Obituaries from
Navarro County, Texas


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Tinnie Lou (Putman) Sykes
May 28, 1893 - Nov 14, 1971

Mrs. Sykes

Services for Mrs. Tennie Lou Sykes, 81, will be Tuesday at 2 p.m. in Corley Funeral Chapel.

Burial is to be in Brushie Prairie Cemetery.

Mrs. Sykes, a native of Dawson, had lived in Dallas since 1953. She was a member of the Methodist Church.

Survivors include four sons, R. C. Sykes of Dawson, Ray Sykes of Hillsboro, Lee and Wayne Sykes both of Kemah; three daughters, Miss Juanita Sykes and Mrs. Lonnie Perkins, both of Dallas and Mrs. Cecil Harrison of Houston; two brothers, V. E. Putman and George Putman both of Dawson; three sisters, Mrs. Ida Nesmith of Dawson, Mrs. Pearlie Phillips of Mexia and Mrs. Genila Sykes of Grapevine and six grandchildren.

Nephews will be pallbearers.

Notes:


Edmond Dawson Sykes
Jun 15, 1882 - Jul 2, 1936

Died in Local Hospital.

E. D. Sykes of Hubbard City, died Thursday in the P. and S. hospital. The body was taken to Hubbard City. He was the father of Floyd Sykes of Corsicana.

Notes:


Candis Ophelia (Woods) Bratcher
Dec 13, 1894 - Jul 20, 1972

Mrs. Bratcher
Services for Mrs. W. L. Bratcher, 77, were at 3:30 p.m. Friday here with Rev. W. O. Estes officiating. Burial was in Brushie Prairie Cemetery with grandsons as pallbearers. She died Thursday.

Surviving are two sons, two daughters, nine grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and three sisters.

Notes:

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Funeral services for Mrs. W.L. Bratcher, 78, are scheduled for 3:30 p.m. Friday in Corley Funeral Chapel. Burial will follow in Brushie Prairie Cemetery. She died Thursday morning in Corsicana.

She is survived by two sons, Jim Bratcher of Mertens and G.W. Bratcher of Corsicana; two daughters, Mrs. Alma Kendall of Corsicana and Mrs. Sue Adams of Mexia; nine grandchildren; four great grandchildren; and three sisters, Mrs. O.B. Walden of Itasca, Mrs. Bill Shannon of Waco and Mrs. Clyde Scott of Grand Prairie.

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Jewell (Key) Nutt
Jan 12, 1912 - Oct 7, 1972

Mrs. Nutt

Funeral services are scheduled for 2 p.m. Monday at Griffin Funeral Chapel for Mrs. Jewell Nutt, 60, of Corsicana who died at her residence Saturday morning.

Rev. W. M. Biggs, Rev. Hoyt Hefner and Rev. James T. Davis will officiate. Burial will be in Brushie Prairie Cemetery.

Survivors include her husband, J. S. Nutt of Corsicana; a son, Freddy Nutt of Corsicana; three daughters, Mrs. Sonda Davis of Corsicana, Mrs. Glenda Vandygriff of Corsicana and Mrs. Edna Kelly of Farmers Branch; her parents, Rev. and Mrs. W. B. Key of Corsicana; four grandsons; one granddaughter; a sister, Mrs. Sadie Moore of Corsicana; and a number of nieces, nephews and other relatives.

Pallbearers will be Leroy Barton, Charles Brannon, Sharror Trent, Tommy Kemp, Johnny Wolley and Lynn McCarey.

Notes:


William Briscoe Key, Rev.
Mar 28, 1886 - Jul 20, 1977

Rev. W. B. Key

Services will be at 3 p.m. Friday at the Corley Funeral Home Chapel for the Rev. W. B. Key, resident of Corsicana, who died Wednesday.

The Revs. Hoyt Heifner, J. T. Davis and W. M. Biggs will officiate, with burial following at Brushie Prairie Cemetery.

Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Jossie Key of Corsicana; a daughter, Mrs. J. R. Moore of Corsicana; a sister, Mrs. Bertha Burnham of Stanford, two grandsons, three granddaughters, and eight great-grandchildren.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Thursday, July 21, 1977
  • h/o Jossie (Bruton) Key married May 10, 1908 in Hill Co. Texas; s/o William Austin Key & Hannah Ellen (Gibson) Key
  • Submitted by Diane Richards

Mary Frances (Pruitt) Moore-Raley
Jul 1, 1869 - Dec 18, 1936

MRS. W. A. RALEY PASSED AWAY FRIDAY; BURIAL ON SATURDAY

Funeral services for Mrs. W. A. Raley, aged 67 years, who died at the family home in the Salem community near the Hill-Navarro county line Friday morning at 7:30 o’clock, were held Saturday at noon at Brushy Prairie where interment was made.

Mrs. Raley had been in ill health for some time, but her condition did not become critical until a short time before death.

Prior to moving to the Salem community 16 years ago, the family had resided in the Brushy Prairie community for a number of years.

Surviving are her husband, a son, Jim Moore, Dallas; two step-daughters, Miss Della Raley, Salem, and Mrs. Cora Toten, Emmett; two sisters, and a number of other relatives.

Mrs. Raley was an aunt of Mrs. K. A. Blakney of Corsicana.

Notes:


Louisa J. (Maxwell) Raley
Aug 12, 1847 - Aug 12, 1925

(Dawson Herald)

Grandma Raley Dead

Grandma Raley, who made her home with her son, Abe Raley of Brushy Prairie community, died Wednesday morning at 11:15 o’clock. The funeral service was held at Brushy Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock.

Grandma Raley had been in very bad health for some time and her death was no surprise. She had reached the age of 78, years on the date of her death. We understand she is survived by six grown children.

Notes:


James Mack "Jim" French, Sr.
Jan 5, 1887 - Dec 29, 1950

Jim M. French

Funeral services for Jim Mack French, 62, of Eureka, who died in the P. and S. Hospital Friday morning, were held Saturday at 3 p.m. from the Brushy Prairie Methodist church.

Burial was in the Brushie Prairie Cemetery. The rites were conducted by Rev. G. W. French, Methodist minister of Fort Worth.

He was a native of Emmett.

Surviving are his wife, Eureka; six sons, R. D. and C. E. French, both of Irving; J. M., Jr., and Maurice French, both of Eureka; J. F. French, Corsicana, and Lonnie French, Mexia; three daughters, Mrs. Edna Burrow and Mrs. Gladys Burge, both of Corsicana and Miss Bonnie French, Fort Worth; mother, Mrs. Fannie French, Fort Worth; four brothers, George French, Bristol; Troy French, Fort Worth; Sam French, Dawson, and Carroll French, Chickasha, Okla.; seven sisters, Mrs. Ruth Watts, Mrs. Eunice Smith and Mrs. Bettye Faulkner, all of Fort Worth; Mrs. Allie Gober, Sweetwater; Mrs. Eva Haynes, Malakoff; Mrs. Etta Moore, Dawson and Mrs. Lou Douglas, Chickasha, and other relatives.

Pallbearers were H. E. Watts, J. C. Haynes, C. E. Faulkner, Leon Smith, P. L. Burge and Preston Burge, Jr.

Corley directed.

Notes:


John L. Raley
Sep 1, 1895 - Nov 22, 1945

RITES ON SUNDAY FOR JOHN RALEY AT BRUSHY PRAIRIE

Funeral services for John Raley, 60, Tomball garage operator, who died Thursday in a Conroe hospital will be held at the Brushy Prairie church Sunday afternoon with interment in the Brushie Prairie Cemetery. The Masonic Lodge will have charge of the rites.

Raley was reared in the Brushy Prairie community and formerly was a member of the Corsicana fire department.

Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Gilliam Wright; a sister, Mrs. K. A. Blakney, both of Corsicana, and other relatives.

The funeral cortege leaves the McCammon Funeral Chapel Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

Notes:


James Roy Coleman
Nov 28, 1945 - Dec 1, 1989

James Colema

James Roy Coleman, 44, of St. Louis, died Dec. 1, 1989, in St. Louis.

Services are pending at Griffin Roughton Funeral Home. Burial will be at the Cade Cemetery in Streetman.

He is survived by his wife, Sheila Coleman of St. Louis; one son, Chris Coleman, one daughter Courtney Coleman of St. Louis, his mother, Edith Coleman of Houston and one brother Gary Coleman.

Notes:


Francis Slocum “Sloc” Coleman
Oct 25, 1896  -  Nov 6, 1959

F. S. Coleman Rites Sunday

Francis S. (Sloc) Coleman, 63, carpenter, died in Houston Friday.

Funeral services were held Sunday at 2 p.m. from the Cade chapel with burial in the Cade Cemetery. The rites were conducted by Rev. Russell Lovell and Rev. Leonard Lee, Baptist ministers.

Birdston Masonic lodge of which he was a member had charge of the graveside rites.

Surviving are his wife Addie Coleman, Houston; two sons, Harry Coleman, Old Ocean, and Frank S. Coleman, Pasadena; three grandchildren, and a brother, James A. Coleman, Streetman, and other relatives.

Pallbearers were Cooper Harris, H. A. Burleson, Ralph Sims, Granville Tisdale, Pruitt Pillans and R. C.Cooper.

Griffin directed.

Notes:

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F. S. COLEMAN DIES FRIDAY

Francis S. Coleman, 63, carpenter, died in Houston Friday morning.

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Addie Coleman, Houston; two sons, Harry Coleman, Old Ocean, and Frank S. Coleman, Pasadena; three grandchildren and a brother, James A. Coleman, Streetman, and other relatives.

Funeral arrangements had not been announced here early Saturday afternoon but will be handled by the Griffin Funeral Home. Burial will be at Cade.

Notes:


Mary Alice (Renfro) Taylor
Dec 7, 1893 - Dec 2, 1989

Mary Taylor

Mrs. Mary Alice Taylor, 96, died Dec. 2, 1989, at a local nursing home.

Services will be 2 p.m. Sunday at Corley Funeral Chapel. Burial will be at the Dawson Funeral Chapel. Burial will be at the Dawson Cemetery. The Rev. Paul S. Thompson will officiate.

She was born Dec. 7. 1893 in Dawson. She was a homemaker and a member of the Dawson United Methodist Church. She was a lifetime resident of Dawson.

Survivors include three sons, Carl S. Taylor and James Taylor, both of Dawson and Lowell Taylor of Corsicana; daughter, Jean McBee of Houston; nine grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandson and a number of nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her husband James U. Taylor and a daughter, Althea Turner.

Nephews will serve as pallbearers.

Notes:


Dewey Renfro
May 11, 1898 - Feb 16, 1970

Dewey Renfro Dies at Dawson

DAWSON (Spl)—Dewey Renfro, 71, retired Dawson farmer and rancher, died early Monday in Memorial Hospital in Corsicana.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday at 3 p.m. at the First Methodist Church here with the Rev. Gilbert Ferrell, the Rev. Roy Davis and the Rev. Ernest Hewitt officiating. Burial will be in the Dawson Cemetery.

He is survived by his wife of Dawson; two sons, Charles M. Renfro, Dawson, and Billy Joe Renfro, Houston; six grandchildren; one sister, Mrs. Alice Taylor, Dawson; and one brother, Almer Renfro, Dawson.

Pallbearers will be James Taylor, Carl Steen Taylor, Lowell Taylor, Morris Renfro, A. J. Renfro, Charles Renfro, Rufus Renfro and Ted Hull.

Notes:


James Aude “Audie” Washburn
Nov 7, 1883 - Dec 24, 1934

EXAMINING TRIAL FOR JIM GARRISON SET FOR THURSDAY

AUD WASHBURN SHOT AND INSTANTLY KILLED AT WILDCAT FERRY

Examining trial for Jim Garrison, 60, farmer, resident of the southeastern section of Navarro of Navarro county, on a formal complaint for murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, 51, near Wildcat Ferry, Monday, is scheduled before Judge T. A. Crowley, Kerens justice of the peace, sometime Thursday, Cleo G. Miller, criminal district attorney, announced Wednesday morning. Judge Crowley announced the examining trial would be held as soon as the witnesses could be procured.

The formal complaint was filed before Judge Crowley by A. H. Holloway, Kerens constable.

Garrison, was arrested by R. A. McCarter, special Texas ranger, and was turned over to county authorities and was placed in the county jail. He still was in jail Wednesday.

Sheriff Rufus Pevehouse said the slaying occurred at the home of Garrison. Officers said a shotgun charge took effect in Washburn’s chest.

Conflicting stories which could not be verified were heard in Corsicana and Kerens relative to incidents immediately preceding the trouble.

Funeral services for Washburn were held at Kerens Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with burial in the Kerens cemetery. Surviving are two brothers, Charley and Bert Washburn, both of the Kerens community; and a sister, Mrs. E. J. Gilbert, Wortham.

Notes:


 

COURTHOUSE NEWS
Criminal District Attorney’s Office

Mr. Miles, one of the state witnesses in the case against Jim Garrison, charged with murder, died near Wildcat Ferry Thursday, John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, stated Friday.

Garrison is charged with murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn near Wildcat Ferry several days ago.

Notes:



Habeas Corpus Filed on Friday For Garrison

A writ of habeas corpus was Friday morning for J. W. (Jim) Garrison by his attorney, A. P. Mays, and District Judge J. S. Callicutt set hearing for Thursday, January 17.

Garrison was indicted for murder by the grand jury Thursday in connection with the fatal shooting of Aube Washburn near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, and had been remanded to jail without bail by Justice T. A. Crowley of Kerens at the conclusion of an examining hearing conducted several days ago.

Notes:



COURTHOUSE NEWS.
District court.
The habeas corpus proceedings hearing for Jim Garrison scheduled for Thursday has been postponed until Saturday. John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, stated Thursday.

Garrison is in jail on an indictment for murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aube Washburn near Rural Shade several weeks ago. He was remanded to jail without bail and the habeas corpus proceedings were instituted by A. P. Mays, defense attorney.

Notes:



HABEAS CORPUS PROCEEDINGS IN DISTRICT COURT

A habeas corpus proceedings hearing was in progress in the thirteenth judicial district court before District Judge J. S. Callicutt, Thursday, on behalf of Jim Garrison, charged by indictment with murder, in connection with the fatal shooting of Aube Washburn, 51, Dec. 24, 1934, at the home of Garrison near Wildcat Ferry, in the extreme southeastern corner of Navarro county.

Garrison has been held in the county jail without bail since his arrest shortly after the shooting of Washburn. At the conclusion of an examining trial before Justice of the Peace T. A. Crowley of the Kerens precinct, Garrison was remanded to jail without bail.

Garrison is represented by A. P. Mays while the state is being represented by John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, and Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor.

Several witnesses testified at the morning session Thursday and attorneys indicated that from the list of witnesses scheduled to be heard, it was likely that the hearing would not be completed until sometime late Friday or Saturday.

Both men resided in the same community.

Notes:



GARRISON ALLOWED BAIL IN SUM $5,000 ON MURDER CHARGE

IS CHARGED WITH KILLING OF AUDE WASHBURN IN EASTERN PART COUNTY

Jim Garrison, charged with murder, was allowed bail in the sum of $5,000 late Thursday afternoon by J. S. Callicutt, judge of the Thirteenth judicial district court, after a day’s testimony had been introduced in a habeas corpus proceeding brought to force the granting of bail. It was agreed by the state and defense attorneys that the testimony of another witness could be taken at a later time and was heard Friday morning.

Garrison was remanded to jail without bail by Justice T. A. Crowley after an examining trial hearing. Garrison was later indicted by the Navarro county grand jury on a murder charge in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, Dec. 24, 1934, at the home of Garrison, in the extreme southeastern portion of the county.

A large number of witnesses were heard Thursday in the habeas corpus proceeding. The hearing had been scheduled for several different times, but had been postponed on account of trials of suits in court, and whether conditions which interfered with the witness reaching Corsicana.

The state represented by John P. Curington, criminal district attorney Chris L. Knox, assistant criminal district attorney; and Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor, formerly criminal district attorney. The defense is represented by Mays and Mays.

Notes:

 

COURTHOUSE NEWS.
Sheriff’s Office.

Jim Garrison was released on bond in the sum of $5,000 from the Navarro county jail Friday night. This amount of bond was set by District Judge J. S. Callicutt during a habeas corpus proceeding after Garrison had been remanded to jail without bail on a murder charge in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, December 24, 1934. The habeas corpus hearing was conducted Thursday and Friday in the district court.

Notes:



COURTHOUSE NEWS.
District Court.
The jury for the week was excused Wednesday morning until Thursday morning at 10 o’clock when attorneys in a pending civil matter decided to present the case before Judge J. S. Callicutt.
An affidavit for contempt of court proceedings was filed Wednesday morning against Jim Garrison for alleged violation of an injunction granted in the case of Mandie Garrison vs. Jim Garrison, divorce and injunction, restraining and enjoining the defendant from disposing of personal property. Judge Callicutt set the hearing down for Saturday, Feb. 9.

Garrison is at liberty on bond in the sum of $5,000 following a habeas corpus hearing last week on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. the case is set for trial in the district court Wednesday, Feb. 13.

A special venire for service in the Garrison case and another special venire in the case of the State of Texas vs. Selma Burnett, murder, will be drawn by District Judge Callicutt, Thursday, it was stated Wednesday.

Burnett faces an indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Hugh Griffin at Blooming Grove, May 21, 1932. Burnett’s case is set for trial Wednesday February 6.

Notes:



JIM GARRISON ON TRIAL IN DISTRICT COURT FOR MURDER

PROSECUTION MOTION FOR CONTINUANCE OVERRULED BY SPECIAL JUDGE

The trial of Jim Garrison charged by indictment with murder, got under way in the Thirteenth Judicial district court Wednesday afternoon before Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett.

Garrison is charged by indictment with murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn near Wildcat Ferry, in the extreme southeastern corner of Navarro county, Dec. 24, 1934.

John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, called a list of the witnesses and made a formal motion for continuance due to the absence of a number of witnesses including one woman who is reported in West Texas. the motion was denied by the Court. The request for a list of state witnesses by Defense Attorney A. P. Mays, was complied with.

The regular jury for the week and the special venire of approximately 75 prospective jurors were ordered to report back at 1:30 o’clock by Judge Lovett.

The state is being represented by District Attorney Curington and Special Prosecutor Cleo G. Miller, former criminal district attorney, while the defendant is being represented by the firm of Mays and Mays.

The defendant recently was released on bond in the sum of $5,000 following a habeas corpus proceeding brought before District Judge J. S. Callicutt.

Notes:



ACQUITTAL MOTION IS OVERRULED TODAY IN GARRISON CASE

STATE RESTS AND DEFENSE TESTIMONY UNDER WAY IN MURDER TRIAL

A defense motion for an instructed verdict of acquittal was overruled by Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett shortly before noon Friday after the state had rested and defense testimony started at 1:30 p.m. in the trial of Jim Garrison on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, 51, at Garrison’s home near Trinity River, in the Wildcat Ferry community, Dec. 24, last.

Six witness were heard for the state at the Friday morning session of court. Those appearing on the witness stand included Chester Ray, Kerens undertaker; A. H. Holloway, Kerens Constable; Earl Bruner, L. M. Henderson and Jim Rowe. The shirt alleged to have been worn at the time by the deceased, a shotgun and two shotgun shells were introduced in evidence.

The introduction of testimony was punctuated to objections by attorneys and the trial is being contested at many stages of testimony.

The trial is attracting considerable attention and all available seats in the courtroom and balconies are filled with interested spectators while scores are standing in the aisles and about the walls of the courtroom.

Argue Defense motion.
The jury was excluded from the room while the arguments of the attorneys on the defense motion for an instructed verdict of not guilty were heard. The defense maintained the state had failed to show that the defendant was guilty and that the state also had proven if Garrison had slain Washburn, it was justifiable; that by the state’s own testimony it had proven Garrison shot a hi-jacker in self-defense;; and further that the state had not established a motive or intent to kill Washburn.

The state attorneys pointed out that Aude Washburn and Jim Garrison had been together a short time before the slaying; that later Washburn’s body was found in Garrison’s home; that the defendant had stated prior to his arrest that he had killed a man in his house and that Washburn’s lifeless body was found in the house; and that witnesses had denied the defense contention that a hi-jacker with a knife and wearing a mask had been reported by the defendant.

Chester Ray, Kerens undertaker, was the first witness Friday morning. He testified he had been called to Garrison’s home and found the body of Aude Washburn about 3:15 o’clock on the afternoon of Dec. 24, 1934. He said the body was lying on the floor in Garrison’s house, a one-room building on the Corsicana Wildcat Ferry road, with the head within two inches of the stove. He described the furniture, etc. in the building. He testified he did not make an examination of the body until he had it taken to the undertaking parlors in Kerens. Ray testified a double-barreled shotgun was lying on the bed.

Described Wound.
The witness described a wound in the right chest below the collarbone but did not probe in the wound or hold a post mortem examination. He said it appeared to be a gunshot wound and not made by a pistol. He said he did not find any knives or other weapons on the body and there was no appearance of disorder in the house. The undertaker said he found food in the mouth of Aude Washburn.

Under re-direct testimony, Ray said Garrison resided in a “shot-gun” tenant house on the farm of Will Kerr within a few hundred yards of Trinity river.

Under re-direct testimony, Ray said a shotgun exhibited by state attorneys, looked like the one he saw at the Garrison’s home.

The motion of Defense Attorney A. P. Mays to exclude the introduction of the shirt in evidence as prejudicial was over ruled by Judge Lovett.

Justice of Peace Is Witness.
T. A. Crowley, justice of the peace, at Kerens for the past six years, was the second witness and the defense attempted to disqualify him as he had brought the clothes of Washburn into the courtroom while another witness was on the stand in what defense Attorney Mays contended was in violation of the rule of witnesses. Judge Crowley said he brought the clothes into the courtroom on the order of the sheriff.

The Kerens justice said he held an inquest over the body of Washburn about 3 o’clock. He explained the wound, etc., and said he saw a shotgun standing beside the door. He positively identified the gun exhibited by the state attorneys and said the gun had one empty and one loaded shell in it. He said the left barrel had the empty shell in it.

Under cross-examination, the witness said the gun had been in his (Crowley’s) and the sheriff’s possession since the time of tragedy. He said that he had never known of any previous trouble between Garrison and Washburn.

Tell of Arrest.
A.H. Holloway, Kerens constable said he and Special Texas Ranger R. A. McCarter went to Garrison’s house about 2:30 o’clock. Holloway arrested the defendant and turned him over to McCarter to bring him to jail in Corsicana. He said Judge Crowley arrived about 40 minutes or an hour after he (Holloway) reached Garrison’s house. Holloway related he went to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Reed and found Mrs. Garrison there and then returned to the Garrison residence. Under cross-examination, Holloway said Garrison made no attempt to run away or evade arrest.

Visited Garrison’s Home.
Earl Bruner, farmer who had visited at Garrison’s house a number of times said he was present at the scene of the slaying about 3 o’clock on the afternoon of the alleged slaying. He had hunted with Garrison’s shotgun and said the shotgun presented looked like the same one he had hunted with. He testified the gun was sitting behind a trunk in the corner of the room when he saw it. When he (Bruner) came to Garrison’s place he testified, Garrison was at the house of R. B. Miles, now deceased, across the road from that occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Garrison.

Bruner said he met Garrison and that Garrison talked about hunting, etc., and didn’t say anything about any trouble in his (Bruner’s) hearing until after the officers arrived. He said Garrison did not walk like a drunken man and carried on a sensible conversation, and carried the two Hendersons to his smokehouse to look at his meat.

Under cross-examination, Bruner said he had used Garrison’s gun and squirrel gun and that (Garrison) was a good neighbor. He also said he knew Garrison and Washburn drank liquor.

Tells of Conversation.
L. M. Henderson said he went to the scene of the trouble about 2 or 2:30 o’clock, Dec. 24, 1934, and that he was shown meat and lard in the smokehouse by Garrison. He testified that Garrison told him a man came in on him (Garrison) with a knife after his (Garrison’s) money and that he (Garrison) shot him. He said Garrison told him he didn’t know the man he shot. Henderson said Garrison did not seem alarmed; that Garrison had had a drink or two but talked all right.

Jim Rowe said he found Washburn dead in the house of Garrison. He quoted Garrison as saying to him; “I killed a ------- ------ -------. He tried to rob me”

Could Walk All Right.
He said Garrison was able to talk all right; that he (Rowe) arrived about 1 o’clock Christmas eve afternoon. He testified Garrison told him he (Garrison) had killed a hi-jacker. The witness said he told the defendant that he (Garrison) had killed Aude Washburn, but Garrison replied he had killed a hi-jacker who was after him.

The witness denied anything was said about a mask.

Row testified he saw a jar two-thirds full of what he thought was liquor under a table in the house. He said Washburn was dead and plates were on the table.

Earl Bruner was recalled and said Garrison was married and that his wife was not present when he arrived. The state rested at 11:24 a.m.

Thursday Afternoon Session.
Completion of a jury and the hearing of evidence from three state witnesses, none eye-witnesses to the shooting, was accomplished at Thursday afternoon’s session of court. Garrison entered a plea of “not guilty” when arraigned on an indictment, charging him with murder, in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, Dec. 24, 1934, at his (Garrison’s) home near Wildcat Ferry. The indictment was read by Criminal District Attorney Curington.

Forty veniremen were examined before the jury of twelve was completed. The state exercised six challenges and the defense excused seven while fifteen were excused for cause by Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett.

The three remaining special veniremen and all of the jurors for the week were finally excused by Judge Lovett after the jury was completed.

Defense Attorney A. P. Mays challenged M. G. Deason of Blooming Grove, due to the fact that the jury list carried his name as G. M. Deason, but after the court had overruled the proposal, both state and defense accepted him as the twelfth member of the jury. The jury was completed at 3:25 o’clock Thursday afternoon and the introduction of testimony started a short time after the arraignment.

The rule was demanded and all witnesses, except Bert Washburn of Kerens, brother of the deceased Aude Washburn were ordered excluded from the room.

Brother Is Witness.
Bert Washburn, brother of the slain man, aged, 49, manager of the Texas Power and Light company at Kerens, was the first witness to be called. The examination of the witnesses Thursday afternoon was conducted by Special Prosecutor Cleo G. Miller. Cross-examination was carried on by Defense Counsel A. P. Mays.

Washburn testified that Aude Washburn was 51 years of age and had lived with him (Bert Washburn) for a number of years until the past December when he (Bert Washburn) rented a farm near Wilcat Ferry and sent his brother to the place to be in charge. The far was 41/2 or 5 miles south of Rural Shade, the witness said, and Jim Rowe was staying with the deceased. He said he saw his brother the day prior to the shooting. The witness said he didn’t know the defendant. Under cross-examination, Washburn said his brother, Aude Washburn had never married, and also was a heavy drinker.

Visited Garrison Home.
White West, 35, married, resident of the Rural Shade vicinity, testified that he had known Jim Garrison and Aude Washburn seven years. He said he had visited in Garrison’s home and had had “business dealings with him.” He related he saw the two men on Dec. 24; that as he (West) passed Garrison’s place he saw him (Garrison) in his (Garrison’s) door with a horse saddled in the yard; later saw Garrison riding horseback 200 or 300 yards behind him (West) in the road but didn’t catch up with him. He said he met Washburn in a trailer with two mules hitched to it near the home of Tom Combs, spoke and drove by. He (West) testified that he later looked back, saw Garrison tie his (Garrison’s) horse to the back of Washburn’s trailer and get in the trailer with him (Washburn) and put his arm about Washburn’s neck. He said this occurred about 11 o’clock in the morning, and was about 1 ½ or 2 miles from Garrison’s home.

Cross-Examination.
On cross-examination, the witness admitted that he had taken drinks with Garrison and also stated that Garrison and Washburn were good friends ant that he had never heard of any trouble between them and had never known of any known of any trouble between the two men, and saw no indication of any trouble or ill feeling between the two men as they rode together down the road toward Garrison’s residence.

John Reed, who resided two miles from Wildcat Ferry, former of Rural Shade, said he knew both men and that he was a neighbor of Garrison. He testified he met the two men in the trailer the morning of the shooting in the road within a half mile of Garrison’s home. He said the trio were old friends and talked joked for a time and took two drinks of whiskey from a half-gallon fruit jar. Reed was about 100 yards from his residence and said he laid a number of traps in the trailer while they were talking about “old times” and “what good friends we were.” He said he was told that Washburn was going to Garrison’s home for dinner.

Reed said he did not see any gun in the trailer and also that he did not consider either man drunk.

Under cross-examination, Reed said that Washburn remarked;
“Uncle Jim (Garrison) is the best friend I’ve got in the world.”

Reed said he went home and heard of the shooting within an hour.

The jury was instructed not to read newspapers unless any reference to the trial had been deleted. Court adjourned at 4:37 p.m. until 9:30 a.m. Friday.

The jury in the case is Pete Goodin, Navarro; R. M. Fulton, Blooming Grove; Alex Bryant, Blooming Grove; Wayne Elrod, Drane; Tom Hardan, Pursley; A. J. Chamberlain, Frost; Don Sawyer, Richland; T. C. Dillard, Corsicana; J. M. Harvard, Navarro; A. E. Drain, Emhouse; John Garner, Sr., Corsicana; and M. G. Deason, Blooming Grove.

Notes:



TESTIMONY ENDS IN GARRISON TRAIL AS DEFENSE RESTS CASE

JUDGE ADJOURNS COURT UNTIL MONDAY WHEN CHARGE WILL BE PRESENTED
Testimony in the trial of Jim Garrison, 62, on trial in the Thirteenth judicial district court on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934, was abruptly ended early Saturday afternoon with the unexpected announcement from Defense Counsel A. P. Mays that the defense rested and would not put on additional witnesses. The morning session of court had been used in rebuttal testimony was expected at the afternoon sessions.

Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett adjourned court until Monday morning at 9:30 o’clock at which time he will present his charge to the jury and the arguments of attorneys is expected to follow immediately. The court announced that an addition to the regular charge, he would include D. Ts and alcoholic hallucinosis was insanity, that drunkenness was no defense for crime, and also would charge on exculpatory statements and self defense.

Seven state rebuttal witnesses were used Saturday morning, five saying Garrison’s reputation as a peaceful, law-abiding citizen was bad and the other two testified they had known Garrison for years but couldn’t testify about his reputation.

The courtroom was filled to capacity an hour before the afternoon session started and many did not go for lunches for fear that would lose their vantage seats for the afternoon court procedure.

It was elicited from the state witnesses by defense counsel that the defendant drank liquor, had engaged in several personal difficulties, but none of their own knowledge knew whether the defendant was justified or not.

The defense attempted to keep the state from introducing testimony on the general reputation of the defendant due to the fact that the state had not brought this phase out in direct examination before resting the case the first time. The motion was overruled by the Court and the jury was brought back into the courtroom.

Witnesses Testifying.
Those testifying Saturday morning included L. M. Henderson, J. R. Bruner, D. E. Morton, Dick Holloman, R. B. Blissett, Tom Collins and Judge T. A. Crowley (re-called). Holloman and Blissett testified they had known the defendant for a number of years but did not know his general reputation.

Judge Crowley admitted under cross-examination that he was friendly to the prosecution and said he had fined Garrison on an assault case several years ago after the case had been transcripted to the district court and returned. He admitted he had heard of trouble in which Garrison was involved including a fight and cutting scrape but no complaints or arrests were made out of his court in these connections.

Knew Garrison 25 years.
Collins testified he had known Garrison for 25 years and that Garrison had been in trouble and that his reputation was bad before Garrison went to Rural Shade. He admitted that he (Collins) was a close friend to the Washburn Brothers.

Morton said he had heard Garrisons reputation discussed before the shooting and heard of threats made by the defendant, but had never heard him carrying out threats.

Henderson testified that he had seen Garrison about his gin at Rural Shade when he was not drinking.

After five witnesses had testified, Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor, announced the state would rest with provision additional character witnesses be allowed to be heard later. The defense declined to agree to this proposal and the trail was halted for about a half hour.

Courtroom Crowded.
The courtroom was filled with interested spectators at Saturday morning’s session, but the aisles and balconies were not jammed as Friday afternoon.

Defense Counsel A. P. Mays said shortly before noon that the completion of testimony would be accomplished during the afternoon. It is highly probable, according to attaches of the court, that the charge of the judge will be prepared during the week-end and arguments of the attorneys given probably Monday afternoon, with the case likely not to be given the jury before late Monday or Tuesday morning.

Friday Afternoon’s Session.
Jim Garrison, the defendant, testified Friday afternoon on his own behalf and remained on the stand for one hour and 30 minutes. He related incidents and occurrences of the morning prior to the shooting of Washburn, and declared that he did not shoot Washburn, but shot at a masked man advancing on him with a knife in his hand who failed to heed his command to stop. Four local physicians testified relative to “D.T.’s” and alcoholic disturbances caused by excessive use of liquor.

The defense rested shortly before the court recessed Friday afternoon. The jury was excluded on several occasions while opposing counsel argued various points of evidence and procedure.

Garrison said he had never been convicted of a felony, was a native of Arkansas, but had resided in Texas since 1882. Most of the time since then having been spent in Navarro county. He said he resided in the Wildcat Ferry community for the past 12 years.

Regular Liquor User.
The defendant said he had been a regular liquor drinker for the last 15 or 16 years and for a year prior to Christmas Eve Day, 1934, had drunk more or less every day—from one-half pint to a quart of home-made whiskey.

Garrison said for a week or ten days prior to the time of the shooting, he had been unable to rest at night, had no appetite. He recounted trouble with a man named Hardin and that at night he thought he could see Hardin’s face, and hear him talking outside of his window. He also said at times he imagined he was being poisoned, and saw snakes in his home.

The Witness testified that he had known Washburn for 8 or 9 years and that he (Washburn) was as good a friend as he (Garrison) had ever had—they had never had any trouble or “falling out.”

“I had no reason or intent to kill Washburn,’” Garrison said.

The defendant testified he arose on the morning of December 24, fed his mules, drank a cup of coffee and saddled his horse. He said his enemy, Hardin, passed his house in a car going toward Rural Shade and about an hour later he (Garrison) went to the home of Charley Combs, saw a sick child, and then went to Tom Comb’s place where he met Aude Washburn. He said he procured a quart of whiskey and that the deceased had a half gallon of liquor. He tied his horse to the back of the trailer occupied by Washburn and then climbed into the trailer with his friend and they took two drinks. He said Washburn decided to accompany him home to discuss a mule trade and en route met John Reed, an old acquaintance, and the trio took a couple of drinks. Garrison said he couldn’t remember the conversations between the three friends, but there was no trouble of any kind. He said after he and Washburn reached his (Garrison’s) house, they fixed them a toddy and looked at the mules. Garrison said Washburn remarked to him that he (Washburn) was going home and have Jim Rowe stop work as it was so near Christmas and that Washburn drove off.

Garrison said he returned to his house and made himself another toddy and picked up his shotgun and was preparing to go out and shoot crows when a man with a rag over his face and a knife in his hand came into the door.

Says Didn’t Kill Washburn.
The defendant said he thought the man was either a robber or Hardin. He said if he killed Washburn, he didn’t know it. He said he had no reason to kill Washburn and thought that Washburn had gone home. He said as soon as he fired at the man in the middle of his house, he (Garrison) went out of the back door and “reckoned” he went to Miles. He said he remembered talking to Jim Rowe at Miles’ place, across the road, but did not recall talking to L. M. Henderson or showing him his meat and lard in his (Garrison’s) smokehouse. He said his arrest by Constable A. H. Holloway seemed like a dream.

Garrison testified that in October, 1934, he was hit in the head with a clevis or singletree. He said he stayed in jail a month and four days after his arrest and since that time had been with his sister, Mrs. Will Robinson. He said he had not taken a drink of liquor since Christmas and didn’t ever expect to again.

The defendant was subjected to grueling cross-examination at the hand of John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, after the direct examination had been concluded by Defense Attorney A. P. Mays.

Attorneys Check Memory.
The district attorney queried him about his memory about his business transactions, the about of money made in previous years, the number of bales of cotton produced, etc. The witness said he couldn’t tell the amount of his income last year, but he thought he made about nine bales of cotton.

The witness admitted that he had trouble with Hardin at his (Garrison’s) place about one and one-half years ago.

“You cut him all to pieces didn’t you?” the district attorney queried. Defense objections ensued and the jury was excluded as the attorneys argued the admissability of the evidence and the court ruled the evidence and question not admissable as no indictments had been returned.

He was grilled relative to his statements about seeing the face of Harden at his (Garrison’s) window at nights. He was unable to tell the number of times, how he was dressed, etc., and admitted that the face at the window did not try to harm him.

Garrison admitted that Hardin did not say anything to him or try to harm him when he passed that morning in a car.

When District Attorney Curington asked the defendant if the delusions had stopped after he (Garrison) had killed Washburn, the witness declared;
“I didn’t kill Aude Washburn.”

Says Not Crazy Now.
Garrison said he was not crazy now and under questioning of the district attorney recounted the meeting of Washburn at the Comb’s residence and their trip to Garrison’s home, reaching his home about 10:30 or 11 a.m. He said that Washburn left about 11 a.m. and had been gone 25 or 30 minutes before the shooting.

Recounting the events of the time of the shooting, the defendant said his assailant had a handkerchief or mask over face and a knife in his hand. He was sitting by the stove when the man appeared in the door, Garrison said, fixing to go shoot crows. He said he couldn’t say what kind of handkerchief it was except it was white.

Garrison said he shot the man as he (the man) was about in the middle of the room, but didn’t know where he fell and was not sure he had killed him. He said he didn’t know which barrel he discharged.

The witness said he “sorter came to myself and I was over at Miles.” He said he knew he had shot somebody. He remembered Rowe coming over and that he (Garrison) told him he had shot a hi-jacker. He said Jim Rowe said it was Aude Washburn, and that he (Garrison) told Rose he (Garrison) would not harm Aude. He did not remember talking to Henderson.

Garrison testified he was drunk but could walk all right.

Under re-direct examination by A. P. Mays, Garrison said he resided about 300 yards from Trinity river, and also testified that he could get all of the liquor he (Garrison) wanted without paying for it.

Doctors On Stand.
Drs. Dubart Miller, Will Miller, T. O. Wills and J. Wilson David, all of Corsicana, were called as defense witnesses. Attorney Mays outlined incidents surrounding and prior to the tragedy and asked questions relative to “D. T.’s” and alcoholic hallucinosis, etc., and they testified that a person thus affected would not know right from wrong.

Under cross-examination by Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor, the physicians said that this condition was usually lasting from one day to a much longer period. Dr. Dubart Miller said he had never heard of a man with “D.T.s” and it affecting him only 30 minutes and should a person be affected, should show signs all day and couldn’t suddenly contract the disease.

The physicians said persons often could recollect events and happenings during their illness. All said they had not examined Garrison and did not know him personally.

Dr. Opie Wills said at times a person so affected would act like a normal person, and under cross-examination, said he had never seen a person have “D.T.s” two hours and never have another trace of it.

Dr, Will Miller testified there was no way to tell the duration of the affeciation but that it generally did not come on a moments notice and leave the same way. He said usually the general system of the patient had broken down.

Dr. J. Wilson David said a person could have alcoholic hallucinosis for a short time and differentiated between “D.T.s” and the alcoholic hallucinosis, although they are closely related.

Variance in Diseases.
He said that “D.T.s” last for some time but that acute alcoholic hallucinosis could result and within an hour be gone—that it would vary on the individual, as the amount of liquor necessary to cause intoxication varies with individuals, etc.

Mrs. Will Robinson, sister of the defendant, testified she owned 900 acres of land in Navarro county.

The question asked her by Attorney A. P. Mays whether she would give the defendant a home the remainder of his life and look after him if he was acquitted was objected to by the state and Judge Lovett sustained the objection. At this point the witness was excused and court was adjourned until Saturday morning.

Standing room was a premium for a considerable time before the Friday afternoon sessions got under way and difficulty was experienced in getting witness through the press of the crowds in the aisles and in all available places in the courtroom. The judge was forced several times to order spectators from crowding too closely to the jury box.

Notes:



TRIAL INTERRUPTED BY DEATH DAUGHTER OF ONE JURY MEMBER

NOT KNOWN MONDAY MORNING WHEN REUMPTION OF CASE ANTICIPATED
The trial of Jim Garrison on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat “Ferry, December 24, 1934, was interrupted Monday morning when Miss Turner Mae Garner, teacher in the Corsciana public schools, daughter of John T. Garner, was taken suddenly ill and died within a few hours. Mr. Garner is one of the twelve men on the jury trying Garrison and was allowed to go to the hospital and later to his home in company with Jack Floyd, deputy sheriff. The remaining eleven members of the jury are locked up at the courthouse.

Testimony Completed.
Testimony was completed Saturday and Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett had his charge ready to present to the jury and start the arguments of the attorneys Monday morning. The courtroom again was filled with interested spectators.

Judge Lovett and attorneys in the case perused the statutes carefully in an effort to find a law whereby the juror could be released, but under the statutes, should the juror be discharged, the defendant would stand acquitted under “former jeopardy” law.

When Mr. Garner’s daughter was stricken, Judge Lovett, with agreement of counsel, Richard and A. P. Mays, allowed the juror to go to her bedside with Deputy Sheriff Floyd at an early hour Monday morning. Judge Lovett quoted the following statutes:
Law is Quoted.
Article 623, Revised Criminal Statutes, Texas, 1925: “Jurors shall not separate. The court may adjourn veniremen to any day of term; but when jurors have been sworn in a case, those so sworn shall be kept together and not permitted to separate until a verdict has been rendered or the jury finally discharged, unless by permission of the court, with the consent of each party and in charge of an officer.”

Judge Lovett Monday afternoon announced that the trial would be resumed Wednesday morning and instructed the eleven jurors to remain in the custody of the sheriff, warned them not to discuss the case among themselves or allow anyone to discuss the case with them.

Notes:



Courthouse News
District Court.
Non-jury matters were scheduled to be heard in the district court Tuesday.

The trial of Jim Garrison on a murder indictment as a result of the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn near Wildcat Ferry, December 24, 1934 is scheduled to be resumed in the district court Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock with the delivery of Judge Norris W. Lovett’s charge. Arguments of the attorneys will start after the delivery of the court’s charge to the jury.

Notes:

 


ARGUMENTS STARTED IN GARRISON CASE ON WEDNESDAY MORNING

COURTROOM BEEN CROWDED WITH SPECTATORS THROUGHOUT TRIAL

Arguments of attorneys to the jury in the trial of Jim Garrison, 62, on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, 51, near Wildcat Ferry, in the extreme southeastern section of Navarro county, Dec. 24, 1934, got under way in the Thirteen judicial district court Wednesday morning at 10:15 o’clock following the reading of the charge to the jury by Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett.

Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor, and former criminal district attorney, opened the arguments for the state. He was followed by Richard Mays, defense. A. P. Mays finished for the defense while John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, will close for the state this afternoon.

Much Interest in Case.
Interest in the case was still maintained and standing room was at a premium Wednesday morning as has been the case since the trial opened a week ago.

Garrison entered a plea of not guilty when arraigned last Wednesday and the trial has been bitterly contested throughout.

The trial was interrupted Monday morning when Miss Turner Mae Garner, Corsicana public school teacher, daughter of John T. Garner, one of the jurors, was stricken and died. By agreement, the juror, with Deputy Sheriff Jack Floyd accompanying him was allowed to go to his home and returned to the jury late Tuesday following the funeral rites.

Testimony was concluded Saturday afternoon.

Judge Delivers Charge.
Included in the charge delivered to the jury by Judge Lovett were definitions of murder, with and without malice, self defense, delirium tremens, acute alcoholic hallucinosis, ect., giving the penalties prescribed by law in event of conviction, and also dealing with the application for suspended sentence in the event of conviction.

The charge included several verdict forms for use after decision had been reached.

The charge defined murder with malice as the wrongful act done intentional without cause or excuse. Punishment of murder with malice is by death, life imprisonment or any term of years not less than two. The penalty for conviction of murder without malice is from two to five years.

Insanity Defined.
It was brought out in the charge that temporary insanity, delirium tremens, acute alcoholic hallucinosis were kinds of insanity recognized by law and that a person must be of sound memory and discretion before they can be punished for crime.

The charge also contained a provision setting forth that intoxication or temporary insanity of mind, produced by voluntary recent use of ardent spirits, is not an excuse.

The jurors were instructed that a person was presumed to be innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, and also defined self defense and the condition of a defendant’s mind at the time of the shooting as to whether he thought his life was in danger from an armed hi-jacker.

The twelve men were also in instructed that the indictment against Jim Garrison or his motion for a suspended sentence if convicted was no evidence of guilt and was not to be thus considered.

Notes:



GARRISON IS FOUND GUILTY; PUNISHMENT ASSESSED 10 YEARS

DEFENSE ATTORNEYS EXPECTED TO FILE MOTION FOR NEW TRIAL

After deliberating slightly more than one hour and thirty minutes Wednesday afternoon, the jury in the trial of Jim Garrison, 62, on a murder indictment for the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, 51, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934, returned a verdict of guilty and assessed his punishment at confinement in the penitentiary for ten years. Notice of appeal was immediately given by A. P. Mays, defense attorney.

Conclusion of arguments of the attorneys was made about 4 o’clock Wednesday afternoon and the jury returned its verdict shortly after 5:30 o’clock.

New Trial Motion Expected.
A formal motion for a new trial is expected to be filed immediately before Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett, by the defense.

After Washburn was shot with a shotgun in the right chest in the house of Garrison, a short distance from Trinity river, in the extreme southeastern portion of the county. Garrison entered a plea of not guilty when arraigned on the indictment last week and testified he shot at a person he thought to be a hi-jacker, advancing on him with a knife and
masked. He denied shooting Aude Washburn his (Garrison’s) friend for many years.

Testimony was completed Saturday but the presentation of the charge of the Court and attorney’s arguments were postponed until Wednesday morning when Miss Turner Mae Garner, daughter of John T. Garner, a juror, was taken suddenly ill and died early Monday morning.

Arguments Wednesday.
Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor and former criminal district attorney, opened the arguments for the state Wednesday morning and was followed by Richard Mays, defense counsel. A. P. Mays spoke for the defense at the Wednesday afternoon session with John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, closing for the prosecution.

The entire trial over a period of a week attracted unusual attention and the courtroom was packed with interested spectators throughout with scores unable to procure seats at a number of the sessions. A large crowd remained in the courtroom until the jury returned its verdict.

Notes:

 


Formal Motion For New Trial Filed Friday

A formal motion for a new trial of J. W. (Jim) Garrison was filed in the district clerk’s office Friday by Defense Attorneys Richard and A. P. Mays.

The motion is of fourteen pages containing forty different objections and attacks on the Court’s charge, conduct of state attorneys, jurors, etc.

Garrison was convicted by a jury Wednesday afternoon and given ten years in the penitentiary for the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry Dec. 24, 1934. Garrison entered a plea of not guilty when arraigned.

The case was tried before Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett. A definite time for the hearing of the motion for a new trial had not been determined early Friday afternoon.

Notes:



Courthouse News.
District Court.
The defendant’s motion for a new trial in the case of the State of Texas vs. Jim Garrison, is scheduled to be heard Monday morning at 10 o’clock. All members of the jury have been summoned to appear at that time.

Garrison was found guilty by the jury for the murder of Aude Washburn last Wednesday and assessed his punishment at 10 years in the penitentiary. A motion for a new trial was filed Friday and in the event the motion is overruled, it has been intimated that the case will be appealed to the court of criminal appeals at Austin.

Notes:



MOTION FOR NEW GARRISON TRIAL IS ARGUED ON MONDAY

MAN CONVICTED FOR SLAYING AUDE WASHBURN SEEKS NEW HEARING

A motion for a new trial for Jim Garrison, 62, was being heard in the Thirteenth judicial district court, Monday before two judges—Norris W. Lovett, special judge who presided during the trial and J. S. Callicutt, regular judge.

Garrison was convicted last Wednesday by a jury and was given ten years in the penitentiary in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, 51, near Wildcat Ferry in the extreme southeastern corner of Navarro county, Dec. 24, 1934.

The formal motion, attacking the charge of the court, admission of certain evidence, arguments of the state attorneys, John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, and Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor, conduct of the jury, etc. was presented Monday morning, covering 14 pages and in 40 sections. The defense attorneys are Richard and A. P. Mays.

The 12 men who constituted the jury in the trial of Garrison, were on hand after being summoned as witnesses in the motion for a new trial.

Court attaches stated it was probable the hearing would not be completed until late Monday afternoon.

Notes:



GARRISON RELEASED ON $5000 BOND FOR RULING ON APPEAL

Jim Garrison was released on bond in the sum of $5,000 to await the result of the appeal of his case to the Court of Criminal Appeals, Austin, Tuesday morning after he was sentenced to the penitentiary for not less than two nor more than ten years by Special District Judge Norris w. Lovett.

Garrison was convicted by a jury last week and given ten years on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. Sentence was pronounced by Judge Lovett Tuesday morning when the order over-ruling the defendant’s motion for a new trial was formally entered after the hearing was held Monday with Judge Lovett and District Judge J. S. Callicutt hearing the motions.

Sureties on the bond of $5,000 were Robert Witherspoon and Mrs. Jane Robinson.

Notes:



COURTHOUSE NEWS.
Court Proceedings.
AUSTIN, June 12.—(AP)—Proceeding today in the court of criminal appeals;
Submitted on brief and oral argument---J. E. Elig from Anderson; J. W. Howell from Randall; Jim Garrison from Navarro.

Notes:



COURTHOUSE NEWS.
District Court.
The Court of Criminal Appeals, Austin, Wednesday reversed and remanded the case of Jim Garrison from Navarro county according to copies of the opinion of the court received Thursday by District Judge J. S. Callicutt and attorneys. The verdict was reversed and remanded, according to the opinion, for the arguments of state’s attorney (John R. Curington) and also for the exhibiting of the bloody shirt of Aude Washburn for whose death Garrison was tried. The opinion also said the trial court (Norris Lovett) erred in not charging the jury that the jury was the sole judges of the facts proven, credibility of witnesses and weight given of testimony.

Garrison was convicted and sentenced to 10 years in the penitentiary early this year on murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn at Garrison’s home, near Wildcat Ferry, southeast Navarro county, Dec. 24, 1924.

Mays and Mays were defense attorneys and appealed the case after a motion for a new trial was denied by Judge Lovett.

Notes:



Courthouse News.
District Court.
A special venire of 50 prospective jurors for service in three murder trials has been selected for Thursday. The venire is in the cases of Hampton Kerr, negro, charged with murder; Jim Garrison, indicted for murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aube Washburn in the Southeastern section of Navarro county, December 24, 1934, and the case of Albert Meritt, indicted for murder in connection with the death several weeks ago of Elmer Kitchens, state highway maintenance department employee, after having been struck by a truck on Highway 14 between Richland and Currie.

Notes:

 


Courthouse News.
District Court.
All witnesses in the cases of Jim Garrison and Clifton Dunnings, charged by indictments for murder, set for trial Wednesday were excused until further notified Thursday morning by District Judge Wayne R. Howell as the case of Ben Widener, murder went to trial Thursday morning.

Notes:



Courthouse News.
District Court.
The case of the State of Texas vs. Jim Garrison, charged with murder, was postponed Monday morning until Monday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock by Judge Wayne R. Howell, when a motion for a continuance was presented, due to the illness of the defendant.

Garrison was indicted in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry Dec. 24, 1934. He was tried and convicted here and assessed a term of ten years in the penitentiary but the case was reversed and remanded by the court of criminal appeals.

Notes:



Courthouse News.
District Court.
District Judge Wayne R. Howell Monday afternoon granted a defense motion for a continuance in the case of Jim Garrison after Dr. S. H. Burnett, county health officer, testified he was physically unable to stand trial.

Notes:



Courthouse News.
District Court.
Special venires of 50 prespective jurors were being summoned Tuesday for Dec. 13 for the cases of Ruf Tickle and Jim Garrison both murder charges.

Notes:



Courthouse news.
District court.
Trial of Jim Garrison got under way in the Thirteenth judicial district court Monday morning. He is under indictment for murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. At a previous trial Garrison was found guilty and was assessed 10 years in the penitentiary. The verdict, however, was reversed and remanded on appeal by the Court of Criminal Appeals, Austin.

The state is being represented by Cleo G. Miller, criminal district attorney, and J. C. Jacobs assistant. The defendant is being represented by Mays and Mays. Attorneys said the defendant would plea not guilty when arraigned. A special venire of 36 men in addition to the regular jury panel was summoned in the case. Selection of a jury was in progress at the noon recess.

Notes:



Courthouse News.
District Court.
The trial of Jim Garrison on murder indictment was in progress in the district court Tuesday. He is being tried in the connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. The defendant entered a plea of not guilty when arraigned on the indictment Monday afternoon.

Garrison was convicted and given ten years on a previous trial but the verdict was set aside when the Court of Criminal Appeals reversed and remanded the case.

The jury trying the case is composed of T. H. Bowden, Rice; W. S. Harlan, Richland; Rush Green, Rice; J. H. Magness, Wortham; J. R. Garner, Chatfield; J. R. Shipman, Purdon; F. F. Blair, Chatfield; Will M. Burns, Purdon; H. D. Fall, Dawson; Frnak Seeley, Emhouse; Jim B. Collin, Emhouse; S. H. Allen, Emhouse.

The defense and state exercised 10 challenges each while five were excused for cause.

C. P. Ray of Austin, formerly an undertaker at Kerens, was the only witness used Monday afternoon after the jury was completed.

Witnesses testifying Tuesday morning were Bert Washburn, brother of the deceased; Mrs. White West, Andrews, Texas, formerly of Rural Shade.

The prosecution is being handled by Cleo G. Miller, criminal district attorney, and J. C. Jacobs, assistant, Mays and Mays are representing Garrison.

Notes:




Courthouse News.
District Court.
Jim Garrison took the stand in his trial on murder indictment in the district court Wednesday. He is being tried in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. Garrison testified he and Washburn were the best of friends and had never had any trouble.

With reference to the fatal shooting of Washburn, Garrison said Washburn had left his house, according to his memory, and he (Garrison) saw a masked man, armed with a knife advancing on him. Garrison said he believed at the time the man was a person with whom he had experienced previous trouble. He fired one time with a shotgun. The defendant said he didn’t know he had slain Washburn until the next day after he was in the county jail.

Indications were tat evidence will be completed some time Wednesday afternoon.

The state rested Tuesday afternoon.

The defense is relying on temporary insanity, caused by excessive use of alcohol over a long period of time.

The prosecution is being conducted by Cleo G. Miller and J. C. Jacobs, criminal district attorney and assistant, respectively. The defense is being conducted by Mays & Mays.

Notes:



Complete Testimony In Garrison Trial
District Judge Wayne R. Howell Wednesday afternoon was to prepare his charge to the jury in the trial of Jim Garrison, charged with murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, Dec. 24, 1934.

Testimony was completed Wednesday noon, with the exception of that to be given by two physicians Thursday morning. As soon as the charge is prepared and the two physicians testify, arguments of the attorneys will get under way, Cleo G. Miller, criminal district attorney, stated Wednesday afternoon.

Notes:



Courthouse News.
District Court.
The charge of District Judge Wayne R. Howell was in the hands of attorneys in the trial of Jim Garrison Thursday morning and arguments were scheduled to complete during the day.

The case will probably reach the jury late Thursday.

Garrison is being tried in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. He took the stand on his own behalf Wednesday and testified he shot what he believed to be a masked robber, armed with a knife, and did not know until the following day he had killed Washburn.

The defendant received a 10-year sentence on a former trial but the case was reversed and remanded by the Court of Criminal Appeals.

Cleo G. Miller and J. C. Jacobs criminal district attorney and assistant, respectively, conducted the prosecution, while Garrison is represented by Mays and Mays.

Notes:



Courthouse News.
District Court.
The jury in the case of Jim Garrison, murder, returned a verdict of not guilty to District Judge Wayne R. Howell Friday morning after deliberating since Thursday afternoon.

Garrison was tried in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. He plead not guilty when arraigned.

On a previous trial, a verdict of guilty was returned and his punishment was assessed at 10 years in the penitentiary, but the court of criminal appeals reversed and remanded the verdict.

Notes:


George R. Washburn
Oct 9, 1850 - Nov 9, 1931

G. L. WASHBURN, PIONEER RESIDENT OF KERENS, DIES

KERENS, NOV. 10.—(Spl.)—Funeral services for G. L. Washburn age 81, pioneer resident of the Kerens community, were held Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 at the home of his granddaughter, Mr. and Mrs. F. E. McCown, and were conducted by Rev. Joe N. Everhart, Presbyterian minister. Interment was in Jimmerson cemetery, two and one-half miles southwest of Kerens, with Mason in charge of the ceremony at the grave.

Mr. Washburn died at the family home here Mondaynight at 8:30 following an illness of several days.

Surviving are four children, C. E. Washburn, J. A. Washburn, F. B. Washburn, all of Kerens, and Mrs. E. J. Gilbert, Fairfield.

The deceased took an active part in community affairs and always worked for the advancement of not only his community but the county as well. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge here, member of the Commandery at Corsicana and of Hella Temple at Dallas.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Tuesday, Nov 10, 1931
  • (death cert. and census have George R. Washburn) h/o Louisa A. (Bosworth) Washburn married Jan. 6, 1876 Navarro County s/o George Rufus Washburn and Lucretia (Lyde) Washburn
  • Submitted by Diane Richards

Charles E. “Charlie” Washburn
Apr 7, 1882 - Jun 24, 1935

CHARLIE WASHBURN BURIED AT KERENS TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Charlie Washburn died at the home of his brother, Bert Washburn, near Kerens, at 8:30 Monday night following a long illness. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock from the Stockton Funeral Home in Kerens. The services were conducted by Rev. Joe Everheart, pastor of the First Presbyterian church. Burial was in the Kerens cemetery.

He was born and reared in the Kerens community and was well known in Corsicana and other sections of the county as well as at Kerens.

Surviving are one brother, Bert Washburn, Kerens; a sister, Mrs. E. J. Gilbert, Fairfield, and other relatives.

Notes:


Frank Burton “Burt” Washburn
Feb 28, 1886 - Jul 9, 1944

F. BURT WASHBURN OF KERENS BURIED THERE ON MONDAY
KERENS, July 10.—(Special)—Funeral services for F. Burt Washburn age 58, who died at his home Sunday morning at 2:15 were held Monday morning at 11 o’clock at the family residence, 107 South Bonner, with Rev. J. W. Ousley, pastor of the First Baptist church, officiating.

Mr. Washburn was born and reared in Kerens and attended school here. In 1906, he was married to Miss Virgie Smith. He has been connected with the Texas Power and Light company some 20 years and was always willing at any time to give the very best service to the entire community. He was know and liked by a host of friends and well always be remembered for his big heartedness, his cheerful disposition and his many acts of kindness toward his fellowman.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Virgie Washburn; one son, Thomas Burton Washburn of Orange; four daughters, Mrs. I. R. Mitchell, Dallas; Mrs. F. E. McCown, Orange, and Mrs. Charles Bowman, Trinidad; three grandchildren, and one sister, Mrs. Ezra Gilbert, Houston.

Notes:


Charlie Valera (Arnett) McCown
Aug 23, 1907 - Mar 17, 1965

Mrs. McCown Of Kerens Expires, Rites Friday

KERENS, March 18, (Spl.)—Mrs. Hubert (Charlie) McCown, 57, died at her home here Wednesday following a year’s illness.

Funeral services will be held Friday at 2 p.m. from the First Methodist church with burial in the Kerens cemetery.

The rites will be conducted by Rev. J. W. Hodge, pastor of the church; Rev. Don Walker pastor of the First Baptist church, and E. E. Keene, minister of the Kerens Church of Christ.

Mrs. McCown and her husband had operated a florist business here for many years.

Surviving are her husband, a son, Charles McCown, a daughter, Mrs. Billy Ray Brown, all of Kerens, six grandchildren, two brothers , Edwin Arnett, Baytown, and Wayne Arnett, Kingston, Jamaica; two sisters, Mrs. J. T. Neal, Houston, and Mrs. Bert Inmon, Kerens, and a number of other relatives.

Paschal Funeral Home directs.

Notes:


Buney Anthony McCown
May 29, 1902 - Jun 10, 1972

B. A. McCown

KERENS—Funeral services were held at 10 a. m. Monday at the Paschal Funeral Home Chapel for Buney A. McCown, 74, of Kerens who died Saturday at a Bryan hospital after and extended illness.

Burial was in Kerens City Cemetery and Cato Sharrer Church of Christ minister, officiated.

Survivors include his widow, a son, and a brother.

Notes:


John Michael McCown
Aug 12, 1952 - Sep 3, 1952

Infant’s Rites Held Thursday

KERENS, Sept. 4—(Spl)—Funeral services were held in Kerens Thursday afternoon for Michael McCown, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. C. L. McCown, who died Wednesday night at Memorial Hospital in Corsicana.

Graveside rites were held in the Kerens cemetery, with Rev. Vincent, of Cayuga, conducting, at 3 p.m.

Surviving are the parents; and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. McCown of Kerens and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Combs, Cayuga.

Inmon Funeral Home directed.

Notes:


Hattie (Wilson) Kerley
Aug 28, 1883 - Dec 26, 1962

Mrs. Kerley Of Kerens Expires

Mrs. Hattie Kerley, a life-time resident of Kerens, died at the Twilight Home early Thursday morning after an extended illness. She was 79 and had been a resident of the home for three months.

Funeral service will be conducted at Inmon’s Funeral home in Kerens Friday at 2 p.m. with Jim Jackson, minister of the Kerens Church of Christ of which Mrs. Kerley was a member, conducting. Burial will be in the Long Prairie cemetery.

Surviving are the husband, W. H. Kerley of Kerens; two sons, R. Z. Kerley of Houston and Weldon Kerley of Kerens; one daughter, Mrs. B. A. McCown of Bryan, and four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Notes:


William Harris Kerley
Nov 23, 1881 - Feb 19, 1966

Monday Rites For W. H. Kerley

KERENS, Feb. 21 (Spl.)—Funeral services for William Harris Kerley, 84, retired farmer, who died in Memorial hospital Saturday, were held Monday at 2 p.m. from the Paschal Chapel.

The rites were conducted by Asa P. Lipscomb, minister of the local Church of Christ, of which he was a member. Burial was in the Long Prairie cemetery.

Born, Nov. 23, 1881 at Plano, Kerley, lived at Kerens before going to the Twilight Home in Corsicana three years ago.

Surviving are two sons, Robert Zadie Kerley, Houston, and Joseph Weldon Kerley, Kerens; a daughter, Mrs. Annie Mae McCown, Bryan; a sister, Mrs. B. A. Inmon, Kerens; four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and other relatives.

Pallbearers were Whit Scarbrough, Tillman Reed, Newt Stovall, W. L. Bain, Jr.; Aubrey Lee Saunders and M. J. Crawford.

Notes:


Duane Freeman Giles II
Feb. 6, 1965 - May 29, 1968

Duane F. Giles II

KERENS (Spl)—Duane F. Giles II, age 3, died Wednesday in a Dallas hospital. He was a resident of Dallas.

Services will be held at 4 p.m. today in the Paschal Funeral Home here with burial in Long Prairie cemetery.

Survivors are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Duane Giles of Dallas; a sister, Laura Giles of Dallas; Mrs. Ernest Paul of Corsicana, a grandmother; and other grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. William A. Giles of Malakoff.

Notes:


Mary Jane Minerva (Scott) Hanna
Aug 29, 1872 - Dec 28, 1954

Thursday Rites For Mrs. Hanna

Funeral services for Mrs. Mary Hanna, 82, Route 3, who died in Memorial Hospital Tuesday night, were held Thursday at 2 p.m. from the Corley Chapel. Burial was in the New Pursley cemetery.

The rites were conducted by Rev. Bob Evans, Baptist minister, and Rev. W. O. Estes, pastor of the First Baptist church in Dawson.

Mrs. Hanna was a native of Henderson county.

Surviving are four sons, O. A. Hanna, Dallas; W. T. Hanna, Duncan, Oklahoma.; H. L. and J. B. Hanna, both of Corsicana; four daughters, Mrs. Mary A. Taylor, Barry; Mrs. Joe Creasy, Corpus Christi; Mrs. T. M. Davis, Pickett, and Mrs. J. C. Holloway, Corsicana; 37 grandchildren, 52 great-grandchildren, one great-great-grandchild and other relatives.

Grandsons were pallbearers.

Notes:


Joseph Dan Hanna
Sep 12, 1896 - Jul 20, 1953

Rites At Teague For J. D. Hanna

J. D. Hanna, 56, former resident of Corsicana, died at his home in Teague Monday of a heart attack.

Funeral services were held from Hamm’s Funeral Home in Teague Tuesday at 3 p.m., with interment in the Pursley cemetery. Rev. Bob Evans of Tehuacana officiated.

Hanna is survived by his wife of Teague; a son, W. B. Hanna; five daughters, Mrs. Sylvia Sykes, and Avie Joyce Hanna, all of Teague; Mrs. Artie Ward, Trinity, Texas; Mrs. Dean Miles, Kulut, Texas; and Mrs. Maggie Pollard, Corsicana; Mother, Mrs. M. M. Hanna of Dawson; four sisters, including Mrs. G. M. Holloway of Corsicana; four brothers, 13 grandchildren and other relatives.

Nephews were pallbearers.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday, July 22, 1953
  • h/o Anna (Clark) Hanna and Minnie Lee (McGee) Hanna s/o William H. Hanna and Mary Jane Minerva (Scott) Hanna
  • Submitted by Diane Richards

Lillie Mae (Patterson) Smith
Jun 4, 1906 - Aug 9, 1980

Lillie Mae Smith

Funeral service for Mrs. Lillie Mae Smith, 74, was today in the Northside Baptist Church with Rev. David Hale officiating.

Burial was in Laurel Oaks Memorial Park in Dallas.

Mrs. Smith, of Corsicana, died Saturday in theTwilight Home.

Pallbearers were D. L. Simmons, Kenneth Bratz, Charles Flynn, Coy Grace, Bill Holloway, Bill Bolen and Joe Sabo.

Notes:


Cenetta (Stewart) Hasle
Jul 20, 1911 - Jun 19, 1987

Mrs. Cenetta Hasle

Mrs. Cenetta Hasle, 75, of Goodlow died Thursday at Navarro Regional Hospital.

Wake services are 7 p.m. today at Ross and Johnson Mortuary. Funeral services will be 11 a.m. Wednesday at Mr. B. Zion Baptist Church in Goodlow with the Rev. A. H. Henderson officiating. Burial will be in Paradise North Cemetery in Houston.

She is survived by her mother, Mrs. Lessie Stewart of Goodlow; a brother, Jack Stewart of Fort Worth; and a sister, Lillian Stewart of Goodlow.

Pallbearers are L. C. Garneway, Willie Tolliver, Joe Sayles, Preston Sayles and James Martin.

Honorary Pallbearers are Willie Russell, Odell Walker, Grant Robinson, O. D. Harper, Robert Deveraux and Tillman Brown.

Notes:


Willie Ann (Clark) Newton
Feb 16, 1883 - Jun 18, 1987

Mrs. Willie Ann Clark Newton, of Lufkin, died Thursday at the Memorial Medical Center in Lufkin.

Services will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Mt. Beulah Baptist Church in Lufkin and at 3 p.m. Tuesday at the Mt. Olive Baptist Church in Malone. The Rev. L. D. Bell will officiate at both services. Burial will be in Newton Cemetery in Penelope.

Survivors include two daughters, Lula Mae Lawery of Dallas and Alberta Bell of Lufkin; a son, John George Newton of Newark, N. J.; and a host of grandchildren, great grandchildren and great great grandchildren.

Pallbearers are: Johnny B. Newton, Robert Newton, Jr., Charles Robert Newton, Jr., Joe Willie Newton, Mevin Dwayne Bell, Melvin D. Bell, Alvert L. Bell, Samuel E. Bell, Al Newton, Jr., George Newton and Cecil Bell.

Notes:


Joyce Marie (Haynie) Lee
May 8, 1918 - Dec 7, 1992

Joyce Marie Lee

Joyce Marie Lee, 74, Bryan, died Dec. 7, 1992 at St. Joseph Hospital in Bryan.

Services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Ricks Funeral Home Chapel in Jewett. The Rev. Wade Taylor will officiate. Burial will be in Sardis Cemetery.

She was born May 8, 1918 in Newby, Tex. She was a homemaker, a longtime resident of Bryan and a member of Sardis Baptist Church.

She is survived by her husband, Woodrow Lee of Bryan; two brothers, Norris Haynie of Centerville and Louis Haynie of Corsicana; one sister, Thelma Cooper of Fresno, Calif.; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Nephews will serve as pallbearers.

Notes:


Francis Hicklin "Frank" Massey, Sr.
Dec 1, 1874 - May 3, 1947

FRANK H. MASSEY FUNERAL SERVICES SUNDAY AFTERNOON
Frank H. Massey, aged 72 years, died at his home in Kerens Saturday morning at 8:45 o’clock, following several years’ illness.

Funeral services will be held from the Kerens Methodist church Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock.

A native of Chester, S. C., Massey had resided in the Kerens community since 16 years of age.

Surviving are his wife of Kerens; six daughters, Mrs. Herschel McCown, Kerens, Mrs. T. M. Shelton, Jr., Kerens; Mrs. Hubert Ferguson, Corsicana; Mrs. Jack Epps, Jr., Teague; Mrs. James Ansley, Waxahachie, and Miss Mary Jane Massey, student at North Texas State Teachers College, Denton; several grandchildren, a brother, George D. Massey, Houston, and other relatives, including a niece, Mrs. Sam Butler, Corsicana.

Stockton Funeral Home will direct.
Saturday, May 3, 1947

Notes:

  • Prairie Point cemetery
  • h/o Bennie Alice (Tillman) Massey married Aug. 18, 1897; s/o William Heath Massey and Sarah Melissa Ann (Hicklin) Massey buried in White Church cemetery
  • Submitted by Diane Richards



May 4, 1947
F. H. Massey Dies
CORSICANA, Texas, May 4. - Services were held Sunday at the Kerens Methodist Church for Frank H.Massey, 72, who died at his home in Kerens. Surviving are his wife of Kerens; six daughters, several grandchildren and a brother.

Notes:


Francis Hicklin "Buck" Massey, Jr.
Apr 21, 1904 - Jun 15, 1936

Buck Massey, who was killed in a car wreck Monday, was buried in the Prairie Point cemetery Tuesday Afternoon.

Notes:

----

Former Kerens Man Killed In Auto Accident

TYLER, June 15.—(AP)—F. H. Massey, Jr., 32, was killed early today on the Chandler highway seven miles from here when his automobile struck a culvert on the roadside.

Investigators said Massey was apparently asleep. After the impact, they said, the car swerved to the left and into a ditch. Massey was thrown from the vehicle and his neck was broken.

Friends said he had been to Kerens to take Mrs. Massey to visit his parents. He was an oil field worker and had lived here about a year.

Arrangements were made to send the body to Kerens for burial tomorrow.

Notes:

--

ACCIDENT VICTIM WILL BE BURIED AT BAZETTE TUESDAY
KERENS, June 16. -(Spl.) - F.H. Massey, Jr. aged 32, was instantly killed in an automobile accident on Highway 31 about seven miles west of Tyler at an early hour Monday morning. He had visited his parents at Bazette, and was returning to Tyler alone. Indications at the scene of the wreck were that the car went out of control going down a curved hill and lunged into a bridge railing, throwing the driver through the door into the creek below.
The body was taken in charge by a Tyler undertaker and later brought to Kerens by P. N. Stockton of this place, under whose direction funeral services are to be held at the Bazette Methodist church at 5 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. Services will be conducted by Rev. R. H. Helzer of Bazette, assisted by Rev. Bernard McCord of Pioneer and Rev. C. E. Wilkins of Kerens.
Pallbearers are Lester Shelton, Tillman Reed, Clarence H. Massey, C. L. Tillman, Jr., Jack Reed, Rufus Massey.
Mr. Massey is survived by his wife, parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Massey of Bazette; six sisters, Mrs. H. P. McCown, Mrs. T. M. Shelton, Jr., of Kerens, Mrs. Hubert Ferguson of Corsicana: Misses Atwood, Lorraine and Mary Jane Massey of Bazette, and numerous other relatives.

Notes:


Jefferson Davis "Jeff" Jones
1857 - June 1936

Jeff Jones was buried in the Prairie Point cemetery Sunday.

Notes:


 

Bennie Alice (Tillman) Massey
May 18, 1878 - Apr 27, 1965

Mrs. Massey Of Kerens Expires

KERENS, April 28 (Spl)—Mrs. F. H. Massey, 86, native of Lancaster county, S.C., died at her home here Tuesday night. She had resided in this area for 73 years.

Funeral services will be held Thursday at 3 p.m. from the First Methodist church, of which she was an active member, with burial in the Prairie Point cemetery. The rites will be conducted by Rev. J. W. Hodge, pastor of the church.

Surviving are six daughters, Mrs. Annie McCown and Mrs. Jessie Mae Shelton, both of Kerens; Mrs. Juanita Ferguson, Waco; Mrs. Atwood Eppes, Teague; Mrs. Lorraine Ansley and Mrs. Mary Jane Coleman, both of Fort Worth; a sister, Mrs. Jessie Jones, Kerens; 10 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

Paschal Funeral Home directs.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday, April 28, 1965
  • w/o Frank Hicklin Massey married Aug. 18, 1897 d/o Isaac William Tillman and Mary Jane (Cureton) Tillman buried in Dresden Cemetery
  • Submitted by Diane Richards

Jessie Lee Beamon, Sr.
Dec 23, 1925 - Dec 1, 1989

Jessie Beamon Sr.

Mr. Jessie L. Beamon, Sr., 63, a resident of Corsicana, died Dec. 1, 1989, at Baylor Hospital in Dallas.

Services will be at 11 a.m. Monday at the Griffin Roughton Funeral Home. The Rev. John Shero will officiate. Burial will be at Resthaven Memorial Park.

He was a member of the Westhill Church of Christ and was retired from Southwestern Bell Telephone. He was a veteran of World War 11 and served in the Navy. He was a member of the Telephone Pioneers Red Bud Club.

Memorials should be sent to the Weshill Church of Christ.

He is survived by his wife, Mary B. Beamon of Corsicana; four sons, Lee Beamon of Tulsa, Okla., Paul, of Bowie, Maryland, Randy and Brian both of Corsicana; eight grandchildren; three brothers, Blair and Albert, both of Corsicana and Franklin of Vallejo, Calif,; one sister, Ann Thomas of Lancaster.

Pallbearers will be Barney Gaines, Johnny Robinson, Jimmy Thomas, David Mahoney, James Olsen, Don Bowen, Virgil Moore 111 and Joe Glass.

Honorary pallbearers will be Anthony Gladberry, Terry Meneley, Paul Kenner, Rick Moore, Doug Beamon, Jessie Beamon 111, Blake Beamon and Dwayne Thomas.

Notes:


Nancy Jane (Allison) Kraus
Sep 1, 1879 - May 31, 1968

Mrs. Nancy Kraus

Mrs. Nancy Jane Kraus, a five-year resident of Corsicana, died Friday in Memorial Hospital.

She was 88 years old.

Services are scheduled for 2 p.m. Sunday at Corley Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Robert Potts officiating. Interment will be in Resthaven Memorial Park.

She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. R. V. Hair of Corsicana, and Mrs. M. Gelber of Dallas; four grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and a sister, Mrs. W. L. George of Beaumont.

Pallbearers will be L. E. Riley, Marvin Fannin, Fred Saxon, Glen Price, Vernon George and Jim George.

Notes:


James William “Jim” Garrison
Aug 4, 1871 - Nov 13, 1954

EXAMINING TRIAL FOR JIM GARRISON SET FOR THURSDAY

AUD WASHBURN SHOT AND INSTANTLY KILLED AT WILDCAT FERRY

Examining trial for Jim Garrison, 60, farmer, resident of the southeastern section of Navarro of Navarro county, on a formal complaint for murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, 51, near Wildcat Ferry, Monday, is scheduled before Judge T. A. Crowley, Kerens justice of the peace, sometime Thursday, Cleo G. Miller, criminal district attorney, announced Wednesday morning. Judge Crowley announced the examining trial would be held as soon as the witnesses could be procured.

The formal complaint was filed before Judge Crowley by A. H. Holloway, Kerens constable.

Garrison, was arrested by R. A. McCarter, special Texas ranger, and was turned over to county authorities and was placed in the county jail. He still was in jail Wednesday.

Sheriff Rufus Pevehouse said the slaying occurred at the home of Garrison. Officers said a shotgun charge took effect in Washburn’s chest.

Conflicting stories which could not be verified were heard in Corsicana and Kerens relative to incidents immediately preceding the trouble.

Funeral services for Washburn were held at Kerens Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock with burial in the Kerens cemetery. Surviving are two brothers, Charley and Bert Washburn, both of the Kerens community; and a sister, Mrs. E. J. Gilbert, Wortham.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Wednesday Dec 26, 1934
  • Submitted by Diane Richards
  • h/o Amanda “Mandy” (Bonner) Langridge-Garrison married Jul. 28, 1924 buried at Hamilton Beeman cemetery s/o J. W. Garrison and Mandy (Johnson) Garrison Brother to Mrs. Will Robinson (Jane) buried at Oakwood cemetery



COURTHOUSE NEWS
Criminal District Attorney’s Office

Mr. Miles, one of the state witnesses in the case against Jim Garrison, charged with murder, died near Wildcat Ferry Thursday, John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, stated Friday.

Garrison is charged with murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn near Wildcat Ferry several days ago.

Notes:



Habeas Corpus Filed on Friday For Garrison

A writ of habeas corpus was Friday morning for J. W. (Jim) Garrison by his attorney, A. P. Mays, and District Judge J. S. Callicutt set hearing for Thursday, January 17.

Garrison was indicted for murder by the grand jury Thursday in connection with the fatal shooting of Aube Washburn near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, and had been remanded to jail without bail by Justice T. A. Crowley of Kerens at the conclusion of an examining hearing conducted several days ago.

Notes:



COURTHOUSE NEWS.
District court.
The habeas corpus proceedings hearing for Jim Garrison scheduled for Thursday has been postponed until Saturday. John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, stated Thursday.

Garrison is in jail on an indictment for murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aube Washburn near Rural Shade several weeks ago. He was remanded to jail without bail and the habeas corpus proceedings were instituted by A. P. Mays, defense attorney.

Notes:



HABEAS CORPUS PROCEEDINGS IN DISTRICT COURT

A habeas corpus proceedings hearing was in progress in the thirteenth judicial district court before District Judge J. S. Callicutt, Thursday, on behalf of Jim Garrison, charged by indictment with murder, in connection with the fatal shooting of Aube Washburn, 51, Dec. 24, 1934, at the home of Garrison near Wildcat Ferry, in the extreme southeastern corner of Navarro county.

Garrison has been held in the county jail without bail since his arrest shortly after the shooting of Washburn. At the conclusion of an examining trial before Justice of the Peace T. A. Crowley of the Kerens precinct, Garrison was remanded to jail without bail.

Garrison is represented by A. P. Mays while the state is being represented by John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, and Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor.

Several witnesses testified at the morning session Thursday and attorneys indicated that from the list of witnesses scheduled to be heard, it was likely that the hearing would not be completed until sometime late Friday or Saturday.

Both men resided in the same community.

Notes:



GARRISON ALLOWED BAIL IN SUM $5,000 ON MURDER CHARGE

IS CHARGED WITH KILLING OF AUDE WASHBURN IN EASTERN PART COUNTY

Jim Garrison, charged with murder, was allowed bail in the sum of $5,000 late Thursday afternoon by J. S. Callicutt, judge of the Thirteenth judicial district court, after a day’s testimony had been introduced in a habeas corpus proceeding brought to force the granting of bail. It was agreed by the state and defense attorneys that the testimony of another witness could be taken at a later time and was heard Friday morning.

Garrison was remanded to jail without bail by Justice T. A. Crowley after an examining trial hearing. Garrison was later indicted by the Navarro county grand jury on a murder charge in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, Dec. 24, 1934, at the home of Garrison, in the extreme southeastern portion of the county.

A large number of witnesses were heard Thursday in the habeas corpus proceeding. The hearing had been scheduled for several different times, but had been postponed on account of trials of suits in court, and whether conditions which interfered with the witness reaching Corsicana.

The state represented by John P. Curington, criminal district attorney Chris L. Knox, assistant criminal district attorney; and Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor, formerly criminal district attorney. The defense is represented by Mays and Mays.

Notes:



COURTHOUSE NEWS.
Sheriff’s Office.

Jim Garrison was released on bond in the sum of $5,000 from the Navarro county jail Friday night. This amount of bond was set by District Judge J. S. Callicutt during a habeas corpus proceeding after Garrison had been remanded to jail without bail on a murder charge in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, December 24, 1934. The habeas corpus hearing was conducted Thursday and Friday in the district court.

Notes:



COURTHOUSE NEWS.
District Court.
The jury for the week was excused Wednesday morning until Thursday morning at 10 o’clock when attorneys in a pending civil matter decided to present the case before Judge J. S. Callicutt.
An affidavit for contempt of court proceedings was filed Wednesday morning against Jim Garrison for alleged violation of an injunction granted in the case of Mandie Garrison vs. Jim Garrison, divorce and injunction, restraining and enjoining the defendant from disposing of personal property. Judge Callicutt set the hearing down for Saturday, Feb. 9.

Garrison is at liberty on bond in the sum of $5,000 following a habeas corpus hearing last week on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. the case is set for trial in the district court Wednesday, Feb. 13.

A special venire for service in the Garrison case and another special venire in the case of the State of Texas vs. Selma Burnett, murder, will be drawn by District Judge Callicutt, Thursday, it was stated Wednesday.

Burnett faces an indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Hugh Griffin at Blooming Grove, May 21, 1932. Burnett’s case is set for trial Wednesday February 6.

Notes:



JIM GARRISON ON TRIAL IN DISTRICT COURT FOR MURDER

PROSECUTION MOTION FOR CONTINUANCE OVERRULED BY SPECIAL JUDGE

The trial of Jim Garrison charged by indictment with murder, got under way in the Thirteenth Judicial district court Wednesday afternoon before Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett.

Garrison is charged by indictment with murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn near Wildcat Ferry, in the extreme southeastern corner of Navarro county, Dec. 24, 1934.

John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, called a list of the witnesses and made a formal motion for continuance due to the absence of a number of witnesses including one woman who is reported in West Texas. the motion was denied by the Court. The request for a list of state witnesses by Defense Attorney A. P. Mays, was complied with.

The regular jury for the week and the special venire of approximately 75 prospective jurors were ordered to report back at 1:30 o’clock by Judge Lovett.

The state is being represented by District Attorney Curington and Special Prosecutor Cleo G. Miller, former criminal district attorney, while the defendant is being represented by the firm of Mays and Mays.

The defendant recently was released on bond in the sum of $5,000 following a habeas corpus proceeding brought before District Judge J. S. Callicutt.

Notes:



ACQUITTAL MOTION IS OVERRULED TODAY IN GARRISON CASE

STATE RESTS AND DEFENSE TESTIMONY UNDER WAY IN MURDER TRIAL

A defense motion for an instructed verdict of acquittal was overruled by Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett shortly before noon Friday after the state had rested and defense testimony started at 1:30 p.m. in the trial of Jim Garrison on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, 51, at Garrison’s home near Trinity River, in the Wildcat Ferry community, Dec. 24, last.

Six witness were heard for the state at the Friday morning session of court. Those appearing on the witness stand included Chester Ray, Kerens undertaker; A. H. Holloway, Kerens Constable; Earl Bruner, L. M. Henderson and Jim Rowe. The shirt alleged to have been worn at the time by the deceased, a shotgun and two shotgun shells were introduced in evidence.

The introduction of testimony was punctuated to objections by attorneys and the trial is being contested at many stages of testimony.

The trial is attracting considerable attention and all available seats in the courtroom and balconies are filled with interested spectators while scores are standing in the aisles and about the walls of the courtroom.

Argue Defense motion.
The jury was excluded from the room while the arguments of the attorneys on the defense motion for an instructed verdict of not guilty were heard. The defense maintained the state had failed to show that the defendant was guilty and that the state also had proven if Garrison had slain Washburn, it was justifiable; that by the state’s own testimony it had proven Garrison shot a hi-jacker in self-defense;; and further that the state had not established a motive or intent to kill Washburn.

The state attorneys pointed out that Aude Washburn and Jim Garrison had been together a short time before the slaying; that later Washburn’s body was found in Garrison’s home; that the defendant had stated prior to his arrest that he had killed a man in his house and that Washburn’s lifeless body was found in the house; and that witnesses had denied the defense contention that a hi-jacker with a knife and wearing a mask had been reported by the defendant.

Chester Ray, Kerens undertaker, was the first witness Friday morning. He testified he had been called to Garrison’s home and found the body of Aude Washburn about 3:15 o’clock on the afternoon of Dec. 24, 1934. He said the body was lying on the floor in Garrison’s house, a one-room building on the Corsicana Wildcat Ferry road, with the head within two inches of the stove. He described the furniture, etc. in the building. He testified he did not make an examination of the body until he had it taken to the undertaking parlors in Kerens. Ray testified a double-barreled shotgun was lying on the bed.

Described Wound.
The witness described a wound in the right chest below the collarbone but did not probe in the wound or hold a post mortem examination. He said it appeared to be a gunshot wound and not made by a pistol. He said he did not find any knives or other weapons on the body and there was no appearance of disorder in the house. The undertaker said he found food in the mouth of Aude Washburn.

Under re-direct testimony, Ray said Garrison resided in a “shot-gun” tenant house on the farm of Will Kerr within a few hundred yards of Trinity river.

Under re-direct testimony, Ray said a shotgun exhibited by state attorneys, looked like the one he saw at the Garrison’s home.

The motion of Defense Attorney A. P. Mays to exclude the introduction of the shirt in evidence as prejudicial was over ruled by Judge Lovett.

Justice of Peace Is Witness.
T. A. Crowley, justice of the peace, at Kerens for the past six years, was the second witness and the defense attempted to disqualify him as he had brought the clothes of Washburn into the courtroom while another witness was on the stand in what defense Attorney Mays contended was in violation of the rule of witnesses. Judge Crowley said he brought the clothes into the courtroom on the order of the sheriff.

The Kerens justice said he held an inquest over the body of Washburn about 3 o’clock. He explained the wound, etc., and said he saw a shotgun standing beside the door. He positively identified the gun exhibited by the state attorneys and said the gun had one empty and one loaded shell in it. He said the left barrel had the empty shell in it.

Under cross-examination, the witness said the gun had been in his (Crowley’s) and the sheriff’s possession since the time of tragedy. He said that he had never known of any previous trouble between Garrison and Washburn.

Tell of Arrest.
A.H. Holloway, Kerens constable said he and Special Texas Ranger R. A. McCarter went to Garrison’s house about 2:30 o’clock. Holloway arrested the defendant and turned him over to McCarter to bring him to jail in Corsicana. He said Judge Crowley arrived about 40 minutes or an hour after he (Holloway) reached Garrison’s house. Holloway related he went to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Reed and found Mrs. Garrison there and then returned to the Garrison residence. Under cross-examination, Holloway said Garrison made no attempt to run away or evade arrest.

Visited Garrison’s Home.
Earl Bruner, farmer who had visited at Garrison’s house a number of times said he was present at the scene of the slaying about 3 o’clock on the afternoon of the alleged slaying. He had hunted with Garrison’s shotgun and said the shotgun presented looked like the same one he had hunted with. He testified the gun was sitting behind a trunk in the corner of the room when he saw it. When he (Bruner) came to Garrison’s place he testified, Garrison was at the house of R. B. Miles, now deceased, across the road from that occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Garrison.

Bruner said he met Garrison and that Garrison talked about hunting, etc., and didn’t say anything about any trouble in his (Bruner’s) hearing until after the officers arrived. He said Garrison did not walk like a drunken man and carried on a sensible conversation, and carried the two Hendersons to his smokehouse to look at his meat.

Under cross-examination, Bruner said he had used Garrison’s gun and squirrel gun and that (Garrison) was a good neighbor. He also said he knew Garrison and Washburn drank liquor.

Tells of Conversation.
L. M. Henderson said he went to the scene of the trouble about 2 or 2:30 o’clock, Dec. 24, 1934, and that he was shown meat and lard in the smokehouse by Garrison. He testified that Garrison told him a man came in on him (Garrison) with a knife after his (Garrison’s) money and that he (Garrison) shot him. He said Garrison told him he didn’t know the man he shot. Henderson said Garrison did not seem alarmed; that Garrison had had a drink or two but talked all right.

Jim Rowe said he found Washburn dead in the house of Garrison. He quoted Garrison as saying to him; “I killed a ------- ------ -------. He tried to rob me”

Could Walk All Right.
He said Garrison was able to talk all right; that he (Rowe) arrived about 1 o’clock Christmas eve afternoon. He testified Garrison told him he (Garrison) had killed a hi-jacker. The witness said he told the defendant that he (Garrison) had killed Aude Washburn, but Garrison replied he had killed a hi-jacker who was after him.

The witness denied anything was said about a mask.

Row testified he saw a jar two-thirds full of what he thought was liquor under a table in the house. He said Washburn was dead and plates were on the table.

Earl Bruner was recalled and said Garrison was married and that his wife was not present when he arrived. The state rested at 11:24 a.m.

Thursday Afternoon Session.
Completion of a jury and the hearing of evidence from three state witnesses, none eye-witnesses to the shooting, was accomplished at Thursday afternoon’s session of court. Garrison entered a plea of “not guilty” when arraigned on an indictment, charging him with murder, in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, Dec. 24, 1934, at his (Garrison’s) home near Wildcat Ferry. The indictment was read by Criminal District Attorney Curington.

Forty veniremen were examined before the jury of twelve was completed. The state exercised six challenges and the defense excused seven while fifteen were excused for cause by Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett.

The three remaining special veniremen and all of the jurors for the week were finally excused by Judge Lovett after the jury was completed.

Defense Attorney A. P. Mays challenged M. G. Deason of Blooming Grove, due to the fact that the jury list carried his name as G. M. Deason, but after the court had overruled the proposal, both state and defense accepted him as the twelfth member of the jury. The jury was completed at 3:25 o’clock Thursday afternoon and the introduction of testimony started a short time after the arraignment.

The rule was demanded and all witnesses, except Bert Washburn of Kerens, brother of the deceased Aude Washburn were ordered excluded from the room.

Brother Is Witness.
Bert Washburn, brother of the slain man, aged, 49, manager of the Texas Power and Light company at Kerens, was the first witness to be called. The examination of the witnesses Thursday afternoon was conducted by Special Prosecutor Cleo G. Miller. Cross-examination was carried on by Defense Counsel A. P. Mays.

Washburn testified that Aude Washburn was 51 years of age and had lived with him (Bert Washburn) for a number of years until the past December when he (Bert Washburn) rented a farm near Wilcat Ferry and sent his brother to the place to be in charge. The far was 41/2 or 5 miles south of Rural Shade, the witness said, and Jim Rowe was staying with the deceased. He said he saw his brother the day prior to the shooting. The witness said he didn’t know the defendant. Under cross-examination, Washburn said his brother, Aude Washburn had never married, and also was a heavy drinker.

Visited Garrison Home.
White West, 35, married, resident of the Rural Shade vicinity, testified that he had known Jim Garrison and Aude Washburn seven years. He said he had visited in Garrison’s home and had had “business dealings with him.” He related he saw the two men on Dec. 24; that as he (West) passed Garrison’s place he saw him (Garrison) in his (Garrison’s) door with a horse saddled in the yard; later saw Garrison riding horseback 200 or 300 yards behind him (West) in the road but didn’t catch up with him. He said he met Washburn in a trailer with two mules hitched to it near the home of Tom Combs, spoke and drove by. He (West) testified that he later looked back, saw Garrison tie his (Garrison’s) horse to the back of Washburn’s trailer and get in the trailer with him (Washburn) and put his arm about Washburn’s neck. He said this occurred about 11 o’clock in the morning, and was about 1 ½ or 2 miles from Garrison’s home.

Cross-Examination.
On cross-examination, the witness admitted that he had taken drinks with Garrison and also stated that Garrison and Washburn were good friends ant that he had never heard of any trouble between them and had never known of any known of any trouble between the two men, and saw no indication of any trouble or ill feeling between the two men as they rode together down the road toward Garrison’s residence.

John Reed, who resided two miles from Wildcat Ferry, former of Rural Shade, said he knew both men and that he was a neighbor of Garrison. He testified he met the two men in the trailer the morning of the shooting in the road within a half mile of Garrison’s home. He said the trio were old friends and talked joked for a time and took two drinks of whiskey from a half-gallon fruit jar. Reed was about 100 yards from his residence and said he laid a number of traps in the trailer while they were talking about “old times” and “what good friends we were.” He said he was told that Washburn was going to Garrison’s home for dinner.

Reed said he did not see any gun in the trailer and also that he did not consider either man drunk.

Under cross-examination, Reed said that Washburn remarked;
“Uncle Jim (Garrison) is the best friend I’ve got in the world.”

Reed said he went home and heard of the shooting within an hour.

The jury was instructed not to read newspapers unless any reference to the trial had been deleted. Court adjourned at 4:37 p.m. until 9:30 a.m. Friday.

The jury in the case is Pete Goodin, Navarro; R. M. Fulton, Blooming Grove; Alex Bryant, Blooming Grove; Wayne Elrod, Drane; Tom Hardan, Pursley; A. J. Chamberlain, Frost; Don Sawyer, Richland; T. C. Dillard, Corsicana; J. M. Harvard, Navarro; A. E. Drain, Emhouse; John Garner, Sr., Corsicana; and M. G. Deason, Blooming Grove.

Notes:


TESTIMONY ENDS IN GARRISON TRAIL AS DEFENSE RESTS CASE

JUDGE ADJOURNS COURT UNTIL MONDAY WHEN CHARGE WILL BE PRESENTED
Testimony in the trial of Jim Garrison, 62, on trial in the Thirteenth judicial district court on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934, was abruptly ended early Saturday afternoon with the unexpected announcement from Defense Counsel A. P. Mays that the defense rested and would not put on additional witnesses. The morning session of court had been used in rebuttal testimony was expected at the afternoon sessions.

Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett adjourned court until Monday morning at 9:30 o’clock at which time he will present his charge to the jury and the arguments of attorneys is expected to follow immediately. The court announced that an addition to the regular charge, he would include D. Ts and alcoholic hallucinosis was insanity, that drunkenness was no defense for crime, and also would charge on exculpatory statements and self defense.

Seven state rebuttal witnesses were used Saturday morning, five saying Garrison’s reputation as a peaceful, law-abiding citizen was bad and the other two testified they had known Garrison for years but couldn’t testify about his reputation.

The courtroom was filled to capacity an hour before the afternoon session started and many did not go for lunches for fear that would lose their vantage seats for the afternoon court procedure.

It was elicited from the state witnesses by defense counsel that the defendant drank liquor, had engaged in several personal difficulties, but none of their own knowledge knew whether the defendant was justified or not.

The defense attempted to keep the state from introducing testimony on the general reputation of the defendant due to the fact that the state had not brought this phase out in direct examination before resting the case the first time. The motion was overruled by the Court and the jury was brought back into the courtroom.

Witnesses Testifying.
Those testifying Saturday morning included L. M. Henderson, J. R. Bruner, D. E. Morton, Dick Holloman, R. B. Blissett, Tom Collins and Judge T. A. Crowley (re-called). Holloman and Blissett testified they had known the defendant for a number of years but did not know his general reputation.

Judge Crowley admitted under cross-examination that he was friendly to the prosecution and said he had fined Garrison on an assault case several years ago after the case had been transcripted to the district court and returned. He admitted he had heard of trouble in which Garrison was involved including a fight and cutting scrape but no complaints or arrests were made out of his court in these connections.

Knew Garrison 25 years.
Collins testified he had known Garrison for 25 years and that Garrison had been in trouble and that his reputation was bad before Garrison went to Rural Shade. He admitted that he (Collins) was a close friend to the Washburn Brothers.

Morton said he had heard Garrisons reputation discussed before the shooting and heard of threats made by the defendant, but had never heard him carrying out threats.

Henderson testified that he had seen Garrison about his gin at Rural Shade when he was not drinking.

After five witnesses had testified, Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor, announced the state would rest with provision additional character witnesses be allowed to be heard later. The defense declined to agree to this proposal and the trail was halted for about a half hour.

Courtroom Crowded.
The courtroom was filled with interested spectators at Saturday morning’s session, but the aisles and balconies were not jammed as Friday afternoon.

Defense Counsel A. P. Mays said shortly before noon that the completion of testimony would be accomplished during the afternoon. It is highly probable, according to attaches of the court, that the charge of the judge will be prepared during the week-end and arguments of the attorneys given probably Monday afternoon, with the case likely not to be given the jury before late Monday or Tuesday morning.

Friday Afternoon’s Session.
Jim Garrison, the defendant, testified Friday afternoon on his own behalf and remained on the stand for one hour and 30 minutes. He related incidents and occurrences of the morning prior to the shooting of Washburn, and declared that he did not shoot Washburn, but shot at a masked man advancing on him with a knife in his hand who failed to heed his command to stop. Four local physicians testified relative to “D.T.’s” and alcoholic disturbances caused by excessive use of liquor.

The defense rested shortly before the court recessed Friday afternoon. The jury was excluded on several occasions while opposing counsel argued various points of evidence and procedure.

Garrison said he had never been convicted of a felony, was a native of Arkansas, but had resided in Texas since 1882. Most of the time since then having been spent in Navarro county. He said he resided in the Wildcat Ferry community for the past 12 years.

Regular Liquor User.
The defendant said he had been a regular liquor drinker for the last 15 or 16 years and for a year prior to Christmas Eve Day, 1934, had drunk more or less every day—from one-half pint to a quart of home-made whiskey.

Garrison said for a week or ten days prior to the time of the shooting, he had been unable to rest at night, had no appetite. He recounted trouble with a man named Hardin and that at night he thought he could see Hardin’s face, and hear him talking outside of his window. He also said at times he imagined he was being poisoned, and saw snakes in his home.

The Witness testified that he had known Washburn for 8 or 9 years and that he (Washburn) was as good a friend as he (Garrison) had ever had—they had never had any trouble or “falling out.”

“I had no reason or intent to kill Washburn,’” Garrison said.

The defendant testified he arose on the morning of December 24, fed his mules, drank a cup of coffee and saddled his horse. He said his enemy, Hardin, passed his house in a car going toward Rural Shade and about an hour later he (Garrison) went to the home of Charley Combs, saw a sick child, and then went to Tom Comb’s place where he met Aude Washburn. He said he procured a quart of whiskey and that the deceased had a half gallon of liquor. He tied his horse to the back of the trailer occupied by Washburn and then climbed into the trailer with his friend and they took two drinks. He said Washburn decided to accompany him home to discuss a mule trade and en route met John Reed, an old acquaintance, and the trio took a couple of drinks. Garrison said he couldn’t remember the conversations between the three friends, but there was no trouble of any kind. He said after he and Washburn reached his (Garrison’s) house, they fixed them a toddy and looked at the mules. Garrison said Washburn remarked to him that he (Washburn) was going home and have Jim Rowe stop work as it was so near Christmas and that Washburn drove off.

Garrison said he returned to his house and made himself another toddy and picked up his shotgun and was preparing to go out and shoot crows when a man with a rag over his face and a knife in his hand came into the door.

Says Didn’t Kill Washburn.
The defendant said he thought the man was either a robber or Hardin. He said if he killed Washburn, he didn’t know it. He said he had no reason to kill Washburn and thought that Washburn had gone home. He said as soon as he fired at the man in the middle of his house, he (Garrison) went out of the back door and “reckoned” he went to Miles. He said he remembered talking to Jim Rowe at Miles’ place, across the road, but did not recall talking to L. M. Henderson or showing him his meat and lard in his (Garrison’s) smokehouse. He said his arrest by Constable A. H. Holloway seemed like a dream.

Garrison testified that in October, 1934, he was hit in the head with a clevis or singletree. He said he stayed in jail a month and four days after his arrest and since that time had been with his sister, Mrs. Will Robinson. He said he had not taken a drink of liquor since Christmas and didn’t ever expect to again.

The defendant was subjected to grueling cross-examination at the hand of John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, after the direct examination had been concluded by Defense Attorney A. P. Mays.

Attorneys Check Memory.
The district attorney queried him about his memory about his business transactions, the about of money made in previous years, the number of bales of cotton produced, etc. The witness said he couldn’t tell the amount of his income last year, but he thought he made about nine bales of cotton.

The witness admitted that he had trouble with Hardin at his (Garrison’s) place about one and one-half years ago.

“You cut him all to pieces didn’t you?” the district attorney queried. Defense objections ensued and the jury was excluded as the attorneys argued the admissability of the evidence and the court ruled the evidence and question not admissable as no indictments had been returned.

He was grilled relative to his statements about seeing the face of Harden at his (Garrison’s) window at nights. He was unable to tell the number of times, how he was dressed, etc., and admitted that the face at the window did not try to harm him.

Garrison admitted that Hardin did not say anything to him or try to harm him when he passed that morning in a car.

When District Attorney Curington asked the defendant if the delusions had stopped after he (Garrison) had killed Washburn, the witness declared;
“I didn’t kill Aude Washburn.”

Says Not Crazy Now.
Garrison said he was not crazy now and under questioning of the district attorney recounted the meeting of Washburn at the Comb’s residence and their trip to Garrison’s home, reaching his home about 10:30 or 11 a.m. He said that Washburn left about 11 a.m. and had been gone 25 or 30 minutes before the shooting.

Recounting the events of the time of the shooting, the defendant said his assailant had a handkerchief or mask over face and a knife in his hand. He was sitting by the stove when the man appeared in the door, Garrison said, fixing to go shoot crows. He said he couldn’t say what kind of handkerchief it was except it was white.

Garrison said he shot the man as he (the man) was about in the middle of the room, but didn’t know where he fell and was not sure he had killed him. He said he didn’t know which barrel he discharged.

The witness said he “sorter came to myself and I was over at Miles.” He said he knew he had shot somebody. He remembered Rowe coming over and that he (Garrison) told him he had shot a hi-jacker. He said Jim Rowe said it was Aude Washburn, and that he (Garrison) told Rose he (Garrison) would not harm Aude. He did not remember talking to Henderson.

Garrison testified he was drunk but could walk all right.

Under re-direct examination by A. P. Mays, Garrison said he resided about 300 yards from Trinity river, and also testified that he could get all of the liquor he (Garrison) wanted without paying for it.

Doctors On Stand.
Drs. Dubart Miller, Will Miller, T. O. Wills and J. Wilson David, all of Corsicana, were called as defense witnesses. Attorney Mays outlined incidents surrounding and prior to the tragedy and asked questions relative to “D. T.’s” and alcoholic hallucinosis, etc., and they testified that a person thus affected would not know right from wrong.

Under cross-examination by Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor, the physicians said that this condition was usually lasting from one day to a much longer period. Dr. Dubart Miller said he had never heard of a man with “D.T.s” and it affecting him only 30 minutes and should a person be affected, should show signs all day and couldn’t suddenly contract the disease.

The physicians said persons often could recollect events and happenings during their illness. All said they had not examined Garrison and did not know him personally.

Dr. Opie Wills said at times a person so affected would act like a normal person, and under cross-examination, said he had never seen a person have “D.T.s” two hours and never have another trace of it.

Dr, Will Miller testified there was no way to tell the duration of the affeciation but that it generally did not come on a moments notice and leave the same way. He said usually the general system of the patient had broken down.

Dr. J. Wilson David said a person could have alcoholic hallucinosis for a short time and differentiated between “D.T.s” and the alcoholic hallucinosis, although they are closely related.

Variance in Diseases.
He said that “D.T.s” last for some time but that acute alcoholic hallucinosis could result and within an hour be gone—that it would vary on the individual, as the amount of liquor necessary to cause intoxication varies with individuals, etc.

Mrs. Will Robinson, sister of the defendant, testified she owned 900 acres of land in Navarro county.

The question asked her by Attorney A. P. Mays whether she would give the defendant a home the remainder of his life and look after him if he was acquitted was objected to by the state and Judge Lovett sustained the objection. At this point the witness was excused and court was adjourned until Saturday morning.

Standing room was a premium for a considerable time before the Friday afternoon sessions got under way and difficulty was experienced in getting witness through the press of the crowds in the aisles and in all available places in the courtroom. The judge was forced several times to order spectators from crowding too closely to the jury box.

Notes:


TRIAL INTERRUPTED BY DEATH DAUGHTER OF ONE JURY MEMBER

NOT KNOWN MONDAY MORNING WHEN REUMPTION OF CASE ANTICIPATED
The trial of Jim Garrison on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat “Ferry, December 24, 1934, was interrupted Monday morning when Miss Turner Mae Garner, teacher in the Corsciana public schools, daughter of John T. Garner, was taken suddenly ill and died within a few hours. Mr. Garner is one of the twelve men on the jury trying Garrison and was allowed to go to the hospital and later to his home in company with Jack Floyd, deputy sheriff. The remaining eleven members of the jury are locked up at the courthouse.

Testimony Completed.
Testimony was completed Saturday and Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett had his charge ready to present to the jury and start the arguments of the attorneys Monday morning. The courtroom again was filled with interested spectators.

Judge Lovett and attorneys in the case perused the statutes carefully in an effort to find a law whereby the juror could be released, but under the statutes, should the juror be discharged, the defendant would stand acquitted under “former jeopardy” law.

When Mr. Garner’s daughter was stricken, Judge Lovett, with agreement of counsel, Richard and A. P. Mays, allowed the juror to go to her bedside with Deputy Sheriff Floyd at an early hour Monday morning. Judge Lovett quoted the following statutes:
Law is Quoted.
Article 623, Revised Criminal Statutes, Texas, 1925: “Jurors shall not separate. The court may adjourn veniremen to any day of term; but when jurors have been sworn in a case, those so sworn shall be kept together and not permitted to separate until a verdict has been rendered or the jury finally discharged, unless by permission of the court, with the consent of each party and in charge of an officer.”

Judge Lovett Monday afternoon announced that the trial would be resumed Wednesday morning and instructed the eleven jurors to remain in the custody of the sheriff, warned them not to discuss the case among themselves or allow anyone to discuss the case with them.

Notes:



Courthouse News
District Court.
Non-jury matters were scheduled to be heard in the district court Tuesday.

The trial of Jim Garrison on a murder indictment as a result of the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn near Wildcat Ferry, December 24, 1934 is scheduled to be resumed in the district court Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock with the delivery of Judge Norris W. Lovett’s charge. Arguments of the attorneys will start after the delivery of the court’s charge to the jury.

Notes:

 


ARGUMENTS STARTED IN GARRISON CASE ON WEDNESDAY MORNING

COURTROOM BEEN CROWDED WITH SPECTATORS THROUGHOUT TRIAL

Arguments of attorneys to the jury in the trial of Jim Garrison, 62, on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, 51, near Wildcat Ferry, in the extreme southeastern section of Navarro county, Dec. 24, 1934, got under way in the Thirteen judicial district court Wednesday morning at 10:15 o’clock following the reading of the charge to the jury by Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett.

Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor, and former criminal district attorney, opened the arguments for the state. He was followed by Richard Mays, defense. A. P. Mays finished for the defense while John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, will close for the state this afternoon.

Much Interest in Case.
Interest in the case was still maintained and standing room was at a premium Wednesday morning as has been the case since the trial opened a week ago.

Garrison entered a plea of not guilty when arraigned last Wednesday and the trial has been bitterly contested throughout.

The trial was interrupted Monday morning when Miss Turner Mae Garner, Corsicana public school teacher, daughter of John T. Garner, one of the jurors, was stricken and died. By agreement, the juror, with Deputy Sheriff Jack Floyd accompanying him was allowed to go to his home and returned to the jury late Tuesday following the funeral rites.

Testimony was concluded Saturday afternoon.

Judge Delivers Charge.
Included in the charge delivered to the jury by Judge Lovett were definitions of murder, with and without malice, self defense, delirium tremens, acute alcoholic hallucinosis, ect., giving the penalties prescribed by law in event of conviction, and also dealing with the application for suspended sentence in the event of conviction.

The charge included several verdict forms for use after decision had been reached.

The charge defined murder with malice as the wrongful act done intentional without cause or excuse. Punishment of murder with malice is by death, life imprisonment or any term of years not less than two. The penalty for conviction of murder without malice is from two to five years.

Insanity Defined.
It was brought out in the charge that temporary insanity, delirium tremens, acute alcoholic hallucinosis were kinds of insanity recognized by law and that a person must be of sound memory and discretion before they can be punished for crime.

The charge also contained a provision setting forth that intoxication or temporary insanity of mind, produced by voluntary recent use of ardent spirits, is not an excuse.

The jurors were instructed that a person was presumed to be innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, and also defined self defense and the condition of a defendant’s mind at the time of the shooting as to whether he thought his life was in danger from an armed hi-jacker.

The twelve men were also in instructed that the indictment against Jim Garrison or his motion for a suspended sentence if convicted was no evidence of guilt and was not to be thus considered.

Notes:



GARRISON IS FOUND GUILTY; PUNISHMENT ASSESSED 10 YEARS

DEFENSE ATTORNEYS EXPECTED TO FILE MOTION FOR NEW TRIAL

After deliberating slightly more than one hour and thirty minutes Wednesday afternoon, the jury in the trial of Jim Garrison, 62, on a murder indictment for the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, 51, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934, returned a verdict of guilty and assessed his punishment at confinement in the penitentiary for ten years. Notice of appeal was immediately given by A. P. Mays, defense attorney.

Conclusion of arguments of the attorneys was made about 4 o’clock Wednesday afternoon and the jury returned its verdict shortly after 5:30 o’clock.

New Trial Motion Expected.
A formal motion for a new trial is expected to be filed immediately before Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett, by the defense.

After Washburn was shot with a shotgun in the right chest in the house of Garrison, a short distance from Trinity river, in the extreme southeastern portion of the county. Garrison entered a plea of not guilty when arraigned on the indictment last week and testified he shot at a person he thought to be a hi-jacker, advancing on him with a knife and
masked. He denied shooting Aude Washburn his (Garrison’s) friend for many years.

Testimony was completed Saturday but the presentation of the charge of the Court and attorney’s arguments were postponed until Wednesday morning when Miss Turner Mae Garner, daughter of John T. Garner, a juror, was taken suddenly ill and died early Monday morning.

Arguments Wednesday.
Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor and former criminal district attorney, opened the arguments for the state Wednesday morning and was followed by Richard Mays, defense counsel. A. P. Mays spoke for the defense at the Wednesday afternoon session with John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, closing for the prosecution.

The entire trial over a period of a week attracted unusual attention and the courtroom was packed with interested spectators throughout with scores unable to procure seats at a number of the sessions. A large crowd remained in the courtroom until the jury returned its verdict.

Notes:



Formal Motion For New Trial Filed Friday

A formal motion for a new trial of J. W. (Jim) Garrison was filed in the district clerk’s office Friday by Defense Attorneys Richard and A. P. Mays.

The motion is of fourteen pages containing forty different objections and attacks on the Court’s charge, conduct of state attorneys, jurors, etc.

Garrison was convicted by a jury Wednesday afternoon and given ten years in the penitentiary for the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry Dec. 24, 1934. Garrison entered a plea of not guilty when arraigned.

The case was tried before Special District Judge Norris W. Lovett. A definite time for the hearing of the motion for a new trial had not been determined early Friday afternoon.

Notes:



Courthouse News.
District Court.
The defendant’s motion for a new trial in the case of the State of Texas vs. Jim Garrison, is scheduled to be heard Monday morning at 10 o’clock. All members of the jury have been summoned to appear at that time.

Garrison was found guilty by the jury for the murder of Aude Washburn last Wednesday and assessed his punishment at 10 years in the penitentiary. A motion for a new trial was filed Friday and in the event the motion is overruled, it has been intimated that the case will be appealed to the court of criminal appeals at Austin.

Notes:



MOTION FOR NEW GARRISON TRIAL IS ARGUED ON MONDAY

MAN CONVICTED FOR SLAYING AUDE WASHBURN SEEKS NEW HEARING

A motion for a new trial for Jim Garrison, 62, was being heard in the Thirteenth judicial district court, Monday before two judges—Norris W. Lovett, special judge who presided during the trial and J. S. Callicutt, regular judge.

Garrison was convicted last Wednesday by a jury and was given ten years in the penitentiary in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, 51, near Wildcat Ferry in the extreme southeastern corner of Navarro county, Dec. 24, 1934.

The formal motion, attacking the charge of the court, admission of certain evidence, arguments of the state attorneys, John R. Curington, criminal district attorney, and Cleo G. Miller, special prosecutor, conduct of the jury, etc. was presented Monday morning, covering 14 pages and in 40 sections. The defense attorneys are Richard and A. P. Mays.

The 12 men who constituted the jury in the trial of Garrison, were on hand after being summoned as witnesses in the motion for a new trial.

Court attaches stated it was probable the hearing would not be completed until late Monday afternoon.

Notes:



GARRISON RELEASED ON $5000 BOND FOR RULING ON APPEAL

Jim Garrison was released on bond in the sum of $5,000 to await the result of the appeal of his case to the Court of Criminal Appeals, Austin, Tuesday morning after he was sentenced to the penitentiary for not less than two nor more than ten years by Special District Judge Norris w. Lovett.

Garrison was convicted by a jury last week and given ten years on a murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. Sentence was pronounced by Judge Lovett Tuesday morning when the order over-ruling the defendant’s motion for a new trial was formally entered after the hearing was held Monday with Judge Lovett and District Judge J. S. Callicutt hearing the motions.

Sureties on the bond of $5,000 were Robert Witherspoon and Mrs. Jane Robinson.

Notes:

 


COURTHOUSE NEWS.
Court Proceedings.
AUSTIN, June 12.—(AP)—Proceeding today in the court of criminal appeals;
Submitted on brief and oral argument---J. E. Elig from Anderson; J. W. Howell from Randall; Jim Garrison from Navarro.

Notes:



COURTHOUSE NEWS.
District Court.
The Court of Criminal Appeals, Austin, Wednesday reversed and remanded the case of Jim Garrison from Navarro county according to copies of the opinion of the court received Thursday by District Judge J. S. Callicutt and attorneys. The verdict was reversed and remanded, according to the opinion, for the arguments of state’s attorney (John R. Curington) and also for the exhibiting of the bloody shirt of Aude Washburn for whose death Garrison was tried. The opinion also said the trial court (Norris Lovett) erred in not charging the jury that the jury was the sole judges of the facts proven, credibility of witnesses and weight given of testimony.

Garrison was convicted and sentenced to 10 years in the penitentiary early this year on murder indictment in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn at Garrison’s home, near Wildcat Ferry, southeast Navarro county, Dec. 24, 1924.

Mays and Mays were defense attorneys and appealed the case after a motion for a new trial was denied by Judge Lovett.

Notes:


Courthouse News.
District Court.
A special venire of 50 prospective jurors for service in three murder trials has been selected for Thursday. The venire is in the cases of Hampton Kerr, negro, charged with murder; Jim Garrison, indicted for murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aube Washburn in the Southeastern section of Navarro county, December 24, 1934, and the case of Albert Meritt, indicted for murder in connection with the death several weeks ago of Elmer Kitchens, state highway maintenance department employee, after having been struck by a truck on Highway 14 between Richland and Currie.

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Courthouse News.
District Court.
All witnesses in the cases of Jim Garrison and Clifton Dunnings, charged by indictments for murder, set for trial Wednesday were excused until further notified Thursday morning by District Judge Wayne R. Howell as the case of Ben Widener, murder went to trial Thursday morning.

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Courthouse News.
District Court.
The case of the State of Texas vs. Jim Garrison, charged with murder, was postponed Monday morning until Monday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock by Judge Wayne R. Howell, when a motion for a continuance was presented, due to the illness of the defendant.

Garrison was indicted in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry Dec. 24, 1934. He was tried and convicted here and assessed a term of ten years in the penitentiary but the case was reversed and remanded by the court of criminal appeals.

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Courthouse News.
District Court.
District Judge Wayne R. Howell Monday afternoon granted a defense motion for a continuance in the case of Jim Garrison after Dr. S. H. Burnett, county health officer, testified he was physically unable to stand trial.

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Courthouse News.
District Court.
Special venires of 50 perspective jurors were being summoned Tuesday for Dec. 13 for the cases of Ruf Tickle and Jim Garrison both murder charges.

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Courthouse news.
District court.
Trial of Jim Garrison got under way in the Thirteenth judicial district court Monday morning. He is under indictment for murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. At a previous trial Garrison was found guilty and was assessed 10 years in the penitentiary. The verdict, however, was reversed and remanded on appeal by the Court of Criminal Appeals, Austin.

The state is being represented by Cleo G. Miller, criminal district attorney, and J. C. Jacobs assistant. The defendant is being represented by Mays and Mays. Attorneys said the defendant would plea not guilty when arraigned. A special venire of 36 men in addition to the regular jury panel was summoned in the case. Selection of a jury was in progress at the noon recess.


Notes:



Courthouse News.
District Court.
The trial of Jim Garrison on murder indictment was in progress in the district court Tuesday. He is being tried in the connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. The defendant entered a plea of not guilty when arraigned on the indictment Monday afternoon.

Garrison was convicted and given ten years on a previous trial but the verdict was set aside when the Court of Criminal Appeals reversed and remanded the case.

The jury trying the case is composed of T. H. Bowden, Rice; W. S. Harlan, Richland; Rush Green, Rice; J. H. Magness, Wortham; J. R. Garner, Chatfield; J. R. Shipman, Purdon; F. F. Blair, Chatfield; Will M. Burns, Purdon; H. D. Fall, Dawson; Frnak Seeley, Emhouse; Jim B. Collin, Emhouse; S. H. Allen, Emhouse.

The defense and state exercised 10 challenges each while five were excused for cause.

C. P. Ray of Austin, formerly an undertaker at Kerens, was the only witness used Monday afternoon after the jury was completed.

Witnesses testifying Tuesday morning were Bert Washburn, brother of the deceased; Mrs. White West, Andrews, Texas, formerly of Rural Shade.

The prosecution is being handled by Cleo G. Miller, criminal district attorney, and J. C. Jacobs, assistant, Mays and Mays are representing Garrison.

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Courthouse News.
District Court.
Jim Garrison took the stand in his trial on murder indictment in the district court Wednesday. He is being tried in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. Garrison testified he and Washburn were the best of friends and had never had any trouble.

With reference to the fatal shooting of Washburn, Garrison said Washburn had left his house, according to his memory, and he (Garrison) saw a masked man, armed with a knife advancing on him. Garrison said he believed at the time the man was a person with whom he had experienced previous trouble. He fired one time with a shotgun. The defendant said he didn’t know he had slain Washburn until the next day after he was in the county jail.

Indications were tat evidence will be completed some time Wednesday afternoon.

The state rested Tuesday afternoon.

The defense is relying on temporary insanity, caused by excessive use of alcohol over a long period of time.

The prosecution is being conducted by Cleo G. Miller and J. C. Jacobs, criminal district attorney and assistant, respectively. The defense is being conducted by Mays & Mays.

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Complete Testimony In Garrison Trial
District Judge Wayne R. Howell Wednesday afternoon was to prepare his charge to the jury in the trial of Jim Garrison, charged with murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, Dec. 24, 1934.

Testimony was completed Wednesday noon, with the exception of that to be given by two physicians Thursday morning. As soon as the charge is prepared and the two physicians testify, arguments of the attorneys will get under way, Cleo G. Miller, criminal district attorney, stated Wednesday afternoon.

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Courthouse News.
District Court.
The charge of District Judge Wayne R. Howell was in the hands of attorneys in the trial of Jim Garrison Thursday morning and arguments were scheduled to complete during the day.

The case will probably reach the jury late Thursday.

Garrison is being tried in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn, near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. He took the stand on his own behalf Wednesday and testified he shot what he believed to be a masked robber, armed with a knife, and did not know until the following day he had killed Washburn.

The defendant received a 10-year sentence on a former trial but the case was reversed and remanded by the Court of Criminal Appeals.

Cleo G. Miller and J. C. Jacobs criminal district attorney and assistant, respectively, conducted the prosecution, while Garrison is represented by Mays and Mays.

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Courthouse News.
District Court.
The jury in the case of Jim Garrison, murder, returned a verdict of not guilty to District Judge Wayne R. Howell Friday morning after deliberating since Thursday afternoon.

Garrison was tried in connection with the fatal shooting of Aude Washburn near Wildcat Ferry, Dec. 24, 1934. He plead not guilty when arraigned.

On a previous trial, a verdict of guilty was returned and his punishment was assessed at 10 years in the penitentiary, but the court of criminal appeals reversed and remanded the verdict.

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James William “Jim” Garrison
Aug 4, 1871 - Nov 13, 1954

AGED MAN IS 15TH TRAFFIC VICTIM HERE

Jim Garrison, 83, Route 5, Corsicana, died in the Navarro Clinic Saturday night a few hours after he was struck by an automobile at the intersection of East First avenue and Highway 75.

His death is the fifteenth highway traffic fatality in Navarro county this year.

Funeral services were held Sunday at 3:30 p.m. from the Griffin Funeral Chapel. Burial was in the Rice cemetery.

The rites were conducted by Rev. J. C. Coffey, Jr., pastor of the First Baptist Church Mission in East Corsicana.

City Police Robinson, who investigated the mishap, said the car figuring in the accident was driven by H. M. Marshall, negro, Route 5, Corsicana. Marshall’s wife was a passenger in the car at the time of the accident. Officer Bill Onstott also investigated.

A Corley ambulance carried Garrison to the clinic.

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Mandy Garrison, Corsicana, and a number of nieces and nephews.

Nephews were pallbearers.

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Minnie L. (Smith) Young
Nov 24, 1872 - May 31, 1952

Mrs. Minnie Young Dies At Corpus

KERENS, June 2, --Mrs. Minnie Young, 79, long-time resident of Kerens, died in a Corpus Christi hospital Saturday afternoon after a short illness.

Mrs. Young had resided in Kerens most of her life, and was a member of and active in the First Presbyterian Church here.

Funeral services were held Monday at 2:30 p.m. from the First Presbyterian Church in Kerens, with Rev. R. C. Linder officiating. Burial was in the cemetery at Ferris.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Robert Campbell of Kerens and Mrs. R. M. Reeves of Corpus Christi; two grandchildren and other relatives.

Pallbearers were Frank Weeden, James Red, Blair Phillips, Fred Jennings, John Weeden and J. M. Dunaho.

Notes:

  • The Corsicana Daily Sun - Monday, June 2, 1952
  • the death certificate says buried in Kerens, Tx. but she died in Corpus Christi so that just may have been where she was shipped to because the obit says she is buried in Ferris—Barnett E. Young could have been her husband. He was born in Ferris, Ellis Co., Texas about 1870 –Her daughter Jennie Barnett (Young) Campbell is buried in Kerens Cemetery.
  • d/o Minnie (unk) Smith w/o Barnett E. Young married May 16, 1900
  • Submitted by Diane Richards

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Edward L. Williams & Barbara Knox