the big fire.

A change of plans for extinguishing the fire at the burning well late yesterday appears to have been extended the time before the blaze is stopped. W. H. McClintock has assembled a rig of his own making and patent, which he is confident will put out the fire when brought into play, but so far the apparatus has not been applied. Work was suspended at the well at 5 o’clock Friday, and nothing was done during the night. A different apparatus containing a T-joint and valve gear model has been completed, and efforts are being directed towards apply it before the McClintock machine is used.

Rain last night rendered the creek bottoms and the roads leading to the field in a very muddy condition. Transportation out from town was slow early today, which operated to cause some delay in getting work under way Saturday morning.

Although the roads were very slippery, teams and heavy trucks were on the road with tons of materials for the various new locations for drillings.

A meeting of the stockholders of the Cor-Tex Deep Well Company was held at the well just south of town at 3 o’clock this afternoon. Plans for resuming operations at the test were thoroughly gone over. Several interested individuals attended the meeting and reports are that much enthusiasm is evidenced over the proposed new operations there.

The test south of Blooming Grove to be put down by Dr. Stubbs and Dunbar spudded in at 4 o’clock. Several went out from Corsicana to see the bit take its first plunge into the surface. A local photographer was present to take a view of the rig and the crowds assembled to see the new test stared.

Notes:


Alma S. Fluker
Mar 15, 1912 - Jan 27, 2012

Alma S. Fluker, 99, of Wake Village, TX died Friday, January 27, 2012 in a local nursing home. Mrs. Fluker was born in Corsicana, TX. She was a member First Baptist Church-Downtown where she was past director of the Adult Sunday School Dept. for many years.

Mrs. Fluker was preceded in death by her husband Percy L. Fluker in 1981. She is survived by a nephew Dr. Earnest Butler of Austin, TX; one great nephew Jason Beene of Ft. Worth, TX; friends Patsy and Johnny Pascarella of Texarkana, TX; care giver Dale Anne Johnson of Texarkana, TX

Graveside funeral service will be 3 P.M. Monday at Hillcrest Memorial Park with Rev. Dennis Gibbons officiating.

Memorials may be made to First Baptist Church-Downtown

Condolences may be left at www.eastfuneralhomes.com

Services are under direction of East Funeral Home-Downtown


Notes:


Navarro County TXGenWeb
© Copyright March, 2009
Edward L. Williams & Barbara Knox