Articles about Navarro County Men Killed in WWI
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A Few Brief Facts Concerning The Navarro County Boys Who Made The Supreme Sacrifice

Following is a list of the boys from Navarro county who made the supreme sacrifice during the world war, whether being killed on the battlefield or dying of disease in France or at the various army camps throughout the country. After untiring work this list has been compiled and is believed to be correct:

LEROY ANDREWS—Killed in action. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service May 25, 1918. Was 24 years and 9 months old at time of death. Private. Body buried in France. Was single. Belonged to 143d Casual company. Name of parents of deceased, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Andrews, Roane, Texas, R. R. No. 1.

GEORGE LUTHER VINSON-Died of pneumonia. Died in Germany; sick not over twelve days. Trained at Camp Travis. Entered service March 4, 1918. Thirty years old. Artilleryman. Buried in cemetery in France. Was single. Belonged to Battery D, 324 American Expeditionary Forces. Both parents dead. Rev. R. A. Vinson- and Mrs. N. J. Vinson of Corsicana, Texas. Address of deceased, Corsicana, Texas.

CHARLES BENARD JOHNSON—Died as result of being gassed with mustard gas. Died in Base Hospital No. 46, France. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered service September 20,1917. Age at time of death, 25years. Was private at time of death. Buried in France. Was single, with no immediate family. Belonged to Co. H, 359th Infantry. He was gassed in the last  engagement of the Argonne  September 28th, and died November 4th, 1918. Parents dead, but left numerous relatives in Corsicana, where he made his home.

ARNOLD McELROY—Died of meningitis. Died at Base Hospital No. 56, Allerey, Saone-et-Loire, France. Trained at Camp Joseph E. Johnston, Florida. Entered service May 25, 1918. Was 29 years, 2 months and 17 days old. Was Corporal. Buried in the American Cemetery, Ellesey Saone-et-Loire, France. Was single. Belonged to 337th Butchery Co. Home was at Dawson, Texas. Parents, Bessie and Joseph M. McElroy, Dawson, Texas. 

WALTER DUNN PHILLIPS—Died of pneumonia. Was sick fifteen days at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service on September 7th, 1917. Age at time of death, 28 years. Died April 20, 1918. Rank not given. Was single. Belonged to Co. G. 359th Infantry. His home was at Blooming Grove, Texas. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Phillips, Blooming Grove, Texas.

WILLIE GREER—Killed in action November 3rd, 1918. Place of death not given. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service on October 20, 1917. Was 25 years of age. Corporal._ Body buried at Meuse, in the Verdun Sector. Was single. Belonged to Co. D, 359th infantry, Ninetieth Division. Mother, Mrs. Mattie Greer, Corsicana, Texas, R. R. No. 4.

EGBERT PAUL COLUMBUS FULTON-Killed in action. October 18th, 1918; killed near the town of Arbre Guernon. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas, and Camp Gordon, Newport News, Va. Entered the service on March 30, 1918.  Was 24 years, 2 months and 6 days old. Was private.  Body buried near the town of St. Souplet. Plot A, row 3,_g5.,...Belonged to Co. M, 105th Infantry, Twenty-Seventh Division: Father is dead. -Mother, Mrs. Ida Butcher Fulton, Blooming Grove, Texas. Address of deceased, Blooming Grove, Texas.

LEONADAS ALPHONSO SUGGSDied of influenza pneumonia, at Camp Dix, New Jersey. Was sick thirteen days. Trained at Camp Cody, New Mexico. Entered the service August 5, 1918. Age, 29 years, 11 months and 17 days. Was a private. Body buried in the Frost cemetery, Frost, Texas. Was single. Belonged to Co. E, 133d Infantry, Thirty-fourth Division. Address of deceased when he entered the service, Mertens, Hill County, Texas, Mrs. Fannie Woodward, R. F. D. No. 5, Mart, Texas.

SAMUEL LEVY JACKSON—Died of wounds received in action, October 4th, 1918. Died same day on which he was wounded, but was carried to the hospital before he died. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service in October, 1917. Was 28 years of age. Corporal. Body buried somewhere in France. Was single. Belonged to Co. E, 360th Infantry, 180th Brigade, Ninetieth Divison. Address of deceased, San Benito, Cameron Co., Texas. Mother has been dead 20 years. Father, John Martin Jackson, Chatfield, Texas.

WATT CRINSHAW WATERS—Died following an operation for appendicitis. Died at San Diego, Cal.; sick four days. Trained at Mare Island and Balbo Park, Entered the service June 21, 1918. Was 18 years of age. Was an apprentice seaman, U. S. N.R.F. Body buried in the Waters cemetery, Corbet, Texas. Was single. Belonged to Navy, Battalion A, Company 2. Parents, Tom W. and Leola M. Waters, Corbet, Texas.

JESSE BENJAMIN JONES—Killed in action by shell fire in the Argonne Forest, October 10th, 1918. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service in 1917. Was 23 years of age. Private, first class. Body buried in Grave 19, American Cemetery, Boir de Fays. Was single. Belonged to Thirty-Ninth Infantry, Fourth Division. Address of deceased When he entered the service, Roane, Texas. Parents, Robert Napoleon Jones, Melissa Deliah Jones, Roane, Texas.

SAMUEL FRANKLIN CROUCH—Died of pneumonia. Died at Coblenz, Germany. Sick about three weeks. Died January 19, 1919. Trained at Camp Lee, Virginia. Entered the service June 24, 1918. Born February 9, 1896. Was a private. Body buried in the United States cemetery, Coblenz, Germany. Was single. Belonged to Army Veterinary Evacuation Sector No. 3. Parents, Frank S. and Willie Crouch, Frost, Texas, R. R. No. 2. Deceased left home June 24, 1918; went to Camp Travis; left Camp Travis July 13; went to Camp Lee, Virginia. Landed in Brest, France, November 9, 1918.

WALTER ERNEST ELLIS—Died of pneumonia, at Camp Travis, Texas. Was sick six days. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service September 6th, 1918. Was 22 years and 2 months of age. Was a private. Body buried in the Frost cemetery, Frost, Texas. Was single. Belonged to the infantry, 25th Co., 165th Division, Depot Brigade. Address of deceased, Frost, Texas. Parents, Wilson Owins and Margaret M. Ellis, Frost, Texas.

LEWIS ADYN LYNCH—Died of pneumonia, at La Rochelle, France. Was sick about two weeks. Trained at Camps Travis and Johnston. Entered the service May 25th, 1918. Was 27 years, 11 months and 18 days old. Was private. Body is buried at St. Eloi, one mile from La Rochelle. Was single. Belonged to F. R. S. No. 323, Q. M. C., Service of Supply. Address of deceased, Corsicana, Texas. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis A. Lynch, Corsicana, Texas.

FRANK C. BENSON—Died of pneumonia. Died at Camp Merritt, New Jersey. Was sick only five days, trained at Leon Springs, Texas. Entered the service May 12, 1917. Was 25 years and 7 months old at time of death. Was a first lieutenant. Body buried in Oakwood cemetery, Corsicana, Texas. Was single. Belonged to Ninth Detachment, Administration Labor Company Commander. Address of deceased, Corsicana, Texas. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. N. L. Benson, Corsicana, Texas.

CLYDE PETTY—Killed in action. Instantly killed in the fighting at Meuse, in the Verdun Sector. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service April 26, 1918. Age, 23 years. Was a private. Body buried at Communo Banthteville Meuse, France. Was single. Belonged to Company D, 359th Infantry, Ninetieth Division. Address of deceased, Richland, Texas. Mother dead. Father, Alfred A. Fetty, Brenham, Texas.

WILLIAM AUST BOLT—Died of pneumonia. Died in the Base Hospital No. 65. Was sick about fifty days. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service June 24th, 1918. Aged 22 years and 8 months. Was a private. Buried in Kerhoun Cemetery, France. Was single. Was a private in the Q. M. C., S. A. R. D., Camp Jackson. Address of deceased, Rice, Texas, R. No. 1. Mother, Julia A. Bolt, is dead. Father, John T. Bolt, Rice, Texas, R. No. 1

DAVID HUBBARD STEELY—Died of disease. Died at sea, December 6th, 1918. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas and Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Entered the service July 23d, 1918. Aged 31 years. Was a private. Body buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Corsicana, Texas. Was married. Left a wife. Belonged to Battery A, 127th Field Artillery. Address of deceased, Corsicana, Texas. Mother, Mrs. Matilda Steely, Corsicana, Texas.

LEWIS WIGGINS—Killed in action, November 4th, 1918. He fell at Andavanne. a small town about four miles from Dun-Sur-Meuse. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service March 1, 1918. Was 28 years of age. Was a sergeant. Body buried where he fell (Andavanne, France.) Was single. Belonged to Co. D, 360th Infantry, Ninetieth Division. Address of deceased, 102 East First Avenue, Corsicana, Texas. Parents, Wm. and Mary F. Wiggins, 102 East First Avenue, Corsicana, Texas.

JAMES OTIS JOHNSON—Killed in action, October 9th, 1918. Killed while advancing on enemy in the battle, of St. Etienna. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service May 25th, 1918. Was 23 years of age. Was a private. Body is buried at St. Etienne, France. Was single. Belonged to Co. B, 142d Infantry, Thirty-Sixth Division. Address of deceased, Dawson, Texas. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Johnson, Dawson, Texas.

ROBERT BROWN GILBREATH—Killed in action. Killed in the Argonne Forrest, France. Trained at Loon Springs, Texas. Entered the service in May. 1917. Was 25 years of age. Was a lieutenant. Body was buried on the battle ground. Was single. Belonged to 358th Infantry, Ninetieth Division. Address of deceased at time of entering service, Corsicana, Texas. Parents, J. A. Gilbreath, Mrs. Agnes Gilbreath, Columbia, Tenn.

CHARLIE LAWRENCE SOWELL—Killed in action. Charlie was in the Medical Detachment, 143d Infantry, Thirty-Sixth Division. He with twelve other boys, were going to the front when a high explosive shell killed sevenand wounded six. Captain Dubart Miller of Corsicana was his captain. He trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service May 25th, 1918. Was 28 years of age. Was a private. Body is buried one mile north of Somme Py, France. Was single. Belonged to Medical Detachment, 143d Infantry, Thirty-Sixth Division. Address of deceased at time of entering service, Dawson, Texas, Parents, Mr. James M Sowell, Mrs. Fannie E. Sowell, Dawson, Texas.

STEPHEN ASBERRY GRAVES—Killed in action in France. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service October 7th, 1917. Was 28 years of age. Was a corporal. Body buried in France. Was single, leaving a mother, two sisters and four brothers. Belonged to 357th Infantry, Ninetieth Division. Address of deceased when he entered the service, Hamon, Oklahoma. Mother, Sophronia Monia Graves, Kerens, Texas, R. R. No. 1.

BENJAMIN EDWARD McGEHEE—Killed in action, November 9th, 1918. Killed in the Argonne Forest, France. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service October, 1917. Was 27 years of age. Was a private. Body buried in the American cemetery, near Dom Villers, France. Was single. Belonged to Company M, 314th Infantry, Seventy-Ninth Division. Address of deceased at time he entered service was Purdon, Texas. Mother, Mrs. A. A. McGehee, Purdon, Texas.

ROBERT HENRY WASSON—Died of spinal meningitis. Died at Great Lakes, Illinois. Was sick 19 days. Trained at Great Lakes, Illinois. Enteredthe service May 5th, 1917. Was 19 years of age. Was an apprentice seaman.Body buried in the cemetery at Chatfield, Texas. Was single. Belonged to the United States Navy. Address of deceased at time of entering service Rice, Texas. Parents, Mrs. Violet Clark Gallemore, mother; James A. Gallemore, stepfather, Corsicana, Texas.

LOUIS C. MORRIS—Died of influenza and pneumonia in the Base Hospital at Camp MacArthur, Waco, Texas. Was sick six days. Trained at Camps Travis and McArthur, Texas. Entered the service June 24th, 1918. Was 24 years, 4 months and 14 days old. Was private in Provost Guard Co., Military Police. Body buried in Oakwood cemetery, Corsicana, Texas. Was single, leaving a father, mother, five brothers and two sisters. Belonged to the Military Police. Address of deceased when he entered the service, Corsicana, Texas. Parents, Wm. F. Morris, Mrs. Jennie Morris, 410 East Tenth Avenue, Corsicana, Texas. 

OSCAR EDMOND WILSON—Died of pneumonia, October 14th, 1918. Died at sea. Trained at Camp Hancock, Ga. Entered the service July 23d, 1918. Age, 25 years. Was a sergeant. Body buried in Hopewell cemetery, Navarro County, Texas. Was single. Belonged to 27th P. O. D. Co., 2nd Reg. Address of deceased when he entered the service, Corsicana, Texas, R. R. No. 4. Parents dead.

DAVID E. STOCKMAN—Killed in action in the Argonne-Meuse Sector, in France. Trained at Camp Travis, Texas. Entered the service February 25th, 1918. Was 23 years, 7 months and 23 days old at time of death. Was a corporal. Body is buried near Batheville, France. Was married. Left a wife and baby. Belonged to Company D, 359th Infantry, Ninetieth Division, A. E. F. Address at time of entering the service, Mount Calm, Texas. Parents, W. D. and L. V. Stockman, Mount Calm, Texas.

ARTHUR C. LOPER—Accidentally killed between Orleans and Giervs, France. Trained at Great Lakes, Ill. Entered the service in April, 1917. Was 24 years and 4 months old. Was Pharmacist Mate, First Class, and had just taken examinations for Chief Pharmacist Mate. Body is buried in the A. E. F. Cemetery, Giervs, France. Was single. Belonged to the 11th Regular United States Marines, Second Division. Address of deceased when he entered the srvice, Corsicana, Texas. Parents, W. B. Loper, Mabank Texas R. F. D. N. 2.

LUTHER ELIHU DICKEY—Died of disease. Wounded September 13th 1918; died of disease, February 6th, 1919, at Cannes, France. Trained at Camp Travis. Entered the service on April 26th, 1918. Was 30 years of age. Was a private. Buried in the French cemetery at Hgere, France. Was single. Belonged to a machine gun company of the Ninetieth Division. Mother Mrs. Virginia Dickey, Emmet, Arkansas.

WILLIAM VARDAMAN KEEL—Died of bronchial pneumonia. Died at Camp Johnston, Jacksonville, Florida. Sick 7 days. Trained at Camp Joseph E. Johnston, Florida. Entered the service December 11th, 1917 Was 31 years and 10 months old. Was a corporal. Body buried in the Birdston cemetery, Navarro county. Was single, leaving a father and three brothers Belonged to Motor Transport Co. No. 397. Address of deceased when he entered the service, Streetman, Texas. Parents, John Vardaman Keel and Mattie Keel (deceased), Streetman, Texas.

ISAIAH D. ADAMS—Killed in action on battlefields of France Trained at Camp Travis. Entered the service September 20th, 1917 Was 21 years 10 months and 14 days old. Rank not known. Body is buried in France Was single, leaving a father, mother, brothers and sisters Branch of service to which he belonged is not known. Address of deceased when he entered service, Hubbard, Texas, R. F. D. No. 5. Father, Hugh Adams Crockett, Texas R. F. D. No. 2 Box 46.

ANDREW PERRY ALLISON—Struck and killed instantly by the French Express while guarding his train of soldiers during a blinding beating sleet and wind storm, at a switch near Mussey France Trained at Camp Kearney, San Diego, California. Entered the service as a volunteer in July, 1917, at Albuquerque, New Mexico. Ranching eighty miles from his post office, he heard of the June 5, 1917, registration only after the date set for same, wound up his business as best he could quickly and went with a few companions to Albuquerque and joined what might have been called a "Rough Rider" outfit, being an expert rider, was at once placed in the Mounted Police Division of service and served in this capacity until his death. Was 24 years of age. Was a First Class Private.  Body is buried in the United States, Cemetery, Mussy, France. Was single. Belonged to Co M, 40th Division, Mounted Police. Parents, Andrew Perry Allison and Ruthia Allison, both deceased, the former, his father, having died before the subject of this sketch was born and his mother dying when he was 6 years old after which he lived with his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Allison at Groesbeck, until a few years ago, when they removed to Corsicana and he went West.


Submitted by Diane Richards

LARGE CROWD WAS PRESENT

Corsicana Pays Tribute to the Fallen Boys of Navarro County

A large crowd was present yesterday afternoon at the Y. M. C. A. , for the purpose of paying tribute to the memory of the boys from Navarro County who fell in the great war just brought to a close. The gymnasium was filled with chairs and most of these seats were taken. The United States flag, and the service flag of the Y. M. C. A. adorned the front of the room, behind the speakers table.
The band of the I. O. O. F. Widows and Orphans Home furnished the music for the occasion.
The program opened by the singing of
America by everyone present under the leadership of Miss Sadie Rafferty, director of music in the city schools. The Invocation was delivered by Rev. Cullom H. Booth, pastor of the First Methodist church.
After a selection by the band, Gov. George T. Jester, chairman of the afternoon’s program made a few remarks upon the fitness of such a program. Gov. Jester paid a tribute to the memory of these boys who went out with the others at the beginning of the war, but will never have the privilege of returning with the other boys who will come home victorious,
Mr. Jester then introduced Hon. Dexter Hamilton who delivered an address on The Service Star. Mr. Hamilton said that the same spirit that was born under the star of Bethlehem has been reincarnated in the American Service Star. Mr. Hamilton paid a tribute to the mighty preparation that America made when she entered the war. He said that history records many wars, and she records many deeds of heroism. But never does history record the warlike efforts of a nation, he said, that can compare to the efforts that were put forth by America in bringing the great struggle to a successful close.
Mr. Hamilton reviewed the causes that brought America into the war. He said she entered the struggle with a calm determination, and as a result of this the fighting was brought to a successful close. Mr. Hamilton said that the service flag is the emblem of the American father and mother. The American army, he said, was the direct cause of the Huns laying down their arms. No human influence, he said, can stop an American army. We can always look back upon America’s record in the war with a great deal of satisfaction, said Mr. Hamilton in conclusion. And the greatest thing that we can get from the struggle is the knowledge that American ideals, and those things upon which our nation is founded is being transplanted into the League of Nations, and these will be an international conscience.
Rev. H. J. Ellis, rector of the St. John’s Episcopal Church read the list of Navarro County’s dead. While this list was being read the entire audience stood. The list that Rev. Mr. Ellis read was as follows:
First Lieutenant Frank C. Benson, Corsicana; died of disease.
Sergeant Steve A. Groves, Kerens; killed in action (Sergeant Groves was the first Navarro County man to fall)
Corporal Lewis Wiggins, Corsicana; killed in action.
Corporal Willie Greer, Corsicana; killed in action.
Corporal Sam Jackson, Corsicana; killed in action.
Private Charles B. Johnson, Corsicana; died of wounds.
Private Egbert P. C. Fulton, Blooming Grove; killed in action.
Private James O. Johnson, Dawson; killed in action.
Private Lewis A. Lynch, Corsicana; died of disease.
Private Charlie Sowell, Dawson; killed in action.
Private William A. Bolt, Rice; died of disease.
Private Le Roy Andrews, Roane; died of disease.
Private Oscar Wilson, Corsicana; died of disease.
Private Clyde Fetty, Richland; killed in action.
Private Arnold McElroy, Dawson; died of disease.
Private Perry A. Allison, Corsicana; died of disease and accident.
Private David H. Steely, Corsicana; died of disease.
Private Jesse B. Jones, Roane; killed in action.
Private George L. Vinson, Eureka; died of disease.
Private Calvin C. Clow, Dawson; killed in action.
Private Benjamin E. McGehee, Purdon; killed in action.
Private Lonny Suggs, Frost; died of disease.
The next portion of the program was the demobilization of the Y. M. C. A. service flag by Assistant Secretary Pat Ramsey. The Y’s flag contains 133 blue stars and 4 gold ones. There are eighteen men represented on this flag who have been demobilized. Over these eighteen stars Secretary Ramsey pinned a red strip of cloth. The four gold stars on the Y’s flag represent First Lieutenant Frank C. Benson, First Lieutenant Robert B. Gilbreath, Private Charles. R. Johnson and Private David H. Steely.
After this Lee McRogers of the Odd Fellows Home Band sounded taps on the cornet.
A. Hastings Harrison, formerly Boys’ Secretary of the Y was the next speaker. Mr. Harrison recently returned from France where he saw four months service. Mr. Harrison’s subject was Our Boys Still Over There. He recited some of his experiences in England and France. He then told of how the others over there wanted to come home just as bad as he did. But they must stay and help reconstruct the country, and occupy Germany, he said. Mr. Harrison said that while the fighting had ceased the war was not over. There is much to be done yet, he said, and every man must continue to do his part. He said that there are many who said “ I did my part while the war was on, but now I am going to stop.” Mr. Harrison branded such men as deserters. He said that if every man who has to stay in Germany and France would take that attitude they would be court-martialed as traitors. He stressed the point that the war is not yet ended.
A vocal solo by Miss Aline Harper was greatly enjoyed.
Hon. Roswell Thomas of Dallas was the last speaker. Mr. Thomas spoke briefly on account of the length of the program but his words were well received and they told many truths. He said that on such a day as this we should extend our words or our tribute to not only the soldiers of Navarro County or to the State of Texas, but we should remember the soldiers of all the allies who fought with us. We owe the allies a great debt. Had it not been for the British Navy, said Mr. Thomas, the war would have been lost before we ever entered it.
He paid tribute to Belgium and to France and to Italy, to whom he said we owe a great debt. But the Allies owe us a debt, he said , that can never be paid. If American had not entered the war it would have been lost.
Mr. Thomas said that there are some things that are worth dying for. He told of some of the atrocities of the Germans and Turks, and said that these things were worth dying for. He paid a tribute to the many boys who died in the war.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Monday, February 24, 1919
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
     

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